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1950s Art – Charting the Post-War Era Shifts

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Step into the vibrant world of 1950s art, where bold brushstrokes danced on canvas and rebellion pulsed through every gallery wall. A decade teeming with innovation, the 1950s ignited a revolution in artistic expression, pushing boundaries, challenging norms, and summoning forth a kaleidoscope of creativity. From the abstract splatters of Jackson Pollock to the sleek lines of mid-century modern design, this era encapsulated a spirit of experimentation and exuberance that continues to captivate and inspire. Join us as we journey back to a time when art crackled with energy and every stroke told a story of change and possibility. Welcome to the electrifying world of 1950s art!

Table of Contents

  • 1 Key Takeaways
  • 2 Cultural Panorama of 1950s Art
  • 3.1 Pioneers of the Movement
  • 3.2 Influences and Techniques
  • 3.3 Women of Abstract Expressionism
  • 4.1 Post-War Influence and Diversity
  • 4.2 Art and Popular Culture
  • 5.1 Continuation of Surrealism
  • 5.2 Action Painting
  • 5.3 Color Field Painting
  • 5.4 The Emergence of Pop Art
  • 6 Famous 1950s Artists
  • 7 Legacy of 1950s Art
  • 8.1 What Were the Defining Characteristics of Art During the 1950s?
  • 8.2 Who Are Some Prominent Artists Who Rose to Fame During the 1950s?
  • 8.3 What Styles and Movements in Art Were Predominant in the 1950s?

Key Takeaways

  • The 1950s was an era of significant change and innovation in the art scene.
  • Abstract Expressionism emerged as a dominant movement, signifying a shift towards abstract and non-representational art.
  • Artistic developments in the 1950s responded to and reflected the social and political atmosphere of the time.

Cultural Panorama of 1950s Art

The 1950s art scene was a canvas of dramatic transformation, reflecting the post-World War II ethos. At the core of this milieu was Abstract Expressionism, a movement that commanded a significant presence, notably in the United States. It represented the avant-garde, with artists like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko pushing boundaries through spontaneous expressions and bold color fields. Influential movements from the 1950s included Abstract Expressionism, Color Field painting, and the precursor to Pop art.

1950s Art History

In stark contrast to the action painting of Abstract Expressionism, Color Field painting evolved as a sub-genre with emphasis on large areas of a single hue, offering a tranquil and meditative experience. This direction could be seen as an aesthetic counterbalance to the energetic and dynamic gestural strokes typical of its predecessor.

The 1950s also subtly sowed the seeds for later developments. Early stirrings of Pop Art began to surface, hinting at the impending cultural shift where art would interlace with consumerism and mass media. This period laid the framework for artists such as Andy Warhol to later take center stage in the art world. Sociopolitical influences of the 1950s encompassed post-war consciousness, Cold War tensions, and the Civil Rights movement.

Art in the 1950s didn’t exist in a vacuum. It was inseparable from the larger societal currents: the optimism of the post-war boom, the anxiety of the Cold War, and the burgeoning civil rights movement. These elements all found their way into the art of the time, as artists grappled with new realities and channeled the zeitgeist into their work.

The decade’s artistic output was a dialogue between the personal and the political, a reflection of its era’s complexity and a precursor to the radical changes that would define the following decade.

The Rise of Abstract Expressionism

Abstract Expressionism emerged as a powerful direction in American painting, marking a fundamental shift from European influence to an American-centered art scene post-World War II.

1950s Art Movements

Pioneers of the Movement

Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Mark Rothko stand out as pivotal figures in Abstract Expressionism. These artists were crucial in propelling the movement in New York during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Pollock was renowned for his drip painting technique, a style that became emblematic of the movement’s ethos.

De Kooning’s use of women as a subject matter coupled with his spontaneous brushwork reflected the complexity and dynamism of Abstract Expressionism.

Influences and Techniques

The trauma and aftermath of World War II heavily influenced Abstract Expressionism, instilling a sense of freedom and emotional intensity in the artwork. Techniques varied widely amongst the artists, but many shared a common interest in spontaneity and subconscious creation. These methods were often grouped under “action painting,” epitomized by Pollock, which emphasized the physical act of painting itself. Rothko represented another aspect of the movement, focusing on vast color fields to evoke an emotional response.

Abstract 1950s Art

Women of Abstract Expressionism

Women, though often overlooked, played a vital role in the movement. Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning emerged as significant artists in their own right. Krasner’s contributions were not only in her own abstract canvases but also in her critical role in promoting Pollock’s work.

Mitchell’s bold and vibrant canvases were influential in expanding the movement’s reach, while Elaine de Kooning, Willem’s wife, captured the spirit of Abstract Expressionism through her portraiture.

Cultural Shifts and Artistic Responses

The aftermath of World War II brought about far-reaching cultural shifts within the 1950s that were deeply intertwined with the era’s art movements. Art became an outlet for confronting and interpreting the social, economic, and political changes of the time.

1950s Art Style

Post-War Influence and Diversity

In the United States, the post-war economy burgeoned, bringing affluence and a rise in consumer goods, establishing a material culture that shaped artistic expression. New art movements surfaced as artists sought to make sense of the war’s impact and the ensuing changes. Abstract Expressionism flourished, with artists like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning abandoning traditional composition in favor of abstract, emotive works.

This movement underscored the freedom of individual expression and the diversity of thought that characterized the post-war art scene.

Internationally, wartime destruction and rebuilding efforts significantly influenced Japan and the Soviet Union, which in turn impacted global perspectives on art. Japanese art took new directions as the country reconstructed, introducing novel artistic interactions between East and West, while the Soviet Union’s art remained under state control, emphasizing socialist realism.

Art and Popular Culture

During the 1950s, the lines between high art and popular culture began to blur. Pop Art emerged, symbolizing an artistic response to the prevalent consumer culture. Pioneers like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jasper Johns challenged traditional boundaries by incorporating imagery from advertising, comics, and mundane objects into their work.

1950s Art Figures

Warhol’s bold depictions of iconic consumer goods and celebrities reflected the burgeoning relationship between art and popular culture. Similarly, Lichtenstein’s use of comic strip motifs critiqued the mass production and disposable nature of modern society. This era witnessed a democratization of art, as it became more accessible and relevant to the general public, with popular culture serving both as subject matter and medium.

Significant Art Movements and Styles

In the 1950s, art movements diverged significantly, branching into abstract and figurative styles. This period saw the continuation of earlier art movements and the emergence of new styles that would deeply influence the trajectory of modern art.

From color field painting and surrealism to the emergence of pop art, this decade had much to offer the art world. 

Continuation of Surrealism

Surrealism, having matured in the interwar period, persisted into the 1950s, with artists continuing to explore the subconscious and dream-like imagery. Its influence was notably evident in American art where figures like Arshile Gorky took inspiration to create abstract works that hinted at surrealist motives and subconscious narratives.

Explore 1950s Art

Action Painting

Action Painting, a core part of the Abstract Expressionism movement, saw American artists like Jackson Pollock engaging in a dynamic form of painting that emphasized the physical action involved in the creative process. This emphasis on spontaneous, vigorous, and bold brushwork marked a significant shift toward abstraction in American art.

Key features of Action painting included an emphasis on the physical act of painting, the utilization of non-traditional painting tools, and the creation of large, often mural-sized canvases.

Color Field Painting

Color Field Painting emerged as a variant of Abstract Expressionism, focusing on large areas of solid color to engage viewers with a purely visual experience. Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman are exemplary in this genre, using vast expanses of color to evoke an emotional response devoid of figurative representation. The distinguishing traits of Color Field painting encompassed large fields of flat, solid color, minimal brushwork or texture, and a focus on color’s emotional impact.

Famous 1950s Art

The Emergence of Pop Art

In the late 1950s, Pop Art began to appear notably in British art, laying the groundwork for what became a major movement in the 1960s. Its focus on everyday objects and popular media starkly contrasted the abstraction of the earlier part of the decade. Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein would soon become leading figures, translating the design and aesthetics of consumer culture into the realm of fine art. Innovations in Pop Art included the incorporation of mass media and advertising imagery, the use of bold colors and graphic design techniques, as well as the utilization of irony and satire to comment on contemporary culture.

With the advent of digital technology, these movements set the stage for later developments in art, including the text-based provocations of artists like Jenny Holzer, whose work in the subsequent decades would encapsulate the blend of design, language, and fine art.

Famous 1950s Artists

The 1950s witnessed a pivotal shift in the art world, with artists exploring new methodologies and styles that diverged from traditional representations. Among these revolutionary creators, Ellsworth Kelly made a significant impact with his bold, abstract works. His painting “Tiger” from 1953 exemplifies his approach with its multiple joined panels. Another group of prominent artists of the 1950s were the Abstract Expressionists, known for their spontaneous and emotive styles. Key figures included:

  • Mark Rothko (1903 – 1970): Rothko’s luminous fields of color aimed to evoke deep emotional responses from viewers.
  • Clyfford Still (1904 – 1980): Revered for his monumental and emotionally charged abstract paintings, characterized by sweeping fields of color and jagged forms.
  • Willem de Kooning (1904 – 1997): Famed for his abstract portrayal of the figure, de Kooning’s vigorous brushwork conveyed intense emotional content.
  • Barnett Newman (1905 – 1970): Famous for his large, color-field paintings featuring vertical bands or “zips,” Newman’s work explored themes of existentialism and the sublime, influencing the development of Minimalism.
  • Franz Kline (1910 – 1962): Noted for his bold, black-and-white abstract paintings characterized by powerful brushstrokes and strong contrasts, contributing to the development of Abstract Expressionism.
  • Jackson Pollock (1912 – 1956): Renowned for his drip painting technique, Pollock’s dynamic and rhythmic compositions became synonymous with Abstract Expressionism.
  • Joan Mitchell (1925 – 1992): Known for her dynamic and emotionally charged abstract paintings, Mitchell’s works often reflected the energy and vitality of the natural world.
  • Robert Rauschenberg (1925 – 2008): Recognized for his groundbreaking “combine” paintings, which merged elements of painting and sculpture, as well as for his pioneering contributions to Pop Art.
  • Helen Frankenthaler (1928 – 2011): Remembered for her innovative “soak-stain” technique, where she poured diluted paint onto raw canvas, creating ethereal and luminous compositions.
  • Jasper Johns (1930 – Present): Noted for his iconic representations of everyday objects, such as flags and targets, which challenged traditional notions of representation and symbolism.

1950s Artists

The 1950s also introduced a melting pot of musical artists who influenced the culture. Names like Elvis Presley and Ray Charles reshaped the soundscape of the decade and beyond. However, their influence on the visual arts, while culturally significant, is a separate subject of interest. This period heralded a new chapter in art history, with these artists and others forging paths that would inform and inspire generations of creators that followed.

Legacy of 1950s Art

The art of the 1950s is pivotal in the history of modern art, marking a transition from traditional techniques to innovative expressions. This era’s artwork is often remembered for its bold experimentation and the genesis of significant art movements that shaped the contemporary art landscape.

One enduring influence from the 1950s is Abstract Expressionism, characterized by spontaneous, automatic, or subconscious creations. Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings are perhaps the most iconic of this movement. Abstract Expressionism paved the way for numerous modern art approaches, emphasizing the artist’s freedom to convey emotions and ideas beyond representational accuracy.

Additionally, the 1950s heralded the introduction of Pop Art. Artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein started to incorporate popular culture, commercial imagery, and mass production techniques into their works.

History of 1950s Art

This integration created a dialogue on the role of art in consumer society, often involving a mixture of irony and celebration, influencing commercial and visual culture. A further legacy from the 1950s is the concept of Combine Paintings, introduced by Robert Rauschenberg. These works combined non-traditional materials and objects, which blurred the lines between painting, sculpture, and collage.

The Color Field painting, as demonstrated by artists like Mark Rothko, focused on the lyrical or emotional content conveyed through large areas of color, emphasizing simplicity and a meditative atmosphere. Abstract Expressionism embraced freedom in artistic expression, Pop Art seamlessly blended popular culture with fine arts, Combine Paintings innovatively mixed materials and genres, while Color Field art emphasized the emotive power of color. The intricacy of these movements reflects a broader cultural and political shift after World War II, as artists explored new ways to express the era’s complexities, setting the stage for generations of artists to come.

As we bid adieu to the captivating realm of 1950s art, we find ourselves enriched by its dynamic tapestry of innovation, defiance, and boundless imagination. Through the lens of this remarkable era, we witness not just the evolution of artistic styles, but a reflection of the cultural and societal shifts that defined an entire generation. The legacy of the 1950s lives on, its echoes reverberating through contemporary art and reminding us that the spirit of experimentation and boldness knows no bounds. As we navigate the ever-changing landscape of creativity, let us carry forward the spirit of the 1950s—a reminder that in art, as in life, the only limits are those we dare not challenge.

Frequently Asked Questions

What were the defining characteristics of art during the 1950s.

Art from the 1950s was largely influenced by the socio-political climate of the post-war era. It was characterized by a spirit of innovation, experimentation, and a break from traditional forms. Abstract Expressionism, for instance, emphasized spontaneous, automatic, or subconscious creation, and was marked by a focus on dynamic, gestural brushstrokes.

Who Are Some Prominent Artists Who Rose to Fame During the 1950s?

Several artists gained fame during this time, including Jackson Pollock, known for his drip painting; Mark Rothko, celebrated for his color field paintings; and Willem de Kooning, noted for his abstract expressionist works. These artists were instrumental in moving American art to the forefront of the international scene during this time.

What Styles and Movements in Art Were Predominant in the 1950s?

The 1950s art scene was dominated by Abstract Expressionism, largely in the United States, and it was the first American movement to achieve international influence. Additionally, Color Field Painting and Minimalism began to emerge towards the end of the decade, while Cubism and Surrealism continued to influence artists around the globe.

isabella meyer

Isabella studied at the University of Cape Town in South Africa and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts majoring in English Literature & Language and Psychology. Throughout her undergraduate years, she took Art History as an additional subject and absolutely loved it. Building on from her art history knowledge that began in high school, art has always been a particular area of fascination for her. From learning about artworks previously unknown to her, or sharpening her existing understanding of specific works, the ability to continue learning within this interesting sphere excites her greatly.

Her focal points of interest in art history encompass profiling specific artists and art movements, as it is these areas where she is able to really dig deep into the rich narrative of the art world. Additionally, she particularly enjoys exploring the different artistic styles of the 20 th century, as well as the important impact that female artists have had on the development of art history.

Learn more about Isabella Meyer and the Art in Context Team .

Cite this Article

Isabella, Meyer, “1950s Art – Charting the Post-War Era Shifts.” Art in Context. February 21, 2024. URL: https://artincontext.org/1950s-art/

Meyer, I. (2024, 21 February). 1950s Art – Charting the Post-War Era Shifts. Art in Context. https://artincontext.org/1950s-art/

Meyer, Isabella. “1950s Art – Charting the Post-War Era Shifts.” Art in Context , February 21, 2024. https://artincontext.org/1950s-art/ .

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The Decade 1950-1960

The Decade 1950-1960

IIlustration (detail) above: Coby Whitmore

In the early 1950s, the Korean War, coming so soon after the end of the Second World War, found the news media well prepared for foreign reporting, and for the first time television cameras were used to record events as they happened. The Soviet Union had gained strength and as it absorbed what were called the "Eastern bloc" countries during and after World War II, the threat of the spread of Communism resulted in paranoia in the West. American senator Joseph McCarthy investigated those in the government who might ever have had a link to communist organizations or even had left-wing views. Homegrown anti-communist propaganda spread throughout American culture, with illustrated ads, posters, and feature articles warning of the "Red" menace and what it would do to the American way of life. The "Cold War" with the Soviet Union and Communist China began, and the arms race with its very real potential for atomic annihilation drove the country to fear for the future. In stressful times people seek diversions, and the entertainment industry provided movies produced in full-color and wide-screen formats, while the new medium of television was entering nearly every American home. 

how to make 50s art

Cold War era corporate advertisement. Artist unknown.

In spite of the advent of television, the magazine publishing industry grew rapidly in the 1950s after a long lull through the Great Depression and war years. The Saturday Evening Post  and  Look had become the last remaining general interest family magazines and continued to publish articles of current events, short fiction, and features about family life and the arts.  The largest consumer market in book and magazine publishing was women.

how to make 50s art

Coby Whitmore , Cosmopolitan magazine, 1952

Cultural pressure to create the idealized American family had changed the image of self-sufficient, war-time women back to an earlier generation’s model of wife/mother/housekeeper (or single girl searching for romance and a husband) and all media reinforced this: radio, television, movies, and the publishing world. Stay-at-home mothers and even working women were a big part of the reading audience and the publishing industry provided them with gender specific magazines which used illustration. The term ”Seven Sisters” was applied to the dominant women’s magazines:  Ladies Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, Woman’s Day, Women’s Home Companion, McCall’s, Redbook, and  Cosmopolitan . These powerhouse publications were extensively illustrated and provided high-paying work to the top illustrators of the time, many of whom were working through agencies and professional sales representatives who brought in the work for a commission. Al Parker, Jon Whitcomb , Austin Briggs, Coby Whitmore , Joe De Mers, Bernard D’Andrea , and his wife Lorraine Fox were among the top-ranking illustrators of the day.

how to make 50s art

Bernard D'Andrea

how to make 50s art

Lorraine Fox

A range of publications for men were on the newsstands, too. There were special interest magazines for hunting, fishing, flying, mechanics, and science which all used illustration, as well as those which provided general interest men’s lifestyle content. Some featured photo layouts of beautiful women, like Hugh Hefner's  Playboy  magazine and Esquire  magazine, both of which commissioned the best of illustration in each issue and strove to provide quality short fiction as well. Pulp short-story magazines and paperback pulp novels provided action, adventure, and science-fiction or fantasy stories and every issue had full-color cover illustrations. Two of the great pulp fiction artists of the 1940s and 1950s were Norman Saunders and Virgil Finlay. 

how to make 50s art

Norman Saunders

Throughout the publishing world there were plenty of assignments, even for young, entry level artists, but the way that illustrators were given assignments was beginning to change. Competition in manufacturing in a strengthening post-war, 1950s economy caused a surge in advertising (which increased revenues for newspaper and magazine publishers), and “Madison Avenue,” where the big New York ad agencies were located, became the nexus of a profession second only to Hollywood in its glamour. Advertising concept artists and storyboard artists could be employed in full-time, well paying jobs visualizing print ad campaigns and laying out commercials for the new medium of television. Magazines were competing furiously, and to maintain their already successful formulas, art direction was getting more specific—more and more, artists were being told what to illustrate and even how to illustrate it. The "boy/girl picture" and the "clinch," ( Jon Whitcomb ) were terms used to describe the formulaic embraces appearing in the women's magazines that most always showed a blonde female with dark-penciled brows, red lipstick, and a "peaches and cream" complexion who was paired with a tanned male, whose face was often half-hidden. If an artist objected to the specifics of the assignment, there were many others waiting in the wings to do the work. 

how to make 50s art

Jon Whitcomb , magazine illustration

Predictably, creative art directors began to tire of the formulaic and stylized realism which dominated magazine illustration. Some began to turn to more spontaneous approaches for inspiration—like fashion illustration, poster art, and even fine art and printmaking by artists like  Leonard Baskin  and Ben Shaun.

Just as families had gathered around their radios in the 1930s and 1940s, they now spent evenings at home, watching television together. People still kept their magazine subscriptions, but movies and television were now the dominant forms of entertainment. Animation was increasingly popular in movie theater shorts ( UPA’s Gerald McBoing Boing) and on TV, and the playfulness of drawn characters in animation art influenced editorial and book illustrators. “Cartoony" drawing styles were beginning to be seen in many areas of illustration. U.S. ad agencies began using artists from Europe like  André Francois  whose simple, bold style for posters and advertising art was a refreshing change from American realism and inspired American ad agencies to consider looser approaches.

In the late 1950s, photography began to replace conventional, realistic illustration in advertising. More abstract approaches to illustration however, did not compete with what the camera could do and innovative art directors utilized illustrators with more playful styles as a way of attracting attention to ads or publications. It was clear that the second half of the 20th Century would bring a surge of creative stylizations.

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Leonard Baskin , 1952

how to make 50s art

United Productions of America (UPA) animation art

how to make 50s art

André François , 1956

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1951-T No. 3, Clyfford Still

1951-T No. 3 1951

At the Solferino-Paris bridge, Théo Kerg

At the Solferino-Paris bridge Théo Kerg, 1951

Baboon and Young, Pablo Picasso

Baboon and Young Pablo Picasso, 1951

Canyons, Charles Sheeler

Canyons Charles Sheeler, 1951

Christ of Saint John of the Cross, Salvador Dalí

Christ of Saint John of the Cross Salvador Dalí, 1951

Dancers of Tlaxcala, Carlos Mérida

Dancers of Tlaxcala Carlos Mérida, 1951

Many Mansions, Madge Gill

Many Mansions Madge Gill, 1951

Our Land, Charles White

Our Land Charles White, 1951

Still Life, Giorgio Morandi

Still Life Giorgio Morandi, 1951

The City, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva

The City Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, 1950 – 1951

Through the headlights we see the land of fire, Aloïse Corbaz

Through the headlights we see the land of fire Aloïse Corbaz, 1941 – 1951

Triangle Form, Ellsworth Kelly

Triangle Form Ellsworth Kelly, 1951

Two = One, Saloua Raouda Choucair

Two = One Saloua Raouda Choucair, 1947 – 1951

Vir Heroicus Sublimis, Barnett Newman

Vir Heroicus Sublimis Barnett Newman, 1950 – 1951

White Painting, Three Panel, Robert Rauschenberg

White Painting, Three Panel Robert Rauschenberg, 1951

#10, Mark Rothko

#10 Mark Rothko, 1952

Arabesque Brush, Albert Gleizes

Arabesque Brush Albert Gleizes, 1952

Balanced Forms, Araceli Gilbert

Balanced Forms Araceli Gilbert, 1952

Composition for Jazz, 2nd Series, Sonia Delaunay

Composition for Jazz, 2nd Series Sonia Delaunay, 1952

Composition with a Circle, Saloua Raouda Choucair

Composition with a Circle Saloua Raouda Choucair, 1952

Maquette of a Monument Symbolising the Liberation of the Spirit, Antoine Pevsner

Maquette of a Monument Symbolising the Liberation of the Spirit Antoine Pevsner, 1952

Mountains and Sea, Helen Frankenthaler

Mountains and Sea Helen Frankenthaler, 1952

Nude, Pan Yuliang

Nude Pan Yuliang, 1952

On the Contrary, Kay Sage

On the Contrary Kay Sage, 1952

Portrait of Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of Willem de Kooning Elaine de Kooning, 1952

Red and Yellow, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva

Red and Yellow Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, 1952

Shakuntala, Nandalal Bose

Shakuntala Nandalal Bose, 1952

Sharecropper, Elizabeth Catlett

Sharecropper Elizabeth Catlett, 1952

Some Roses and Their Phantoms, Dorothea Tanning

Some Roses and Their Phantoms Dorothea Tanning, 1952

Sorrow of the King, Henri Matisse

Sorrow of the King Henri Matisse, 1952

Step-Sister's Hen, Leonora Carrington

Step-Sister's Hen Leonora Carrington, 1952

Still Life, Giorgio Morandi

Still Life Giorgio Morandi, 1952

Study for a Portrait, Francis Bacon

Study for a Portrait Francis Bacon, 1952

Village People, Grégoire Michonze

Village People Grégoire Michonze, 1952

Woman I, Willem de Kooning

Woman I Willem de Kooning, 1950 – 1952

Woman, II, Willem de Kooning

Woman, II Willem de Kooning, 1952

African Theme III, Charles Alston

African Theme III Charles Alston, 1952 – 1953

Biblical scenes, Bodo

Biblical scenes Bodo, 1953

Composition with Vertical, Saloua Raouda Choucair

Composition with Vertical Saloua Raouda Choucair, 1953

Construction in space, Araceli Gilbert

Construction in space Araceli Gilbert, 1953

Gradual Rythmical Composition, Saloua Raouda Choucair

Gradual Rythmical Composition Saloua Raouda Choucair, 1953

Harvest Talk, Charles White

Harvest Talk Charles White, 1953

Linear Construction in Space no. 3, with Red, Naum Gabo

Linear Construction in Space no. 3, with Red Naum Gabo, 1952 – 1953

Migrating Birds, Norman Lewis

Migrating Birds Norman Lewis, 1953

Mother and Child (Abstract), Tamara de Lempicka

Mother and Child (Abstract) Tamara de Lempicka, 1953

New York, N.Y., Franz Kline

New York, N.Y. Franz Kline, 1953

Rooster, Vũ Cao Đàm

Rooster Vũ Cao Đàm, 1953

Scene with a Car, Chang Ucchin

Scene with a Car Chang Ucchin, 1953

Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance, Ellsworth Kelly

Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance Ellsworth Kelly, 1951 – 1953

Untitled, Mark Rothko

Untitled Mark Rothko, 1953

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2. Abstract Painting in the 1950s

Clayton Funk

Jackson Polok in front of his painting

Abstract Expressionism is a form of art (mainly painting) that developed after one of the most difficult periods in human history. This period began during the great depression in the 1930’s and ended with the end of World War II in 1945. When the war ended, Germany, Italy and Japan had been defeated and much of Europe and Japan were in ruins. The human loss in the Nazi concentration camps had been exposed in all of its horror and the United States had dropped atomic bombs on two Japanese cities, unleashing destructive power of an unprecedented nature. All of this, of course brought about a worldwide examination of basic human values and ethics and a period of dramatic change in art. Although both the Great Depression and World War II were great disasters, these events were important in forcing a number of the European avant-garde artists to flee Europe for the safety of the Americas, where they also influenced many younger artists in the United States. It is difficult to know exactly how much this migration affected American art, but part of its impact was that for the first time, American artists became internationally recognized for their new vision and a new artistic vocabulary, all of which soon became known as Abstract Expressionism .

These artists, like others earlier in the century, began to express their feelings and thoughts in abstract form. However, the difference here was that they expressed these abstract ideas and feelings with an energy that had never been seen before as they tried to draw upon their deepest essence, or a pure expression, from which generated excitement and even torment into a concrete form. They also took artistic license to an extreme that had never been seen before; and in doing so, they redefined what could be considered art and artistic process. Because this art movement was centered in New York, it is often referred to as the “New York School.” But Abstract Expressionism is often called “Action Painting” because the movement of painting, they felt, drew from innate parts of the artist’s mind. These artists often applied paint rapidly, painting on large canvases, sometimes applying paint with large brushes, sometimes dripping the paint onto the canvas or even throwing it onto the canvas. What appears to be painting done by accident, chance and random activity, was actually the result of planned and highly controlled attempts to tap what they considered was most essential and true in the subconscious . In this way, they often considered the process of making the painting as important as the painting itself. Like most other modern movements, which have been defined by critics and historians rather than artists, Abstract Expressionism does not describe only one particular style, but rather signifies an attitude toward making art. Confusing as it may seem, not all the work classified as Abstract Expressionism was abstract, nor was it all expressive, at least on a grand scale. This art stood in sharp contrast to the social realism and regionalism that characterized American art of earlier years, and the Abstract Expressionist artists valued, more than anything, their individuality and spontaneous improvisation of their artistic methods. This attitude was also characterized by a spirit of revolt and an intense belief in freedom of expression. Now we turn to reading biographies of major Abstract Expressionists. Read the artists under Abstract Expressionism on the web book menu at http://aaep1600.osu.edu/book/menu1950s.php Or follow this list:

  • Elaine de Kooning
  • Willem de Kooning
  • Grace Hartigan
  • Lee Krasner
  • Jackson Pollock

Others include Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline, Clyfford Still, Robert Motherwell and Sam Francis.

Post-painterly Abstraction

Post-painterly Abstraction is a movement given its name by the prominent American art critic, Clement Greenberg (as in the video above), in 1964, to distinguish a certain type of abstract painting of the 1960’s and after from the Abstract Expressionists of the 1940’s and 1950’s. The paintings of the abstract expressionists often involved a very strong personal and emotional approach to painting, expressed through a “painterly” quality involving spontaneous, very visible, and often vigorous brushwork. Helen Frankenthaler , the most prominent of this second generation Abstract Expressionists , had begun to eliminate this “painterly” approach through the use of thin stains of paint on ungessoed (raw) canvas in the 1950’s. The artists classified as P ost-painterly Abstractionists , influenced by Frankenthaler’s groundbreaking work, approached painting with a more impersonal, austere, and intellectual aesthetic. Their paintings dealt with the formal elements of abstract painting: pure or often unmodulated areas of color; a flat, two-dimensional space within the painting; monumental scale; and in the work of Stella and occasionally Noland, the rejection of the traditional rectangle as the shape of the canvas itself. They also rejected the painterly and spontaneous style of the Abstract Expressionists and instead they often stained raw canvas with thin wet paint to avoid any trace of brushstrokes. Among the styles included in the term post-painterly abstraction are “minimal painting” and “color-field painting.” Important painters associated post-painterly abstraction include Ellsworth Kelly, Morris Louis , Kenneth Noland , Jules Olitski, and Frank Stella . Now we turn to reading biographies of major painters. Read the artists under Post-painterly Abstraction on the web book menu at http://aaep1600.osu.edu/book/menu1950s.php Or just follow this list:

  • Helen Frankenthaler
  • Morris Louis
  • Kenneth Noland
  • Mark Rothko
  • Frank Stella

A Quick and Dirty Guide to Art, Music, and Culture Copyright © 2016 by Clayton Funk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Gillian Ayres CBE RA, Distillation 1957. Tate. © Gillian Ayres.

1950 Abstraction in Britain

Discover the abstract art created in Britain through the 1950s

The 1950s was a period of great change and experimentation in British art. Many artists adopted abstraction , art containing simplified figures or objects. Artists began to use spontaneity of gesture and chance to express a new-found freedom of artistic expression. Others followed mathematic principles of geometry and proportion in their construction.

Some artists in this room would base their artwork on landscapes or still lifes . This is known as abstract impressionism. Others would create art using objects that already existed, known as constructivism .

Tate Britain

Getting Here

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Constructivism

Constructivism was a particularly austere branch of abstract art founded by Vladimir Tatlin and Alexander Rodchenko in Russia around 1915

Pop Art 101: History, Techniques and How to Make It

Pop Art 101: History, Techniques and How to Make It

Pop art, short for popular art, is one of the largest art movements known in history. The famous movement emerged in the 1950s and boomed in the 1960s in America and Britain as artists drew inspiration from commercial and pop culture and created bold pieces that reflected the realities of everyday life. American pop art was highly influenced by American consumer culture, fame and celebrity culture, and postwar culture. The movement began as a revolt against elitism and traditional artistic norms and was a response to the capitalist and consumerism culture in postwar America. It was essentially a cultural revolution aimed to break down social norms and free people from conformity. 

Artists turned to Hollywood movies, pop music, comic books, and advertising as a more relatable and influential source for creating pop art. Major contributors to the movement include Andy Warhol, Richard Hamilton, and Roy Lichtenstein, who’ve created iconic pop art designs deeply embedded into our culture. Many believe Hamilton’s collage “Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?” may have sparked the beginning of the movement in 1956 in London. He described the movement’s characteristics as such: “Pop art is: Popular, Transient, Expendable, Low cost, Mass produced, Young, Witty, Sexy, Gimmicky, Glamorous, Big business.”

So, is pop art still relevant today? More than ever. From art exhibitions to merchandise sales, you’ll see pop art thriving all over the world. Artists today continue to incorporate pop art techniques into their designs, including signature graphic effects like saturated colors, strong outlines, dots, and bold cultural statements using everyday objects. Street artists like Banksy have shown pop art influence in their work using similar stencil and graphic design aesthetics. Pop art is still considered highly valuable in today’s market. Andy Warhol’s Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster) sold for a whopping $104.5 million in 2013!

Table of Contents

What Is Pop Art?

Pop art took everyday life and everyday objects and made them saturated with colors, bold outlines, and creative overlays. The style’s vibrancy is uniquely incorporated into everyday objects like soup cans, fruits, a pack of gum, and tools, or in media like newspapers, magazines, and comic strips. Pop art made mundane and commonplace objects into extraordinary ones, completely breaking the artistic norms and cultural hierarchy that was in place at the time. 

Pop art is instantly recognizable and can be spotted from miles away due to its zest and energetic colors and patterns, infamous imagery from popular media and products, and the innovative artistic techniques that characterized the pop art style. It often used repetition, symbols, overlays, and dots with primary color pallets of bright reds, blues, and yellows. Pop art also incorporated humor and irony which made the pieces so relatable to the masses. Artists used satire to poke fun at trends and fads, and bring light to current events and challenge the current way of life. 

#freetoedit #comic #comicbook #wow #pow #sketch

American Pop Versus British Pop Culture

Pop art first appeared in England in the mid-’50s and spread to the United States towards the end of the decade. But because there was a heavy American influence in Great Britain at the time, and a lot of the biggest names of the movement were American, there is a strong connection between the movement as it evolved in the US and in England. There are some differences, however.

In the US, pop art uses mundane reality, pop culture, irony, and sarcasm. American pop art was a result of the notion of the American dream. Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol were the most famous American pop artists.

On the other hand, in England, the movement started out with a more academic spin. English pop art was fed by American culture but through a different, more distant lens. The Brits used parody and self-deprecation to denounce the western system of manipulation, which simultaneously affected societal behavior and ushered in great material prosperity. Famous artists in the British pop art movement include Richard Hamilton, Nigel Henderson, and Eduardo Paolozzi.

Pop Art Techniques and Characteristics

Let’s take a look at the defining characteristics of pop art that made it such a powerful movement. 

Consumerism Theme:  Capitalism, consumption, and materialism are central themes of pop art. Campbell soup cans, Coca-Cola, and cereal boxes are among the many imageries used to depict well-known brand names and famous product packaging. Pop art emphasized materialism by showing off the affluence of postwar society through these products.

Pop art consumerism

Fame and Celebrity Culture:  The obsession with fame and celebrity culture is another main theme of pop art. As people consumed Hollywood, movies, magazines, and television, as did artists to create celebrity-inspired creations. Fun fact: The famous expression “Fifteen minutes of fame” came from Andy Warhol’s famous quote, “In the future, everybody will be world-famous for fifteen minutes.” Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley were among the many celebrities used in pop art designs.

pop art

Mass Media:  Pop art creators emulated mass media sources such as television, magazines, and comic strips. They often incorporated magazine cutouts, mimicked comic strips, and featured famous people and products, sometimes combining different mass media elements into one design.

pop art

Everyday Objects:  Ordinary objects found in everyday life found their way into famous pop art designs, often with a contemporary, satirical twist. From road signs and hamburgers to lightbulbs and bananas, pop art designers were able to elevate everyday objects to high art status while drawing on popular cultural references.

pop art banana

Enlarge and Repeat:  One technique artists used emphasized everyday objects was enlarging the images to huge scales and repeating the images for rows on end. This created a dramatic effect and a bold statement to drive home the theme of consumption. Imagine an eight-by-four grid canvas of big Campbell’s soup cans. This was one of Andy Warhol’s signature pop art styles. 

pop art

Use Material Out of Context:  Another pop art technique was to remove an object from its context as a standalone piece or combine it with other objects or images in line with the themes of capitalism, materialism, and fame. Another one of Andy Warhol’s famous pieces includes a giant Banana on the cover of The Velvet Underground’s debut album.

pop art vw bug

Collage Images:  Collages are a popular pop art technique used to combine graphic elements including photos, text, textures, advertising, magazine pages, and comic book cutouts. Pop art artists used collages to make cultural and artistic statements by combining a variety of different elements to play on the main consumerism themes. Hamilton’s first collage that sparked the pop art movement includes a multitude of famous products and people.

pop art collage

Innovative Screen Print Techniques:  Screenprint techniques such as silkscreen printing and lithography were used by famous artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein to achieve signature pop art looks. Bold outlines, clear lines, sharp colors, and techniques of mass media imagery were also visual styles adopted by pop art creators.

how to make 50s art

Reproduce, Overlay, and Duplicate:  Whether it’s a collage or repetition, pop art’s graphic effects are created through techniques of reproduction, overlay, and duplication of different images. Some creative collages often included repeated imagery and other overlaid graphics that reflected everyday life and objects, famous people, and recognizable brand names. 

#freetoedit #popart

Turn Your Photo Into Pop Art

Pop Art is unapologetically loud and bright and ignites a certain level of energy from within. What’s better than bringing that burst of energy to your own photos? Let’s take a look at how to make Pop Art with your photo using the Picsa rt app!

1. Open the Picsart app and tap on the plus sign at the bottom of your screen.

2. Upload the image to which you’d like to add pop art photo effects.

3. Click on the Effects tool at the bottom of your screen.

4. Scroll all the way right until you see the Pop Art category. That’s right, Picsart has an entire category dedicated to pop art! Now you have your very own Pop Art generator at your fingertips. 

how to make 50s art

5. Select a Pop Art filter and watch your image transform. Check out some of our favorite Pop Art effects: Glitch2, Spotted, Off Grid, and Pop Art Colors. 

6. If you’d like to make additional adjustments to the filter, double tap on the filter of your choice and adjust the scales accordingly. 

7. Tap Apply on the top right to save your edit.

8. Want to add more filters? Go back to Effects , click Pop Art , or click FX to select other trendy filters, like the popular Grunge Effect . You can layer on as many filters as you’d like. Remember to tap Apply after each edit.

how to make 50s art

9. Pro tip: Add fun stickers to your image for that pop art collage look. To add a sticker to your image, click Sticker , type in “Pop art” or any other search in the search box, and select a sticker. You can resize the sticker and make additional enhancements with the tools at the bottom of your screen. Tap Apply to save. Don’t be afraid to add multiple stickers!

how to make 50s art

10. To add text, click on the Text tool, type in your desired text, and select the orientation. You can change the font, color, opacity, and other features using the tools at the bottom of your screen. 

11. Add other enhancements using the Mask, Lens Flare, Shape Mask, and Frames tools. We suggest trying out Shape Masks for an extra dramatic pop art effect.

how to make 50s art

12. Finished with your Pop Art photo ? Click Next at the top right and Save or Post !

how to make 50s art

Create at the Speed of Culture  

Picsart is a full ecosystem of free-to-use content, powerful tools, and creator inspiration. With a billion downloads and more than 150 million monthly active creators, Picsart is the world’s largest creative platform. Picsart has collaborated with major artists and brands like BLACKPINK, the Jonas Brothers, Lizzo, Sanrio: Hello Kitty, I am a Voter, Bebe Rexha, Maroon 5, One Direction, Warner Bros. Entertainment, iHeartMedia, Condé Nast, and more. Download the app or start editing on web today to enhance your photos and videos with thousands of quick and easy editing tools, trendy filters, fun stickers, and brilliant backgrounds. Unleash your creativity and upgrade to Gold for premium perks!

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" > " > RetroSupply Co.

55 best retro and vintage photoshop tutorials.

One of the best ways to stay fresh, relevant and in-demand as a designer or illustrator is to learn from other talented creatives.

Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, it’s important to continually sharpen your skills — so we’ve scoured the web to bring you the very best retro and vintage tutorials for Photoshop.

  • The Best Retro and Vintage-Inspired Photoshop Brushes

To make navigation easier, we’ve divided the tutorials into the following categories: retro and vintage techniques; retro and vintage styles; typography tutorials; posters; photography; and Photoshop and Illustrator.

There’s no time like the present for learning new skills and finding new Photoshop ideas. Scroll down to start adding new strings to your creative bow – or bookmark this page for when you’re next able to invest a little time into growing your skill set. Trust us, your future self will thank you...

  • Best Free Retro and Vintage Fonts
  • Retro Photoshop Brushes: 50 of the Best
  • The RetroSupply Brush Guide for illustrators
  • Best Free Retro and Vintage Textures
  • 25 Best Retro and Vintage Illustrator Tutorials

Retro and vintage techniques

01. create a seamless texture in photoshop, 02. how to roughen the edges of your work in photoshop.

Photoshop tutorial: How to Roughen the Edges of Your Artwork

Find out how to quickly and easily roughen the edges of your work in Photoshop with this short video tutorial. The pro technique covered here will let you age your designs to create a tactile, natural effect – and the tutorial comes with a pack of 12 free Photoshop brushes (The Edge & Fold Distressor Brush Pack, which you can also download here for free) as well.

03. Create a Color Threshold Art Effect

Retro and vintage tutorials: color threshold

Learn to convert an image using the Threshold adjustment to make vintage art from any image with this 12 minute video tutorial. You’ll find out how to use masks and adjustment layers to lighten and darken areas of an image to get great results. You’ll also walk through how to create a reusable noise layer – and why using a fill layer makes better sense than filling a layer with color.

04. How to Make a Retro, Cajun-style, Tattoo Logo Design

Photoshop tutorial: How to make a retro, Cajun-style tattoo logo design

Marty from Blue Lightening TV shares some best-practice techniques for creating a retro logo design in this brilliant, bite-sized video tutorial (it’s less than seven minutes long). You’ll need a concrete texture to follow the steps – we have 10 free ones you can choose from on our Freebies page .

05. How to create textured, Golden Book-style images in Photoshop

06. how to make a pop art-style comic book cartoon.

Another one by Marty from Blue Lightening TV – this time he shares some best-practice techniques for transforming a photograph into a classic, pop art-style comic page in this fantastic 10-minute video tutorial. He’s using Photoshop CC 2014 – if you’re using Photoshop CC 2015, try his Warhol-style portrait tutorial instead.

07. Make interesting vector shapes in Photoshop CS6

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: vector shapes

Quickly create retro shapes and patterns with designer Luke O’Neill’s top tips for working with vector shape layers in Photoshop CS6.

08. Create handmade textures and shading effects

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: handmade textures

Add depth to a flat-looking piece of digital artwork by combining textures with subtle shading and highlights. This tutorial shows you the Photoshop techniques you need.

09. Add a vintage feel with custom brush strokes

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: custom brush strokes


Peter O’Toole reveals how to increase the depth of your vintage illustrations with handmade brush strokes in Photoshop.

10. Master vintage collage techniques in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: collage techniques

Tim Green walks through how to use photos to create surreal montages that have that authentic washed-out vintage look.

11. Create retro poster effects in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: tattoo-style art

Ollie Munden and Harriet Seed cover a number of techniques for creating tattoo-style art, based on 50s rockabilly and navy motifs in this Photoshop tutorial, which walks through how to create a vintage-style poster.

12. Create a Retro Photo Collage Illustration

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: photo collage

Tom Kemp Starley reveals how to create a surreal, 1940s-inspired composition using a mix of photos and graphics, the Warp tool, Curves and brushes.

13. How to Create 1980s type effects in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: 1980s

Channel the 1980s to create type-based retro-futuristic artwork with a textured, vintage feel.

14. How to Install Brush Tool Presets .tpl into Photoshop

Tutorial: How to Install Brush Tool Presets .tpl into Photoshop

Retro and vintage styles

15. how to create a matchbook print effect in photoshop.

Retro Photoshop tutorial: How to Create a Matchbook Print Effect

Matchbooks and matchboxes became popular as advertising vehicles in the 1950s. Find out how to quickly recreate a vintage matchbook print effect using just a few textures and Photoshop filters (and get your hands on a few quality free resources at the same time) with this 10-minute tutorial.

16. How to Create a Wood Type Inspired Design in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: How to Create a Wood Type Inspired Design

Add an organic, handmade feel to your designs with this video tutorial, which walks through how to create wood type effects in Photoshop. You can follow along using a free sample pack, which includes free Photoshop styles, brushes, splatters and even the background artwork for you to use however you like.

17. How to Turn a photo into pixel art

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro pixel art

Learn how to turn a photo of a person into pixel art as a fictional arcade game character from the early 90s.

18. Create dynamic art using glows and lighting effects

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorial: Create dynamic art using glows and lighting effects

New York-based illustrator Kervin Brisseaux shares his techniques for creating a sports illustration with a retro-futuristic sci-fi look.

19. Create retro low-poly art in Photoshop

Retro tutorial: Create low-poly art in Photoshop

Damien Vignaux (aka Elroy) explains how to use faux 3D modelling and Photoshop texturing to create a striking vintage-style low-poly artwork.

20. Give your Illustrations a Retro Look in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: 1950s advertising

Top illustrator Peter O'Toole shows you how to create a vintage aesthetic using textures, a limited colour palette and Photoshop’s Channel Mixer.

21. Make a Worn Vintage Beach Ad in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: vintage beach ad

Create a worn out, low-saturation vintage beach ad with this beginner to intermediate level Photoshop tutorial.

22. Design a Vintage Baseball Card in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: baseball card

Combine images, textures, blending modes and adjustment layers to achieve a realistic vintage baseball card.

Retro and vintage typography tutorials

23. create outrun retro-futuristic pixel text effect.

Best retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials

Find out how to create an Outrun-style retro-futuristic text effect from scratch in this Photoshop tutorial. You’ll walk through how to use a mixture of gradients, textures, colors, fonts, grain, shadows and more to create a cool retro-futuristic effect.

24. Hand Lettering 101: A Super Brief Guide with Bonus Free Brushes

Hand Lettering 101 tutorial: A Super Brief Guide with Bonus Free Brushes

Nail the basics and create stunning, vintage hand-lettering with this easy-to-follow tutorial. It comes with a pack of six free Photoshop brushes to help you get started…

25. Create a Gritty Vintage Poster in Photoshop

Best retro and vintage tutorials: gritty poster

Design Cuts walk through how to use intake design elements to create an ad for an old school garage and repairs shop in this helpful Photoshop tutorial. As well as working with textures, typefaces and other design elements, you’ll learn some very handy Photoshop tips and tricks that you can apply to your own projects.

(If you need some retro design elements to follow this tutorial, be sure to check out our collection.)

26. Vector Line Gradients

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: line gradients

Recreate the line gradient effect that you sometimes see in wood engravings and sign lettering with this 10-step vintage text tutorial. You can apply the effect to any type that you like for an authentic retro feel.

27. Create an 80's Style Chrome Logo Text Effect in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: How To Create an 80s Style Chrome Logo Text Effect

Chris Spooner goes back to the 1980s to show you how to produce an 80s-style chrome text effect, mixing layer style and color overlays to get to the final result.

28. How to use Photoshop’s Match Font feature

Tutorial: How to use Photoshop’s Match Font feature

Luke O’Neill runs through how to use the new Match Font feature in Photoshop, and how to get the best results out of it.

29. Create retro 3D type using Photoshop CS6

Tutorial: Create retro 3D type using Photoshop CS6

3D artist Craig Minchington looks at how to design elegant 3D type using the new tools in Photoshop CS6.

30. Spice up 3D type in Photoshop

Retro Photoshop tutorial: Spice up 3D type

Thomas Burden explains how to add texture to lifeless renders of 3D elements to create a Tom Waits-inspired piece, with a grubby old-school New York coffee house aesthetic.

31. Create a Retro 80s VHS Style Text Effect

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: 80s VHS typography

Celebrate the 80s with this retro Photoshop tutorial for creating a 1980s VHS image-style.

32. Create a Trendy Vintage Landscape Design

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: landscape

Capture the abstract theme of old album art by following this step-by-step Photoshop tutorial for manipulating a landscape photo with various color adjustments in Photoshop, and integrating typography.

33. Create a Retro Gold Leather Text Effect

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: gold leather effect

Use the shape attributes in Photoshop CC, along with a couple of layer styles, to quickly and easily create a retro, leather-like, 3D text effect.

34. Create a Funky Retro Wavy Text Effect

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: wavy text effect

Learn how to mask out an image so that it just shows through the editable text, making it friendlier to modifications later on, in this tutorial for creating a retro-colored psychedelic text effect.

35. Create a Mech-Inspired Text Effect with Layer Styles

Retro and vintage tutorial: Create a Mech-Inspired Text Effect in Photoshop

Jan Stverak explains how to create a mech-inspired text effect using layer styles in Photoshop.

36. Create a 3D Typographic Illustration in Cinema 4D and Photoshop

Retro and vintage tutorials: Create a 3D Typographic Illustration in Cinema 4D and Photoshop

In this advanced tutorial, João Oliveira explains how to create a 3D typographic illustration using Cinema 4D to build the 3D and Photoshop for the post-production.

Retro and vintage posters

37. how to create a retro boxing poster in photoshop.

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: boxing posters

Recreate a 1960s-style boxing poster and brush up on some basic graphic design principles in this 21-step Photoshop tutorial.

38. Create a Raw Horror Movie Poster Design

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: horror poster

Dig out your most grungy brushes and textures to design an old-school, low-fi horror movie poster this Halloween.

39. Make a Retro Space Themed Poster in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro-futuristic poster

Combine stock photos, textures and brushes with blend mode techniques and filters to create a striking vintage-style poster design.

40. Create a Retro-Futuristic Space Poster in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: space poster

Give your illustrations a retro-futuristic style with this Photoshop tutorial, which walks through how to create a space-themed poster design with intense lighting effects and distressed textures.

41. How to Create a Retro Sci-Fi Computer Game Poster

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro game

Combine stock photos and distressed, grungy textures to create a retro futuristic poster design.

42. Create a Retro Urban Gig Poster in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: gig poster

Andrea Austoni walks through how to create an atmospheric, textured poster for a rave in this video Photoshop tutorial.

Retro and vintage photography tutorials

43. how to use stock photography creatively.

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: How to use stock photography creatively within your design work

Get creative with stock, with this essential tutorial for quickly creating stunning designs using stock imagery.

44. Master Photoshop layer effects

Retro and vintage tutorials: Master Photoshop layer effects

Designer and illustrator James White walks through how to add a bold, pop culture retro flair to a photo using Photoshop's filters and layer styles.

45. How to Create a Natural Pastel Photo Effect

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: pastel photography

Add depth to your images while keeping them neutral, with this handy Photoshop tutorial for creating a pastel photo effect.

46. Design a Music Festival Poster in Photoshop

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: vintage Swiss style poster

Learn how to turn digital photos into imperfect analog photos with light leaks, dark vignettes and blurred focus, before creating patterns, mixing images, textures and blend modes to achieve a vintage Swiss-style poster design.

Photoshop and Illustrator tutorials

47. easy ways to add texture to vector graphics in photoshop.

Retro and vintage tutorials: Easy ways to add texture to vector graphics in Photoshop

Luke O’Neil demonstrates how to quickly create striking graphic backgrounds that will bring your designs to life, using Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign.

48. Create a Dark Vintage Motorcycle Poster Design

Retro Photoshop tutorial: Create a Dark Vintage Style Motorcycle Poster Design

Combine photography and typography to create a dark, vintage-style motorcycle poster design in this step-by-step Photoshop and Illustrator tutorial.

49. Create an Easy Abstract Blur Pattern Design

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: How To Create an Easy Abstract Blur Pattern Design

Design your own abstract gradient pattern art using a mixture of Photoshop and Illustrator techniques.

50. Create Retro-Style Geometric Line Artwork

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro geometric lines

Create retro-style interweaving geometric-line artwork in Illustrator and add a vintage, aged look in Photoshop.

51. How To Create a Retro Style Race Poster

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: race style poster

Switch between Illustrator and Photoshop to create a retro and vintage poster design with screenprint effects.

52. Create a Retro-Style Typographic Poster Design

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro typography

Transform crisp, clean vector art into a vintage, screenprint-style, typographic poster design with distressed textures and a muted color scheme.

53. Create Abstract Geometric Photo Collage Art

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: geometric photo collage

Transform a photograph into an abstract collage of geometric shapes, using Illustrator and Photoshop.

54. Design a Retro Postcard with 3D Text

Retro and vintage Photoshop tutorials: retro postcard

Recreate the vintage postcard style of image-based 3D text – each letter has a different image – with this tutorial for creating retro postcards.

55. How to Create a Distressed Retro Logo in Illustrator and Photoshop

Tutorial: How to Create a Distressed Retro Logo in Illustrator and Photoshop

ATTENTION DESIGNERS AND ILLUSTRATORS! If you’re looking for affordable, high-quality design goods for Photoshop and Illustrator, check out our full selection of unique retro and vintage design resources, including brushes, actions, textures, fonts and more . 

RapidFireArt

Learn How to Draw Using RFA’s Step-by-Step Tutorials!

how to make 50s art

Hi, my name is Darlene Nguyen and I created this website to help YOU learn to draw! Each tutorial on RFA is made with love and follows a step-by-step format that is detailed, yet simple and easy to understand. Learn how to draw realistic pencil art today!

THUMBNAIL How to Sketch for Beginners 324x235 3

Are you a beginner and don’t know where to start? Try my free drawing course and learn how to draw today! No sign-up or email needed :) Click here to get started!

Free Drawing Tutorials

how to make 50s art

7 steps to draw noses from the 3/4 view

How to Draw a Realistic Eye From the Side

How Draw a Realistic Eye From the Side

how to make 50s art

How to draw short hair (very detailed)

how to draw a face from the side thumbnail 324x235

How to draw a face from the side – 10 steps

how to make 50s art

How to draw a nose from the side – 6 steps

how to draw eyebrows

How to draw eyebrows on paper

how to make 50s art

How to Make Drawings POP!

how to make 50s art

How to Draw Faces for Beginners – SIMPLE

How to Draw a Face from the Front_Loomis Method for Drawing the Face from any angle

How to Draw a Face from the FRONT (Loomis Method)

how to make 50s art

How to draw a nose from the front – 7 easy steps

Introduction Pencil Shading Techniques

Pencil Shading Techniques Intro

how to draw an ear from the front

How to draw an ear from the front

how to draw a face from the side view _ Loomis Method

How to Draw a Face from the SIDE (Loomis Method)

how to draw a smile with teeth

How to draw a smile with teeth – 7 easy steps

how to make 50s art

How to draw lips from the side

how to make 50s art

How to draw lips from the 3/4 view

how to draw closed eyes

How to Draw Closed Eyes

how to make 50s art

How to draw eyelashes

how to make 50s art

How to draw hands part 2 – Beyond structure

how to make 50s art

How to Draw a Pair of Realistic Eyes

how to make 50s art

Inktober 2017 – My Submissions

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Beginner’s guide to graphite drawing pencils

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8 unique gifts for artists

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How to make an artist website in 5 EASY steps

Drawing techniques & tips.

Introduction Pencil Shading Techniques

Drawing technique #1: Shadow lining

how to make 50s art

3 exercises to improve your drawing skills

how to make 50s art

What is a kneaded eraser – How do you use one?

how to make 50s art

Detailed guide: How to use a blending stump

Create an Authentic, Retro Style Advert

how to make 50s art

WHAT WE’RE CREATING:

Hello Design Cutters!

Jo here. Today, we’re entering a bit of a vintage design vortex by creating an advert for a vintage themed ‘Parfumerie Fayre’ event, in a retro 50’s style. Using the first ever version of Photoshop for some extra vintage flair… (just kidding)! :p

early photoshp

We’ll be looking at how to combine the variety of resources available in the current vintage bundle and what techniques and pointers to consider so that you can create authentic looking vintage designs.

Quick note: In this tutorial, the term “clipping” or “clipped layer” is used a few times. This means that the layer is only visible/applies to the layer directly below it. You can very quickly do this by holding ‘Alt’ down on your keyboard and clicking between the two layers. Here’s a quick demonstration .

Ok, let’s get started!

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Follow along with this tutorial: Download the freebies

We’ve got a huge freebie for you today thanks to the good folks at Piddix and 2 Lil Owls, who have generously donated a selection of papers, textures, images, type and labels (just to name a few!) to help you follow along with the tutorial.

Remember, this freebie is just a tiny sample taken from this giant bundle: Beautiful, Rare Library of Authentic Vintage Design Treasures at just $28 (a huge 97% Off). This is our biggest, most varied vintage bundle to date, covering over two centuries worth of gorgeous design items.

Enter your email below to download the freebie, so you can follow along with this tutorial easily.

Visit the Freebie Page For This Tutorial

First up, create a new a new (A4) 3508px height x 2480px width document in Photoshop.

We want to create a really tactile, aged paper effect background to make our design look like it’s been torn straight out of a 1950s magazine. Luckily, we have a huge range of vintage papers to choose from in this bundle to help us out! In this instance we’ll use 2LO Dirty grunge 2 – 11.jpg from the freebies selection. Paste on to your canvas, scaling to fit:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

This has got a great texture and some nice marks, but is perhaps a bit dark in colour. To lighten this up and add a few more textural touches in the process, we’ll use another paper with the Soft Light filter. Grab Paper1700s_1754e_piddix.jpg , our second paper image from the freebies, again pasting on to your canvas, scaling to fit:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Change the blend mode to Soft Light for our overall effect:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Now we’ve created our ideal vintage paper effect, let’s keep it neat and easy to find by grouping the layers together in a folder called “Background”.

Another great way of creating an authentic aged look to printed materials is to use screen textures. This can recreate the realistic faded, scuffed and general wear and tear you’d expect on vintage paper prints.

We’ll create our own screen texture from the abundance of paper resources available in the bundle, as it’s super easy to do :)

First we want to find our paper source, ideally something with some nice marks, scratches and a good level of contrast. When considering a paper to use for a screen texture, remember to think in ‘reverse’. In other words, the darker areas will form the faded, lighter areas of the screen. In this case, we’e using 2LO Dirty grunge 4.jpg from the freebies pack. Again, paste on to your canvas and scale to fit:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Next, we need to rasterize the layer in order to invert the colour, which you can do via Image > Adjustments > Invert (alternatively “cmd + I” on mac, “ctrl + I” on windows):

Vintage Advert Tutorial

To remove the blue tint on the image, we’re going to apply a clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer so that we have a neutral screen effect (no sneaky colour tints!):

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 0 Saturation: 0 Lightness: 0

This gives us a completely grayscale image.

Vintage Advert Tutorial

The final step in creating the screen texture is to alter the Levels and increase the contrast. We can do this by adding a clipped Levels Adjustment Layer above the hue/saturation, which allows us to easily tweak it later if needed. For now though, use the following settings:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Levels Settings: Black Point: 0 Midtones: 1.00 White Point: 160

You can see this gives us a much grittier, higher contrast image where we can really make out the details:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Then, change the blend mode of the original image layer (not the adjustment layers) to Screen:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We can’t really see much of the effect yet, but since we know we want to include a screen effect on our work, it’ll make the design process easier being able to accomodate for it from the start. Group the screen layers together in a folder called “Screen” and lock the group to the top of your layers panel.

Now we’re ready to go retro :)

We’ll start by setting up a few guides to give us a plain border around our work and help with the layout. Position a guide at 5mm in from each edge:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

From here, we’ll create our 50s style header. Select #92C3C9 as the foreground colour and use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to draw a rectangle that’s just over one-third of the top of the page:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Press ‘alt + delete’ on your keyboard to fill with our foreground colour, then change the blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

You can see the difference the screen texture makes once we start adding colour:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Next, we’re going to add some pattern using a layer mask to create a damask wallpaper effect. We’ll do this using one of the 2 Lil Owls brushes that are included in the bundle. If you’ve not already, install the brush set from here: Authentic-Vintage-2-Lil-Vintage-Brush-sets-1 > 2LO-epherema collage > 2LO – epherema collage.abr

Create a Layer Mask, then select the following brush from the set (just after the big spots), changing the size to about 3920px:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Set the mask brush colour to #989898, as we don’t want to entirely mask out the colour. Then, use the brush to ‘stamp’ the pattern on to our colour block:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Retro adverts, particularly from the 50s and early 60s like we’re referencing here, are often instantly recognisable from their illustration style – especially of people. By having a library of authentic images to use, we have a huge advantage in making our design look truly realistic. See it as our secret weapon ;)

We’ll be using the following image of this dapper couple for our advert design, which you can find in the freebies pack: MidCenturyPeople_5039_piddix.jpg

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Paste the image on to your canvas and change the blend mode to multiply so we can see where to align the edge of the image to the edge of our header block. Scale to a similar size as below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Going back to our layer mask on our colour block layer, we need to mask out the background behind our couple. Choose a slightly rough-edged, painterly brush for a softer edge and to help recreate the ‘fluffy’ outline of the woman’s coat, and set the colour to black:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We now want to add a bit of retro text to our advert. A great retro font is the ever popular Lobster (which you can download free or choose to donate), which is used a few times in this design. A chunky, casual script style font would also work as an alternative.

Set the font size to 60pt and the colour to #E4D7C1, which was colour-picked from our paper background for continuity. Type “Darling,”:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We want to give the text a bit of emphasis with an italic style, but the ‘Lobster’ font set doesn’t come with an italic option… Not to worry! Photoshop has us covered in their Character Panel:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Select the “Darling,” text and apply the Faux Italic option (circled) which will add a ‘fake’ italic effect by slanting the text for us.

After applying the effect, move and tilt the text using the Transform tool to a similar position as below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll add a simple drop shadow effect by duplicating the layer, changing the text colour to #7FB9C0 and blend mode to Multiply. Move the layer below the original text and nudge it down and right slightly using the arrow keys:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Next we’ll add a slightly tongue-in-cheek strapline, another common feature of adverts from this period. As this is for a ‘Vintage Parfumerie Fayre’ we’ll go for “The past has never smelled so sweet…”. (*badum tsk*)

Use a bold, serif font such as ‘Alegreya SC Bold’ and set it to italic, with the colour as #A39261. Add a few spaces on the new line which starts with “smelled”, then set the layer blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’re not quite finished with the header just yet, but we need to add a separate design element before we can continue.

To add to the advertising and promotional theme of this piece, let’s add a sponsor logo. We’re going to use 2LO Vintage Whiskey 4.jpg from the freebies, as the colours fit in perfectly with our design so far:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Paste on to your canvas and switch the blend mode to Multiply. Use the guides to scale and position so it’s similar to below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Using the same font as we did in our strapline (“The past has never…”) type “Sponsored by” above the label and change the text colour to #282424, setting the layer blend mode to Multiply. Use the Transform tool to scale the text manually so that it matches the width of the label:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Group the two layers in to a folder called “Sponsors” to keep things tidy and easy to find.

Going back to our header image, we can now add a little extra decoration featuring our sponsor logo.

From the freebies, grab the following Frames_12394_piddix image:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Paste on to your canvas and set the layer blend mode to Multiply. Scale and position so that it’s similar to the image below, filling up the remaining space in the header:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

The black looks a little stark compared to the rest of the header, so we’ll use a clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer to help tie it in. Create the clipped Adjustment Layer, and apply the following settings:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 47 Saturation: 30 Lightness: +20

Next, we want to include the sponsor logo within the frame. We’ll do this by duplicating the label we used earlier and changing the blend mode to Soft Light. This way, we can see where to position it within the frame:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll create a layer mask to only display the part of the logo we want within the frame. On the layer mask, use the Elliptical Marquee Tool to draw an ellipse that matches the shape and size of the frame as closely as possible. Press ‘cmd + I’ (‘ctrl + I’ on Windows) to inverse the selection so that the entire area outside the frame is selected to mask:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Make sure black is selected as the foreground colour, then hit ‘alt + delete’ on your keyboard to mask the area:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Once the mask has been applied, duplicate the layer and change the blend mode to Multiply. Drop the opacity to 80% to complete the effect:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Group all the layers that make up the header in to a folder called “Header Image” to keep everything easy to find as we continue to build up our image!

From the freebies pack paste the AirMailEnvelopes_12919_piddix image on to your canvas as follows, setting the blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Duplicate the layer, then hide the original. This is so that we have a ‘back up’ as we’ll be rasterizing the layer and using the Background Eraser tool.

Rasterize the duplicated layer, then use the Background Eraser tool to remove as much of the paper as possible:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Finish off by using a layer mask to hide any creases missed by the background eraser and the text on the envelope. We want to create a corner border, so use the mask to neaten up the remaining edges:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

The pattern looks great, but the colour stands out a bit as it is. We’ll create a hue/saturation clipped Adjustment Layer to bring this closer to our existing palette:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: Off Hue: +180 Saturation: -65 Lightness: +25

To fill the gap to the left along the bottom, we’ll duplicate the layer along with the hue/saturation Adjustment Layer. Update the Layer Mask to hide everything other than the bottom border, then use the Transform tool to stretch the image to fit and position so that it joins up along the bottom. You may need to use the Layer Mask to carefully remove any visible overlap, so that it looks as seamless as possible:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll do the housekeeping here by putting the layers in to a group called “Envelope Edge”.

This would also be a good time to take a little break if you haven’t already :) Grab a glass of water, stretch your legs and give your eyes a rest from the screen and we’ll move on to adding some cool vintage fonts once you’re refreshed and ready!

A really nice resource in this bundle are the vintage typographic posters, which we can use to add some authentic text to our designs.

As these aren’t an actual font we can install, they’re better suited to shorter text such as headlines, unless of course, you are extremely patient :). In this step, we’ll go through the quickest way to extract the fonts from the posters to use on our own design.

We’re going to create the word “Vintage” using the typography from one of the posters included in our freebie bundle, TypePosters_13086_piddix.jpg :

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Open the image up in it’s own Photoshop document, then zoom in to the line which reads “Noted Teacher is Visiting School”:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

This is because the line contains all the letters we need to create the word “Vintage” and we won’t need to adjust the size of individual letters, helping us to save time and keep consistency.

On the poster document, select the Magic Wand tool and set the tolerance as 100. Then, click on any black area of the letter “V”:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Copy the selection, then move back to your working document and paste on to your canvas:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Repeat for the rest of the letters, then position to spell out the desired word. Take care to make sure the letters sit on a straight a line as possible, setting up guides to help if necessary:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Group the letters together to make them easy to find and keep things organised.

Once you’ve grouped your layers together, you can apply a clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer to your group to change the colour. Make sure the individual layers for each letter are set to Multiply, and the group itself to Pass Through. Then, create your hue/saturation Adjustment Layer with the following settings:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 170 Saturation: 20 Lightness: +45

Note: If your version of Photoshop doesn’t support clipped layers for groups, you’ll need to merge the group layers and apply the hue/saturation to that. Remember to create a hidden duplicate of your un-merged group first, just in case you need to go back to anything. You don’t want to pick out all the individual letters again!

For some more authentically vintage text, were going to borrow some typography straight from one of the perfume labels included in the freebie, 2LO Vintage Perfume 11.jpeg

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Open up the file in its own Photoshop document, then crop the image as tightly round the word “Parfumerie” as possible:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Then, use a combination of the Background Eraser tool and Eraser tool to isolate the word:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Copy and paste on to your working canvas, changing the blend mode to Multiply. Scale and postion so that it sits similarly to the image below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll change the text colour to the dark gold used elsewhere in the design with a hue/saturation clipped Adjustment Layer with the following settings:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 50 Saturation: 25 Lightness: +15

We’ll continue our text with another typography set from our freebie posters, this time TypePosters_13089_piddix.jpg :

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Use the same approach as we did to create the word “Vintage”, adjusting the size of any letters as required so that they are all the same height:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

As we did for the word “Vintage”, group the letters together making sure the individual letter layers are set to Multiply, and the group as Pass Through. Apply a hue/saturation clipped Adjustment Layer with the same settings:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Next, we’ll add a few finishing touches to complete our event title text. Using the same font and colour as you did for the strapline in the header, type “Presenting the 1st Annual” with the font style set to italic. Scale and position so that it sits in the space between the word “Parfumerie” and the bottom of the header, then set the blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll also add some floral decoration to continue the fragrant theme. From the freebies, copy and paste the following image, 2LO Vintage Ephemera 7-6.png , on to your canvas so it’s positioned at the end of the word “Parfumerie”:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Set the blend mode to Multiply and the Opacity to 85%:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Duplicate the layer, then rotate 180 degrees and position at the beginning of the word “Fayre” to create some balance:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Great stuff! Let’s group all those together in a folder called “Vintage Parfumerie Fayre” so we can find everything much easier.

Demonstrating how to party, vintage style, we’ll use another great illustration from our freebies pack, Party_11951_piddix :

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Paste the image on to your canvas, changing the blend mode to Multiply. Then, scale and position so that it sits underneath the word “Vintage” and the width doesn’t exceed that of the sponsor logo:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll soften this up and pick out some of the contrasting pink tones from the illustration of the couple in the header, by creating a clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 0 Saturation: 45 Lightness: +65

We’ll finish off this step by typing “Drinks & Dancing” in the same font used for the strapline, but this time taking away the bold and italic styling. Set the font colour as #313030 and the blend mode to Multiply, then scale and position to fit like in the image below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’re starting to build up a busy, grid based layout for the lower part of our design, which is a common feature of a lot of vintage adverts. We’ll continue this with a column of text promoting the event and providing some details.

With the Type tool selected, click and drag to form a narrow text box:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

You can then create your own retro-inspired advert text to fill it with, or copy and paste the below:

Ladies! Come and join us for an evening of spectacular scents from centuries past!

Presenting the first Annual Gold Seal Vintage Parfumerie Fayre, you’ll be treated to a night of drinks, dancing and divine fragrances.

Tell your sweetheart the past has never smelled so sweet!

Date: Friday 11th May Time: 5.30pm – 11pm Cost: £2.50

Venue: Main Hall, London, E6

Use the Paragraph panel to set the text to fill the width of the text box, with the final line justified left. Use the same font as you have been doing for the standard text, just changing the first word, “Ladies!” to the same font as we used for “Darling,” in the header.

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Set the blend mode to Multiply, and we’re making good progress on our authentic looking ad!

Vintage Advert Tutorial

We’ll up the vintage factor some more by including some examples of the lovely perfume labels which will be featuring in our fictional event. You can find these in the freebies bundle as 2LO Vintage Perfume 1.jpeg , 2LO Vintage Perfume 9.jpeg and 2LO Vintage Perfume 12.jpeg :

Vintage Advert Tutorial

These labels work well in our design because the colours are similar to our existing palette. Paste the three images on to your canvas, changing the blend mode to Multiply. Scale and position so that they sit similarly to the image below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Finally for this step, type “A selection of fragrances from centuries past!” to sit below the labels. Set the layer blend mode to Multiply, and the justification to the right:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Keeping up our end-of-step housekeeping, group the layers in to folder called “Perfumes”.

We’re now entering the final few stages!

Since illustrated elements feature strongly in most vintage adverts, and because we have such a fantastic selection of them to choose from in this bundle, we’ll add one more…

From the freebies, select MidCenturyEngravingsGrey_13096_piddix.jpg , and paste in to the lower right corner of your canvas, setting the blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

The cocktail glass helps reflect the ‘drinks’ part of the event, and adds a sense of fun as the universal symbol for “a bit of a party” ;)

The black is a bit harsh for our design though, so we’ll correct this with another clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer:

Hue/Saturation Settings: Colourize: On Hue: 175 Saturation: 20 Lightness: +35

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Next, we’ll use a very cool vintage calendar resource that’s included in the freebie, OfficeEphemera_12908_piddix.jpg :

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Paste this on to your canvas, again setting the blend mode to Multiply to allow that vintage paper texture through.

Scale, position and rotate so that it’s peeking out from behind the cocktail glass, similar to the image below:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Type “Save the date!” in the same bold font and colour as we did for the strapline, scaling and rotating so that it sits below the calendar, following the same angle:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

To finish off this step, we’ll emphasise the ‘save the date’ instruction by circling the specified date on the calendar.

Select #E25858 as the colour, and choose a small brush that mimics a pencil or pen stroke to draw a freehand circle around the date, then change the blend mode to Multiply:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

For our final step, we’ll add a simple finishing touch that adds authenticity by paying attention to detail. Since we’ve been creating a design that looks like an advert that would be found in a retro magazine, let’s add a page number in the corner.

Using a thinner or regular version of the main font you’ve been using for this design, type “P. 31” (or of course, any number you like) in the lower right corner of the canvas:

Vintage Advert Tutorial

Make sure the colour is the same #313030 grey as we’ve been using for much of the text, and that the layer blend mode is Multiply.

And we’re done!

Vintage Advert Tutorial

I really hope you enjoyed doing this tutorial, and got some inspiration for how you can use the resources in this bundle to create some authentic looking, vintage inspired designs!

If you’ve got any comments or questions, do leave them below and I’ll keep an eye out. Also, feel free to get in touch @rockportraits .

Remember to share your own creations on the Facebook page too, as we love seeing your own personal take on the tutorials and how you’ve used the resources for your own work :)

Hopefully this tutorial showed you just some of the ways you can use the huge variety of vintage resources available in this bundle – the possibilities are really endless! Remember you can get this huge, centuries-spanning bundle for 97% off this week! There are literally thousands of rare, beautiful vintage design resources included, and you’ll be saving over $1000, getting them all for just $28! Grab it below, while you still can:

Beautiful, Rare Library of Authentic Vintage Design Treasures

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16 lovely comments from our community

I’m struggling with this and crying for help. I don’t think there is a youtube tutorial on it. When you say “Then, change the blend mode of the original image layer (not the adjustment layers) to Screen:”, do you mean the layer called “2LO Dirty grunge 2 – 11.jpg”? Since that layer is already in a folder called “background”, do I then have to change the name of that folder to “Screen”? Is a “clipped hue/saturation Adjustment Layer” the same as just a “hue/saturation Adjustment Layer “?

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave us a comment and I am so sorry to hear that you’re having issues with this tutorial!

I’ve just popped you over an email to find out some more information from you, then I can certainly help :)

It seems every time I can’t get past the instruction immediately before Step 3. It reads “Then, change the blend mode of the original image layer (not the adjustment layers) to Screen:” Which I do, but instead of the canvas turning light tan (as your example shows), my canvas turns blank/white. In Photoshop, when I look at the preview window of the layer after switching the blend to “Screen,” it looks correct. When I actually click the “Apply” button, my canvas does not appear as it did in the preview, nor does it look like your example. I’ve restarted from the beginning multiple times in order to check if I’ve done anything wrong, but the same result continues to occur. I would love to hear back, any help would be truly appreciated!

Hey Tanner,

I am so sorry that you are experiencing issues whilst following along with this one!

I have just popped you over an email now to get some more information from you, so that I can help you with this :)

Hiya, I am having the same problem could you help me sort this? Thank you!

Hey Kellie,

Thanks for getting in touch and I am sorry to hear that you are having some trouble with these resources. Rest assured I can certainly help with this and have just popped you an email with some more information!

It is a very nice tutorial but I can’t find “Authentic-Vintage-2-Lil-Vintage-Brush-sets-1 > 2LO-epherema collage > 2LO – epherema collage.abr” so it is not easy to finish this tutorial.

Thank you for your comment, I am so sorry for any confusion caused with this tutorial – unfortunately the .abr file is not featured in this freebie and is used as an example to show our community members how to use their resources from the Beautiful, Rare Library of Authentic Vintage Treasures bundle.

I apologise for this inconvenience, Arne, but I hope you were still able to enjoy this tutorial! If you do have any other questions or if there is ever anything I could assist you with please do get in touch. I’m always happy to help!

Just completed this excellent tutorial! I did not mind the missing elements. It provided the opportunity to improvise.

Thank you again for the tutorials!!!

So glad to hear that you have given the tutorial a go! Thanks so much for taking the time to let us know.

It’s so nice to hear that you where able to improvise with this too! I hope you had loads of fun with it.

I’m sending a big Hi-5 right back at you, thanks again Chris :)

This is a very detailed and thorough tutorial. It was very easy to follow, except for the instances where you ask us to use images from the freebie pack which aren’t in there! Needless to say, it throws in a wrench to the work because substitutes have to be found, and adjustments to them will then be different and result in a different end product. On the one hand, it’s good to be forced to experiment, on the other, it defeats the purpose of a tutorial and is frustrating to the person following it.

2LO Vintage Perfume 11.jpeg, 2LO Vintage Ephemera 7-6.png, and 2LO – epherema collage.abr are missing from the freebie pack (though you mention the last one is in the bundle as opposed to the freebie pack, so this one may be exempt).

Otherwise though, excellent tutorial.

Hey Blanche,

Thank you so much for your comment, and for making us aware of the missing file. I’m so sorry we didn’t include the 2LO Vintage Perfume 11.jpeg. I’ve updated the bundle now, so that all the resources are in it. The 2LO Vintage Ephemera 7-6.png, and 2LO – epherema collage.abr are however not included in this freebie set, as they are too large to be part of this freebie.

I have spoken to Tom though, and have asked him to try an make sure to always include all the resources that are being used in the tutorial in future the future.

I will email you now with the file, so you don’t have to re-download the entire bundle again.

Hello, I’d like to send me the compass of the package as well, since I downloaded came without. Thank you!

Hey Laryssa,

Thank you so much for getting back to Tina, I am so sorry for any inconvenience caused with accessing your bundle resources! Tina has updated these files now so you should be okay to download these items again but please do let me know if you have any issues with this and I will happily lend a hand!

I hope this helps, Laryssa, and please don’t hesitate to contact me should you have any other questions. I’m here to help!

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22 tips for 2022

Life Kit's here to help you start — and continue — this year feeling refreshed, motivated and well cared-for.

22 tips for 2022: Get creative, even if you aren't feeling inspired

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Malaka Gharib

Illustration of a person drawing in a journal and the frame filling with flowers pouring out of her notebook.

22 tips for 2022 features a daily action to help you kick-start the new year. Check out more from Life Kit .

There are lots of benefits to creating art: It can reduce stress and anxiety, and flexing your creative side can give a stronger sense of agency. Plus, being creative can also feel pretty awesome and help lift your mood.

But how do you get started if you don't feel the spark? Let go of expectations and set aside 10 minutes a day to create random art.

Experts say that's all you need to kick-start the habit, whether it's finger painting or cooking or baking or scrapbooking — whatever gets you excited.

Whatever you do, don't wait for creative inspiration to strike. "That's a myth that you'll create because you're in this altered state of mind and feeling free and loose," says Trinidad Escobar , a graphic novelist and poet based in Oakland, Calif.

Just make the time, and the art will follow.

Here's more on how to start a habit of making art .

22 tips for 2022 is edited and curated by Dalia Mortada, Arielle Retting, Janet W. Lee, Beck Harlan, Beth Donovan and Meghan Keane. This tip comes from an episode of Life Kit hosted by Malaka Gharib and produced by Audrey Nguyen.

  • Life Kit: Life Skills

Crafts to Make for a 50s Party

...

Even if you're not old enough to remember them, the aesthetics, products, culture and history of the 1950s are probably familiar to you, enough to invoke a sense of nostalgia. Creating an atmosphere to help bring about this feeling is a great basis for a themed party. In addition to using items such as food, music and costumes to evoke the feeling of this decade, create some handmade crafts for use in decorating and enhancing your event.

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For this craft, get a hold of some old, unwanted or scratched LP records and transform them into stylish 1950s-evocative serving bowls for your party snacks. To do this, bake them in a 400-degree oven while using two oven-safe bowls to shape them. Place the bowls upside down, one on top of the other, with the LP nested in between; bake for just a couple of minutes, watching to see when the LP melts into a bowl shape, causing the three bowls to nest. Remove the bowls with an oven mitt and let them cool.

1950s-style Jewelry

Create some 1950s-inspired jewelry crafts to wear yourself or give to your guests as party favors. Popular designs at that time included brooches, pendants and earrings made from clusters of angular, faceted rhinestones set in metal bases, as well as multitiered pearl necklaces and bracelets featuring beads of different sizes. (For more jewelry inspirations from that era, see Resources.)

Jukebox Standee

To give your party space an authentic 1950s café feel, create a two-dimensional cardboard jukebox standee to position in front of your stereo system while you play 1950s tunes. Use a large sheet of cardboard (such as a refrigerator box) and draft the jukebox outline in black permanent marker before filling in the colors with acrylic paint. If you can't draw this by hand, find some jukebox clip art (see Resources) and print it life-sized using several printer pages and pasting them together on the cardboard before painting.

Vintage Ad Place Mats

Use vintage 1950s artist-drafted print ads as place mats at a dinner party, giving each guest a different ad that will serve as visual interest and a conversation piece. Print the ads on computer paper for basic, disposable mats, or get the pages laminated if you want to make reusable place mats. Be sure to print with full color (where applicable) and to use a high-quality printer resolution to make the fine text on the ads readable.

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6 ways to make your own art at this year's art-a-whirl.

At this year's Art-A-Whirl, don't just look at the art — make the art that you want to see in the world.

The largest open studio tour in the country, this is the event's 29th year, with more than 1,300 Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association (NEMAA) artists, galleries and businesses participating. This year there are 32 interactive opportunities , so if none of these feels right, scan through the list and find one that works for you.

"Interactive activities allow us to touch the same materials the artists use and tap into our own creative energy," Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association Executive Director Anna Becker said. "The experience of making art yourself brings a new dimension to appreciating the work of others."

Artist Pearl Monroe helps people make DIY charms at this year's Art-A-Whirl. She sees charms as a form of self-expression.

Have you ever wanted to make your own charm but weren't sure where to start? Artist Pearl Monroe guides people, helping them make croc charms or typical pin-style charms. Just grab one of the 200 that are ready and start painting with acrylic marker. "I've been like a little gremlin, making as many as I can," Monroe said. "Charms give people the opportunity to express themselves and then to wear it away." (5-10 p.m. Fri., Noon-8 p.m. Sat., Noon-5 p.m. Sun., Casket Arts Building, Studio 115, 681 17th Av. NE., Mpls., 651-485-2274, ontheshelfstudio.com )

Stone Arch Glass Studio offers mini glass blowing classes at this year's Art-A-Whirl.

Mini Glass Blowing Classes

In these 20-minute classes, learn to use a torch and melt glass into small things like a marble, trinket or plant decoration rod. This is the first step before actual glass blowing. "It is kind of like melting and molding glass in this little opportunity," Studio Manager Rebecca Loughrey said. (1-5 p.m. Sat. & Sun., Stone Arch Glass Studio, 316 Buchanan St. NE., Mpls., 612-200-9605, stonearchstudio.com )

Photographer Jordan Weber wants to make people feel special and beautiful. Pose with flowers and become a part of her book project, and buy a digital copy of your portrait if you'd like.

'Portraits in Bloom'

Cost: Free, or $15 and up

Photographer Jordan Weber wants you to feel beautiful and surrounded with flowers. Get your picture taken for free, with an option to buy a digital copy for $15. Either way, the pictures she takes will be part of "Portraits in Bloom: A Celebration of Nature and You." "My whole brand is about building confidence in people, the everyday person — you don't have to be a model to look good in a photo shoot." She won't know which flowers she'll have until the day of the event. (Noon-8 p.m. Sat., Noon-5 p.m. Sun., Northrup King Building, Studio 179, 1500 Jackson St. NE., Mpls., jordanweberphotography.com )

In the spirit of artist Aldo Moroni, people can visit his studio and collaboratively create a tiny civilization out of clay.

Community Sculpture Project

Longtime Minneapolis artist Aldo Moroni loved using clay to create tiny civilizations in collaboration with community. That spirit lives on, even four years after his death. Studio manager Lisa Roy and Moroni's daughter Maxamillia organized this community sculpture project at his old corner studio in the California Building. People can come by, carve a block of clay donated by Continental Clay, and add to what they hope will be a 10-foot-long and 2- or 3-foot-wide sculpture. "I am envisioning a mountainscape, kind of like what Aldo would do," Roy said. Although it will be a temporary structure, that also fit with Aldo's practice; sometimes he would create a piece and, as part of the performance part, go in and destroy it. "The reason Aldo would do these projects is he thought everyone was an artist," she said. "It's a way to bring out the artist in everyone." (5-10 p.m. Fri., Noon-8 p.m. Sat., Noon-5 p.m. Sun., California Building, Studio 113, 2205 California St. NE., Mpls., 612-799-8077)

Liz Driessen and Bonnie Kehner make prints of Campbell Soup Cans at SuperCharged Printmakers.

Pop Art Printmaking

Love pop art so much that you want to make your very own print? SuperCharged Printmakers invites visitors to make two-color silkscreen prints of Warhol's iconic Campbell's Soup Cans. "I teach people to be loose and kind of like freeform so we can add some painterly strokes to the bottom layer, and put the top layer on so the black layer kind of fills everything in," said Genie Castro, director at SuperCharged Printmakers. (2-4 p.m. Sat., Casket Arts Building, Studio 119, 681 17th Av. NE., Mpls., 715-338-6766 or geniecastro.com )

A sample work from

'Ojo de Dios'

Artist Katie Ross wants to give people a chance to create an intention and manifest it through weaving. On a wooden stick, write the intention, which could be a positive affirmation or goal, and then pick some colored yarn to wrap around it. According to Ross, the color of the yarn "might represent their feelings on the intentions." Then take that piece home and let it all come true. (5-10 p.m. Fri., Noon-8 p.m. Sat., Noon-5 p.m. Sun., the Arts Creative, 7700 W. Old Shakopee Road, Suite 175, 952-210-5192 or theartscreative.com )

Deathsquads vs. Nur-D, etc.: Our critic's top Art-A-Whirl 2024 live music picks, hour by hour

Deathsquads vs. Nur-D, etc.: Our critic's top Art-A-Whirl 2024 live music picks, hour by hour

Alicia Eler  is the Star Tribune's visual art reporter and critic, and author of the book “The Selfie Generation. | Pronouns: she/they ”

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An art installation that features a mannequin wearing a suit that has faces painted on it, a neon sign that reads "Creative Growth" and a wall-size  photograph of a large group of people.

Critic’s Notebook

At SFMOMA, Disability Artwork Makes History

After 50 years, Creative Growth in Oakland celebrates as its artists enter the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s collection.

At the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition, “Creative Growth: The House That Art Built,” a mannequin wears an untitled piece by William Scott from 2020 (acrylic paint on suit jacket and pants). Right, a wall-size photo of Creative Growth artists and staff members. Credit... Don Ross, via San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Supported by

By Jonathan Griffin

Reporting from Oakland, Calif.

  • Published May 7, 2024 Updated May 8, 2024

In 1974, Florence Ludins-Katz and Elias Katz — she an artist, he a psychologist — turned the garage of their Berkeley home into an art studio for adults with developmental disabilities. Across California at that time, people with a range of disabilities were being deinstitutionalized, with little provision made for them after their release. The Katzes viewed art-making as a pathway not only to personal fulfillment for disabled people, but also to their integration into a society that valued their work.

Half a century on, Creative Growth — as the iconoclastic and influential studio in Oakland was named — is celebrating its 50th anniversary with an exhibition, “Creative Growth: The House That Art Built,” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition draws from SFMOMA’s half-million-dollar acquisition of more than 100 Creative Growth artworks, the largest purchase by any American museum of the work of disabled artists. The museum acquired 43 more pieces from Creative Growth’s sister organizations in California, also founded by the Katzes: Creativity Explored in San Francisco and NIAD (Nurturing Independence Through Artistic Development) in Richmond.

People sit around a table at work on various artworks.

Time was when such work would have been siloed in collections of “Outsider Art” or folk art. Over the past decade, however, it has been increasingly common to see art by developmentally disabled artists integrated, without contextual fanfare, into group shows or biennials. Cultural institutions, from the Museum of Modern Art to the Brooklyn Museum, have occasionally acquired examples of such work, although it is seldom exhibited except in special displays.

What is happening at SFMOMA is different. The acquisition is part of a partnership with Creative Growth through which the museum, led since 2022 by the director Christopher Bedford, pledges to introduce more art by developmentally disabled people from the three Bay Area organizations into its collection displays, and consequently into the canon of modernist art history.

Tom Eccles, executive director of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, calls the partnership “unprecedented.” The art historian Amanda Cachia — who writes on disability art — agrees, saying, “The canon as we know it is being reorganized to incorporate the voices of disabled artists who have long been excluded from these narratives. Museums have a long way to go in recognizing contemporary disability art.”

The partnership with SFMOMA, which began in late 2022, is a landmark achievement for Tom di Maria, who joined Creative Growth as its executive director in 1999 and has led the organization to become the most successful and widely recognized studio of its kind in the United States.

The exhibition “Creative Growth: The House That Art Built” opened April 5, showcasing nearly 70 standout works by 11 of the center’s hundreds of current and former artists, alongside a newly commissioned mural in the museum by the acclaimed Creative Growth artist William Scott.

The partnership constitutes the breach of the institution’s high walls that Creative Growth has been striving toward for years. While it may signal a turning point for disability arts, it also comes at a time of change for the organization, as di Maria, 65, looks to retirement and its staff has moved to unionize.

In 2019, di Maria tried to step back from his position as Creative Growth’s leader, first by sharing the position of director, then later moving into a director emeritus role. New appointments did not stay in leadership roles for long. The pandemic complicated matters further, interrupting Creative Growth’s operations. Since December, when the executive director, Ginger Shulick Porcella, left after 12 months, di Maria stepped in once again as interim executive director.

Di Maria tells me that this kind of leadership problem is common in art nonprofits, where long-term directors broadened their job descriptions as their organizations grew. “When they step away,” he said in an interview, “you’re looking for somebody that’s going to be the fund-raiser, the curatorial director, the HR person, the grant-writer, all in one.”

Under di Maria’s leadership, Creative Growth has evolved in ways that make it barely recognizable from the nonprofit he inherited. Its annual budget has risen to $3.4 million from $900,000 in 1999, about a third of which is raised from sales of the artists’ work. (Art sales totaled around $20,000 annually when he joined. When artists sell their work through Creative Growth, the organization takes a 50 percent cut.)

Di Maria has advanced the Katzes’ legacy by pushing to integrate the work made by Creative Growth artists into the mainstream commercial art world. During his tenure, artworks have been acquired by museums including the Pompidou Center in Paris, the Tate in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Two Creative Growth artists, Judith Scott and Dan Miller, exhibited in the 2017 Venice Biennale. Many others have had solo shows at respected commercial galleries across the world.

The sale of artworks by disabled people, di Maria says, is a means of “getting a seat at the table.” Collectors acquire often-inexpensive works, and become invested in the lives of the makers; dealers take notice, and put on shows; prices go up; museum boards promote the work they own to curators; work gets donated to museum collections. Once the art is inside the museum, the real work can begin: changing the way the public values and understands the lives of disabled artists.

On one level, the exhibition — organized by the SFMOMA curators Jenny Gheith and Nancy Lim — presents a social history of disability arts in the Bay Area and the Katzes’ groundbreaking initiatives. This story is told through a well-designed interpretive display in a new gallery called “Art in Your Life,” and in cases of ephemera such as fund-raising letters and event announcements that frame the exhibition in documentary terms.

On another level, however, it is a show of art as accomplished as any in the museum. The first gallery showcases work by three of Creative Growth’s pre-eminent figures, and one emerging talent. Dwight Mackintosh, who died in 1999, was one of the first artists from the organization to win international attention for his drawings. Using felt-tip and colored paint, in his looping hand, he drew groups of translucent figures often surrounded by a distinctive, intermittently legible script.

Mackintosh’s repetitive mark-making rhymes with the intensely overlaid words and shapes in drawings and paintings of Dan Miller, 62, and in an assemblage sculpture by Judith Scott, who died in 2005: a small chair wrapped with strips of fabric and twine, tying in other items including a basket and a bicycle wheel. Meanings are buried deeply in these works.

Do not confuse such practices with art therapy. Just like professional artists who work and rework a set of ideas and motifs, Mackintosh, Miller and Scott spent decades honing private languages, resulting in oeuvres that embody their powerful personal visions.

In that first gallery is also an arresting video by Susan Janow, 43, her first foray into the medium. In “Questions?” (2018), Janow stares into the camera, tight-lipped, while questions are asked of her (in a voice-over, also recorded by Janow), ranging from the banal — “Do you wear a watch?” — to the existential — “Do you trust others easily?” “Who do you miss?” “Where do you see yourself in 10 years?” Her art reveals that her interior life is shaped as much by inquiry as by confident conclusion.

Another highlight of the exhibition is a vivacious untitled abstract painting, from 2021, by the Berkeley-based Joseph Alef, 43. In an exhibition text, Alef explains that nonfigurative work makes it “easier to get all of the emotions out.” These texts admirably elucidate artists’ processes and approaches without disclosing the nature of their disabilities, which might risk skewing viewers’ interpretation of their art.

If some artists choose to share details of their lives through their art, that is their prerogative. Camille Holvoet, 71, who worked at Creative Growth until 2001, makes cheerfully frank, brightly colored drawings of her joys, anxieties and hopes. Created between 1987 and 1998, the pictures on view depict her medications, her fear of public transport, her experience of moving to a new group home, and — poignantly, in this context — a picture of a smiling woman next to stacks of cash and checks: “Making More as Mush Money as a Good Artist, Without No SSI Cuts and No Pay Tax.”

Ordinarily, I am not inclined toward such illustrative artwork. But Holvoet’s pictures achieve one of the most profound aims of the exhibition, and indeed of Creative Growth’s founders: to help disabled artists thrive as individuals with agency and potential. Whether an artist is using creative work to narrate their life story or to transcend their circumstances, making art is a deeply assertive act.

Exemplary is William Scott’s commissioned mural “Praise Frisco: Peace and Love in the City,” part of the museum’s “Bay Area Walls” series. Over the course of his artistic career, Scott, 59, has painted his vision of a utopian San Francisco of the future, a city he calls “Praise Frisco” which incorporates rejuvenated elements of his past. In his mural at SFMOMA, we see smiling, youthful versions of himself and his mother, alongside a spotless depiction of the Alice Griffith public housing development where he grew up. (Also present are green flying saucers, labeled “Wholesome Skyline Friendly Organizations.”)

Three days before this triumphant exhibition opened, di Maria received a letter from Creative Growth staff members announcing their intention to unionize. “Forming a union will help ensure more equitable hiring and pay practices, standardized benefits, greater protections, safer working conditions, and improved procedures around transparency and accountability,” it read.

Di Maria accepted unionization soon after, on April 11. In recent years, staff members at arts institutions across the country from museums to art schools have been unionizing. Sam Lefebvre, a part-time artist aide and member of the union Creative Growth United, told me that high turnover, owing to unsustainable working conditions, can negatively affect the artists, who may form close bonds with studio facilitators, and who often respond best to routine and stability.

At this moment of transition for both Creative Growth and SFMOMA, all eyes are on the future. Museums across the country are working to connect more deeply with their audiences, and by including and celebrating the work of disabled artists in their collections, they will better reflect the lives and experiences of all their visitors.

“One in four people in the United States identifies with disability,” the scholar Jessica Cooley, who writes on disability arts and museum studies, said in an interview. “Disability art and artists are already everywhere, in every collection, making incredible impacts on the art world.” SFMOMA’s partnership with Creative Growth can be seen just as an acknowledgment of the contributions disabled artists have made to art history.

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5 new gpt-4o features making chatgpt better than ever.

From real-time voice interaction to vision capabilities and multilingual support, we're a step closer to Star Trek-style conversational AI.

Key Takeaways

  • GPT-4o promises real-time voice interaction with multiple tones and voices for a more human-like experience.
  • Vision capabilities allow GPT-4o to answer questions about photos and screenshots, and should ultimately support video.
  • May 13 sees GPT-4o joining all ChatGPT tiers, but with differences in prompt limits and voice function availability.

On May 13, OpenAI officially launched GPT-4o, its next AI model. Since GPT-4 is already the basis of much of the hype around generative AI, 4o could be poised to send shockwaves throughout the industry. Here's everything that OpenAI revealed about the new AI technology, and why it's a big step forward.

How to use ChatGPT to make AI-generated art and images

1 real-time voice conversations, no keyboard required.

There's a strong focus on real-time voice exchanges with GPT-4o. The model can pick up on the tone in your voice, and will try to respond in an appropriate tone of its own. In some circumstances you can even ask it to add more or less drama to its response, or use a different voice -- like a robotic one for a story being told by a robot, or singing for the end of a fairytale.

Perhaps more significantly, you can interrupt the AI at any time, say if it's getting a request wrong, or you want to change its tone or voice mid-stream. 4o will do its best to correct itself, using the rest of a conversation as context. In a staged demonstration by OpenAI this all felt very natural, with the AI even apologizing when someone pointed out that it was missing some critical source data.

You'll have to wait to try the new voice features, unfortunately. They're initially deploying only to ChatGPT Plus subscribers, and only in an early alpha state sometime before the end of June.

6 ways to get Spotify Premium for free

2 better vision capabilities and multilingual support, words aren't always enough.

GPT-4o can also answer questions about photos and desktop screenshots. These may be similar to ones you'd ask Meta/Ray-Ban's Smart Glasses or the Humane AI pin -- something like "What brand of pants are these?" -- but are potentially more complex, such as explaining a block of app code, or translating a restaurant menu. OpenAI says that down the road, 4o may be capable of even more complicated tasks, such as watching live sports and explaining the rules involved. For now the focus appears to be on static images rather than video.

Related to vision are improved multilingual functions. 4o is claimed to have better performance across 50 different languages, with an API twice as fast as the one for GPT-4 Turbo.

Amazon's simple vision for the Echo Frames in an Apple Vision Pro era

3 you can create images with readable text, extending the possibilities of ai art.

Generating images with legible text has long been a weak point of AI, but GPT-4o appears more capable in this regard. Text can not only be legible, but arranged in creative ways, such as typewriter pages, a movie poster, or using poetic typography. It also appears to be adept at emulating handwriting, to the point that some prompts might create images indistinguishable from real human output.

Text can not only be legible, but arranged in creative ways, such as typewriter pages, a movie poster, or using poetic typography.

You can even ask 4o to include doodles in the margins.

With GPT-4o, ChatGPT can generate art with text that’s actually readable

4 native mac and windows apps, quicker, more powerful access.

Aside from the web version of ChatGPT, there's now a dedicated Mac app with keyboard shortcut and screenshot support, currently restricted to Plus subscribers. A Windows app should be available by the end of 2024. It could be that OpenAI isn't in a rush to put a first-party client in Windows 11 -- GPT is, after all, the foundation of Copilot , and Microsoft probably doesn't want its integrated Windows tech upstaged.

OpenAI finally has a ChatGPT desktop app. Mac users get first dibs

5 everyone can access gpt-4o for free, down with gatekeeping.

In a way, this may actually be the biggest advancement. OpenAI has traditionally gated the most cutting-edge versions of GPT, but 4o is free to every ChatGPT user from the start. The main limitations are on real-time voice conversation -- which is being restricted to Plus subscribers, once it actually rolls out -- and the number of prompts you can use. ChatGPT Plus and Team subscribers get five times the amount of prompts, which matters a great deal, since conversations revert to GPT-3.5 once your prompt limit is hit. You may need Plus if you expect GPT-4o to behave like the computer on the Enterprise.

I tested ChatGPT Plus against Copilot Pro to see which AI is better

Q: what is gpt-4o.

GPT-4o is an evolution of the GPT-4 AI model, currently used in services like OpenAI's own ChatGPT. The O stands for "omni" -- not because it's omniscient, but because it unifies voice, text, and vision. That contrasts with GPT-4, which is mostly about typed text interactions, exceptions like image generation and text-to-speech transcription notwithstanding.

Q: How and when is GPT-4o going to be available?

The model is coming to all tiers of ChatGPT as of May 13, including free users. There are some catches here -- ChatGPT Plus and Team subscribers get five times the amount of prompts, and for everyone, conversations fall back to GPT-3.5 once prompt limits are hit. Also, the new voice functions are initially deploying only to Plus subscribers, and only in an early alpha state sometime before the end of June. We'll see 4o enterprise features introduced around the same time.

It's not clear when we'll see GPT-4o migrate outside of ChatGPT, for example to Microsoft Copilot. But OpenAI is opening the chatbots in the GPT Store to free users, and it would be odd if third parties didn't leap on technology easily accessible through ChatGPT. The company is being cautious, however -- for its voice and video tech, it's beginning with "a small group of trusted partners," citing the possibility of abuse.

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  • Weight loss

Exercise for weight loss: Calories burned in 1 hour

Being active can help you lose weight and keep it off. Find out how much you need.

Being active is vital to losing weight and keeping it off. When active, the body uses more energy in the form of calories. And burning more calories than you take in leads to weight loss.

To lose weight, most people need to cut the number of calories they eat and move more. This is according to the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Most often, that means cutting daily calories by 500 to 750 to lose 1 1/2 pounds (0.7 kilograms) a week.

Other factors might be involved in losing weight. Because of changes to the body over time, you might need to cut calories more as you age to keep losing weight or to stay at the same weight.

Diet or exercise: Does one matter more?

Both are important. Diet affects weight loss more than physical activity does. Physical activity, including exercise, has a stronger effect in keeping weight from coming back after weight loss.

Losing weight with diet alone and without physical activity can make people weaker. This is because of age-related losses in bone density and muscle mass. Adding resistance training and aerobic exercise to a weight-loss program helps prevent the loss of bone and muscle.

These are the exercise guidelines for most healthy adults from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

Aerobic activity. Get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity a week. Or get 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week. You also can get an equal mix of the two types.

Aim to exercise most days of the week. For even more health benefits, strive for 300 minutes a week or more of moderate aerobic activity or 150 minutes of vigorous activity. Exercising this much may help with weight loss or keeping off lost weight. But even small amounts of physical activity can be helpful. Being active for short periods of time during the day can add up and give you great health benefits.

  • Strength training. Do strength training exercises for all major muscle groups at least two times a week. One set of each exercise is enough for health and fitness benefits. Use a weight or resistance level heavy enough to tire your muscles after about 12 to 15 repetitions.

Moderate aerobic exercise includes activities such as brisk walking, biking, swimming and mowing the lawn.

Vigorous aerobic exercise includes activities such as running, swimming hard laps, heavy yardwork and aerobic dancing.

Strength training can include use of weights or weight machines, your own body weight, resistance tubing, or activities such as rock climbing.

How much am I burning?

This list shows about how many calories are burned while doing certain exercises for one hour. This is based on a person who weighs 160 pounds (73 kilograms). The calories you burn depend on the exercise you do, how hard you do it, how much you weigh and other factors.

Based on Ainsworth BE, et al. 2011 compendium of physical activities: A second update of codes and MET values. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2011;43:1575.

Remember, to lose weight or to keep weight from creeping up on you as you age, you need to eat less and move more. Moving more means adding more physical activity into your life.

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  • Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. 2nd ed. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://health.gov/paguidelines/second-edition. Accessed March 13, 2024.
  • Physical activity for a healthy weight. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/physical_activity/index.html. Accessed March 13, 2024.
  • Ainsworth BE, et al. 2011 compendium of physical activities: A second update of codes and MET values. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2011;43:1575.
  • 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. https://www.dietaryguidelines.gov. Accessed March 13, 2024.
  • Perreault L, et al. Obesity in adults: Role of physical activity and exercise. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed March 13, 2024.
  • AskMayoExpert. Physical activity (adult). Mayo Clinic; 2022.

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Digital twins: The art of the possible in product development and beyond

Industrial companies around the world rely on digital tools to turn ideas into physical products for their customers. These tools have become increasingly more powerful, flexible, and sophisticated since the 1960s and 1970s, when computers first began replacing drawing boards in design offices. Today, product life-cycle management (PLM) has become engineers’ first language: PLM systems help companies to capture, codify, process, and communicate product knowledge across their organizations.

About the authors

This article is a collaborative effort by Mickael Brossard , Sebastien Chaigne, Jacomo Corbo, Bernhard Mühlreiter , and Jan Paul Stein, representing views from McKinsey’s Operations Practice.

Yet as engineering tools have become more capable, the demands placed upon them have also increased. Product functions are increasingly delivered through a combination of hardware and software. Sensors and communications capabilities allow products to offer more features and to respond more effectively to changing operating conditions and user requirements. Advanced, adaptable user interfaces have simplified the operation of complex and sophisticated machines.

Evolving business models are also blurring the boundaries between design and use. Customers expect the performance and functionality of products to improve during their life cycle, enabled by over-the-air software updates or the ability to unlock new features as needed. Many products operate as part of an ecosystem of related products and services. Increasingly, customers are not buying products outright, but paying for the capabilities they provide on a per-use or subscription basis.

The birth of the digital twin

These changing requirements have triggered a transformation in digital product representation and the creation of a new tool: the digital twin. Digital twins combine and build upon existing digital engineering tools, incorporating additional data sources, adding advanced simulation and analytics capabilities, and establishing links to live data generated during the product’s manufacture and use. A conventional PLM system uses one digital model to represent each variant of a product. A digital twin, by contrast, may have one model for each individual product, which is continually updated using data collected during the product’s life cycle.

The digital-twin approach can be applied to products, manufacturing processes, or even entire value chains. In this article, we will focus on their application to products, specifically to product design.

Digital twins offer multiple potential benefits for product-based companies and users. They can aid design optimization, reduce costs and time to market, and accelerate the organization’s response to new customer needs. Digital twins can also be a critical enabler of new revenue streams, such as remote maintenance and support offerings and “as a service” business models.

Based on the experience of companies that have already adopted the approach, we estimate that digital-twin technologies can drive a revenue increase of up to 10 percent, accelerate time to market by as much as 50 percent, and improve product quality by up to 25 percent. Digital-twin technology  is becoming a significant industry. Current estimates indicate that the market for digital twins in Europe alone will be around €7 billion by 2025, with an annual growth rate of 30 to 45 percent. 1 Infinium; MarketsandMarkets; MarkNTel Advisors; Meticulous Market Research; Mordor Intelligence; SBIS; Technavio, last accessed April 2020.

Digital twins in practice

Companies in many different industries are already capturing real value by applying digital twins to product development , manufacturing, and through-life support (exhibit).

An automotive OEM, for example, has used the digital-twin approach to create a concept configurator for early phase development . The start of the development process is especially challenging for complex products because the various stakeholder groups, such as sales, engineering, and finance, may have different or even contradictory product requirements. The OEM now balances these trade-offs using a digital concept configurator that allows for simultaneous evaluation of customer requirements, technical concepts, and product costs. When a technical concept within a system or subsystem of the product is changed, the implications for meeting customer requirements or product cost targets become immediately transparent.

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Using the configurator within cross-functional development teams has helped the OEM to reallocate 5 to 15 percent of a new vehicle’s material costs to the attributes that drive the most customer value. Applying the approach to select customer-facing components has allowed the company to optimize costs and customer value simultaneously, improving the contribution margin of those parts by 5 to 10 percent. As a further benefit, the configurator helped the team reduce the time taken to reach agreement on changes by 20 percent, thus accelerating time to market.

Digital twins are even being used to replicate systems in complex mission scenarios. Using this approach, one aerospace and defense player has cut the time required to develop advanced products by 30 to 40 percent. The digital twin also aids discussion with customers during the development process, helping the company validate and improve its designs.

In the consumer electronics sector, a company is using product digital twins to boost quality and supply chain resilience . It stores detailed information on the content of its products, including the exact source of individual components. In the event of quality issues during production or early failures in the field, the company can trace problems back to specific supplier facilities, then take appropriate action to prevent reoccurrence of the issue. An automotive supplier uses the same approach to trace quality deviations in its production through to the upstream supply chain, and in the process has reduced scrap by 20 percent.

Digital twins are increasingly being used to improve future product generations . An electric-vehicle (EV) manufacturer, for example, uses live data from more than 80 sensors to track energy consumption under different driving regimes and in varying weather conditions. Analysis of that data allows it to upgrade its vehicle control software, with some updates introduced into new vehicles and others delivered over the air to existing customers.

Developers of autonomous-driving systems , meanwhile, are increasingly developing their technology in virtual environments. The training and validation of algorithms in a simulated environment is safer and cheaper than real-world tests. Moreover, the ability to run numerous simulations in parallel has accelerated the testing process by more than 10,000 times. Incorporating sensor data from real-world vehicles into these tests helps companies improve the veracity of their simulations and identify blind spots in the virtual test database.

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The mainstreaming of additive manufacturing

A company in the renewable-energy sector is using a digital twin to automate, accelerate, and improve the engineering of hydroelectric turbines . Using the machine learning system to evaluate the likely performance of the new designs allowed it to rate more than a million different designs in seconds rather than the hours required for conventional computational flow dynamics (CFD) analysis. The winning geometry delivers the maximum theoretical performance, significantly higher than what is achievable by conventional optimization methods. Moreover, by using machine learning, the overall end-to-end design cycle time was cut in half compared with the conventional approach.

Digital twins in three dimensions

Digital twins can take many different forms. Organizations that want to take advantage of digital-twin technologies must select an appropriate form that will enhance its technical and business objectives. The design of a digital twin can vary across three dimensions (exhibit).

The first dimension encompasses the value chain steps that the digital twin will cover. An engineering twin covers value chain steps similar to those covered by conventional PLM systems, ranging from product definition to detailed engineering. A production twin replicates a product throughout the manufacturing process, incorporating data such as the components, materials, and process parameters used, as well as the results of tests and quality checks. A service twin incorporates data collected from the product in use, such as operating modes, performance, diagnostic information, and maintenance history. The most sophisticated digital twins span multiple parts of the value chain, allowing in-service data to optimize manufacturing processes or future design iterations.

The second dimension is the scope of the digital twin. A product may consist of several major systems, multiple subsystems, and hundreds or thousands of hardware and software components. Some digital twins cover only one or several components, for example, those that simulate the flow of liquids through a pipe. Others cover a full product, for example, those that simulate a car’s crash characteristics. Given the limitations of computing power, generally, the narrower the scope of a digital twin, the more precise its virtual replica will be. In contrast, full-product digital twins often need to abstract or simplify certain product behaviors to remain manageable.

The final dimension of a digital twin is its degree of sophistication . The simplest digital twins consist of various sources of data relating to a product, often from sources that have few or no links with one another. The second level of sophistication uses traditional simulation tools to perform analyses of design performance and integrate the various sources through a PLM system or similar platform.

At the third level of sophistication, a digital twin will use predictive or prescriptive analytics, as well as machine learning technology to run automated simulation refinements and yield new insights. This allows design and manufacturing teams to make informed decisions based upon direct results and performances.

At the last level of sophistication, digital twins use predictions of component failure rates or performance variations to react to changing environments and manipulate the real-world counterpart in a closed-loop setup. This approach might be used in a condition monitoring system, for example, where sensor data and simulations are combined to make inferences and predictions about the state and behavior of a specific product, and might allow a machine to compensate for wear or variations in operating conditions by adjusting parameters in real time.

Companies in other sectors are also starting to use digital twins to derive deeper insights into customer behaviors and preferences . For example, white-goods manufacturers can use data from in-service products to identify the most and least used features. That can inform future product development decisions, such as deleting rarely used features or revising the user interface to make the features more accessible.

The adoption of digital twins is currently gaining momentum across industries, as companies aim to reap the benefits of various types of digital twins. Given the many different shapes and forms of digital twins (see sidebar, “Digital twins in three dimensions”), and the different starting points of each organization, a clear strategy is needed to help prioritize where to focus digital-twin development and what steps to take to capture the most value.

How to start and succeed on your digital-twin journey

Embarking on a digital-twin journey can look daunting at first sight, especially since the breadth and depth of use cases can span the entire corporate landscape, including product portfolio choices, business model design, R&D, manufacturing, and through-life support.

This versatility can also be a strength, however, as it allows companies to start small and expand the scope, sophistication, and value-chain coverage of their digital-twin projects over time. The experience of companies that have applied digital twins in their own product operations leads to a few simple rules that can greatly increase your odds of success.

Define your aspirations

Be aware of digital-twin best practices. Do your homework and seek out perspectives on best practices and future trends in digital-twin technology. Assess and prioritize the elements of your vision. Evaluate the potential of digital-twin-related opportunities and prioritize them into an implementation road map.

Be clear about the business case. Quantify the value offered by different digital-twin opportunities and determine the minimum level of model sophistication required to generate that value. Successful projects focus on short development times and rapid ROI.

Test the waters by prototyping select use cases. Run a series of hackathons (possibly supported by digital-twin specialists) to assess your capabilities’ baseline, develop solution prototypes, refine, and adjust the initial concepts. This step calibrates the approach and prevents you from losing time and resources by attempting an impossible plan. It is part of a broader value assurance move aimed at bringing the entire project to a successful conclusion.

Know your strengths

Perform a maturity assessment. Understand your current digital product development capabilities along six main dimensions: development methodologies, PLM governance, data strategy, business processes, system complexity, and collaboration. Understanding the areas where you are most advanced and where you are lagging behind will help prioritize areas of investment for a balanced implementation of a digital twin and its use cases.

Access to appropriate talent and capabilities can make or break a digital-twin initiative. Many organizations need to develop additional expertise in areas such as advanced simulation and modeling or data analytics for user experience design.

Plan a step-by-step, agile implementation

Invest several months in developing a minimum viable product (MVP). Incubate a cross-functional, agile team dedicated to bringing priority use cases to life and building digital capabilities in the process. The MVP is now the must-do approach to maximize value gains from the start rather than waiting until the program is finalized before experiencing the first benefits.

Perform an MVP retrospective to pivot or persevere. Derive lessons from the first MVP phase to confirm your digital-twin aspirations or pivot them based on the findings (for example, the validity of use cases, complexity of implementation, and maturity of the organization). This is the second value assurance move that enables you to further calibrate the implementation plan and revise the scope to avoid generating sunk costs.

Scale up the digital-twin initiative and accelerate ROI. Optimize and standardize implementation based on insights from the MVP phase. Define an (internal or external) recruiting and capability-building strategy. Build an operating model to enable rapid scaling of successful approaches. The most advanced organizations typically consider digital-twin technologies a core strategic capability.

By following these simple best practices, you will be able to reap the benefits of digital twins in a scalable, progressive way. Are you ready?

Mickael Brossard is a partner in McKinsey’s Paris office, where Sebastien Chaigne is an associate partner; Jacomo Corbo is a partner in the London office; Bernhard Mühlreiter is a partner in the Vienna office; and Jan Paul Stein is an associate partner in the Munich office.

The authors wish to thank Roberto Argolini, Elia Berteletti, Kimberly Borden, Akshay Desai, Hannes Erntell, Alessandro Faure Ragani, Anna Herlt, Mark Huntington, Mithun Kamat, Michele Manzo, and Alessandro Mattozzi for their contributions to this article.

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Roger Corman, the B-movie legend who launched A-list careers, dies at 98

Cult film director Roger Corman often came up with titles before he came up with plots. His 1957 movie Attack of the Crab Monsters is one example — "I had no story," Corman told NPR's Renee Montagne in 2010.

Over the course of his half-century long career, Roger Corman filled America's drive-ins with hundreds of low-budget movies. They had titles like Sharktopus, Teenage Doll and The Terror. The trailers — and titles — were often better than the movies themselves.

But Corman was also a major figure in American independent film. The directors and actors who worked with him at the beginnings of their careers are a veritable who's who: Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme, Francis Ford Coppola.

"I think the task of the filmmaker is to break through and hit that horror that still remains in the unconscious mind," Corman said. "And there's a certain amount of catharsis there. He's pictured above in 2009.

Corman died Thursday at his home in Santa Monica, California, according to a statement released Saturday by his wife and daughters. "He was generous, open-hearted and kind to all those who knew him," the statement said. "When asked how he would like to be remembered, he said, 'I was a filmmaker, just that.'" He was 98.

Corman was educated at Stanford and Oxford Universities before he became the dean of grindhouse. Back in 1990, Corman told NPR about making his first film, Monster from the Ocean Floor. It was the early 1950s, and Corman had read in the newspaper about a company that had invented a miniature submarine.

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"I finished breakfast, called them up, said I was an independent filmmaker and would be interested in having their submarine in my picture," he recalled.

Putting free stuff in the flicks he pumped out for cheap became Corman's trademark — along with little-known starlets in even littler outfits, filmed on the littlest of budgets. Corman's thrift was legendary.

Dick Miller acted in dozens of Corman films, including the 1955 Western Apache Woman. "I played an Indian in my first picture and about halfway through [Corman] asked me ... Would you like to play a cowboy?" Miller remembered in a Fresh Air interview in 2004. "I said, Doing another movie already? He says, No, in the same movie. So I ended up playing a cowboy and an Indian in my first movie."

Corman released as many as eight pictures a year — a breakneck pace that rivaled even major studios. Once, as a joke, he borrowed a set (for free, of course) and shot a movie in two days and one night. That hastily assembled movie was the original, black and white, Little Shop of Horrors.

"Possibly the fast pace, the insane schedule, brought something to the picture that made it the more-or-less cult film it became," Corman said.

Some of Hollywood's biggest stars got their starts working on Corman films. Above, Salli Sachse and Peter Fonda are pictured on the set of The Trip, a 1966 film written by Jack Nicholson and directed by Corman.

Of course, it didn't hurt that the film featured a young Jack Nicholson playing a masochistic dental patient.

Nicholson showed up in a raft of Corman pictures, including a relatively well-regarded series based on works by Edgar Allan Poe, all starring Vincent Price.

But Corman was mostly synonymous with schlock — there was The Student Nurses in 1970 (followed by several subsequent nurse-focused films), the 1966 biker gang movie The Wild Angels , and 1975's homicidal hot rod movie Death Race 2000.

"The drivers are scored not only on how fast they can drive, and how many other drivers they could hit, but also how many pedestrians they could kill," Corman bragged. "Now that was the key. The picture was the biggest success we had, ever, and it led to all kinds of jokes that entered our era."

Corman received an honorary Oscar in 2009 for producing and directing more than 300 films and fostering the careers of Ron Howard, John Sayles, Sylvester Stallone and James Cameron.

"Probably all of his movies combined would not have cost as much as Avatar, " Cameron told NPR in 2010.

Corman produced Cameron's first full-length feature, 1981's Piranha II: The Spawning, and taught him an essential lesson: "Your will is the only thing that makes the difference in getting the job done ..." Cameron said. "It teaches you to improvise, and, in a funny way, to never lose hope. Because you're making a movie, and the movie can be what you want it to be."

The movies Corman willed into being are their own loopy, glorious world of teenage cavemen, X-ray eyes and humanoids from the deep. His 300-some movies barely even rose to the level of camp. But many of Hollywood's most respected directors have at least one Corman credit buried in their resumes. And by teaching so many people how to deliver on-budget and on-schedule, Corman was arguably one of the most influential figures of American film.

In 1964 he married Julie Halloran, a UCLA graduate who also became a producer. He is survived by his wife Julie and children Catherine, Roger, Brian and Mary.

Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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