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135+ List of Adjective Words To Add To Your Writing

Here is a list of adjective words that you can add to your writing projects.

Adjectives play a vital role in forming clear and vivid sentences. They are critical to describing things, events, people, and feelings. Not only are adjectives essential in writing, but they are also a key part of language, and we use them daily to describe our feelings, events, and surroundings. It pairs nicely with our list of mood words for literature .

What Are Adjective Words?

Opinion adjectives, size adjectives, physical quality adjectives, shape adjectives, age adjectives, color adjectives, origin adjectives, material adjectives, purpose adjectives.

List of adjective words

An adjective is a term or phrase that describes and modifies the qualities, state, and quantity of nouns and pronouns. There is a specific rule when there’s more than one adjective in a sentence that cannot be broken even in informal speech or writing, unlike grammar and syntax. It’s called the “order of adjectives,” where the use of adjectives is ranked accordingly: opinion, size, physical quality, shape, age, color, origin, material, and purpose.

List of adjective words

Opinion adjectives express thoughts and feelings about a topic, person, or thing. It also describes and modifies a person’s facial expression, body parts, actions, and traits. 

Linda has an amazing voice.

The new cafe’s interior design is beautiful .

She had a very cool demeanor. 

  • Flirtatious

Many believe that Helena isn’t a flirtatious woman.

Leonardo De Caprio is one of the most handsome Hollywood actors.

My dad has the irritating habit of talking during meals.

My husband is irrationally jealous of my ex-boyfriend.

Our new professor has a lovely personality.

He’s a nice guy when he’s in a good mood.

You should apologize to your mom for your rude behavior.

She’ll use all her seductive charms to get John’s attention.

I want my steak to be delicious, juicy, and tender .

The drink has a very unusual taste.

Old people and kids are the most vulnerable members of our society.

Ed likes to say a lot of weird things.

These words denote the amount of space available or occupied by a person or an object. It also describes how small or large someone or something is.

Liam wants a big house, but his wife says no.

I want a brainy and brawny boyfriend.

They have a compact kitchen with all the necessary tools and appliances.

Every year, Brazil produces an enormous amount of coffee in the world.

The pack must hunt down a giant bear before the winter season begins.

The story she’s been writing contains a hefty amount of comedy.

  • Immeasurable

I hope more filmmakers create movies with immeasurable effects on the younger generation.

She wants to buy a life-size standee of her favorite idol.

  • Microscopic

The doctor has microscopic handwriting that’s hard to read.

Many people like to wear an oversize t-shirt because it’s trendy and comfortable.

Do you know where I can buy quality dresses that fit my petite body?

Cecile’s short hair makes her look younger.

Our company will build a tall building in the area.

Every guest has unlimited access to the pool and gym.

A dictionary is a vast treasure box of information.

These describe the physical characteristics of a person, animal, place, happening, or thing. 

He likes to surround himself with attractive people.

My father is still young, but he’s already starting to go bald .

A curvy figure is the new sexy.

Lina is small and delicate.  

Our neighbor is preparing an elegant party for her daughter’s birthday.

He’s fit because he’s a gym enthusiast.

My frail grandfather still refuses to even sit up on his bed.

The hotel room had a musky odor filling the air.

His plump lips are what make him so handsome.

The new table in our kitchen has a rough finish.

Please avoid making sharp turns because it’s dangerous.

His long, straight hair makes people mistake him for a girl.

My brother is that tattooed guy riding the big bike. 

My professor told me to work on my untidy writing.

His well-built body is the fruit of his hard work.

These words describe things without referring to the color and type of material used. Use the terms below to describe and compare different objects based on their shape and structure.

Gio inherits his father’s angular face.

Most bodybuilders have a broad torso and narrow waist.

Grandpa said that his crooked front teeth are his lucky charm.

Big cruise ships need to be in deep waters to sail.

A diagonal line divides the layout of The Da Vinci Code book cover.

Professional contractors in Switzerland make globular houses and buildings.  

Our engineer tests the strength of a hollow block by the drop test method.

The wall painting is at an oblique angle.

My mother’s ring has a unique oval ruby ​​gem.

The kingdom’s soldiers have pointy helmets.

  • Rectangular

His rectangular smile is contagious.

People with round faces should opt for a layered haircut.

His uncle has a square jaw.

She’s wearing her favorite tapered jeans.

Today, they will perform on the triangular stage in the park.

These words are commonly used in verbal communication and writings to describe or indicate the age of animate and inanimate objects. 

There are no plans to resolve the age-old issue of land distribution.

The aging founder of our company is planning to resign.

My dream is to visit every ancient home and building around the world.

There’s a lot of antique furniture in my grandmother’s house. 

The declining demand for traditional kimonos will ultimately affect Japan’s culture. 

The group that I will tour today has a lot of elderly people.

Her mature boyfriend always helps her make rational decisions.

Peer pressure often leads to bad decisions among young people.

An old man’s advice is the best you can get.

The neighbor’s senescent dog has been with them for 13 years. 

The organization’s senile leader needs will soon step down.

Hailey is promoted to the senior psychologist position at the clinic.

Her teenage daughter loves to party. 

The modeling company is looking for young models to train.

My mom still has her youthful spirit.

Color adjectives describe the shade of nouns and can also express emotions or feelings.

She wants to change her hair color to ashy gray.

Jay looks good in blue clothes.

The designer uses bright colors and chintzy fabrics to make the room livelier.

Her smallpox left her with dotted skin.

He’s a famous celebrity known for his flamboyant lifestyle.

The athlete’s glistening back shines under the sun.

Half of the clothes in her closet are monotone black.

The newborn child has beautiful muddy eyes.

Add sparkle to your fabrics by making opalescent dyes by hand.

She has a natural pink undertone.

The compliment highlights her red cheeks.

The tourist is amazed by the rustic charm of the village.

The little girl’s skirt has lots of splashy flower prints.

  • Translucent

The bathrooms are made of frosted and translucent glass.

She likes to add vibrant colors to her room.

These words indicate where a person, animal, or thing comes from. See the most commonly used origin adjectives by many speakers and writers.

I ate the American breakfast offered by the hotel.

Most of the British police don’t carry a gun .

A Caucasian model visits our store to shop for clothes.

New York City was a trading post founded by a Dutch colonist.

Spice up your usual potato salad with English mustard.

My favorite singer will have his European concert tour next year!

I love cheesy French fries with soda.

He has a strong Greek accent.

Italian pizza is the best!

Japanese people have the highest life expectancy . 

Korean culture is prevalent all over the world because of K-Pop.

The majority of English words we know have Greek and Latin origins.

Ysa loves Mexican food, especially enchiladas.

Can you tell me where I can buy Thai rice?

Dad likes the strong, bold, and bittersweet taste of Turkish coffee.

Material is a substance from which an object is made. In most cases, these adjectives are usually nouns that act as adjectives to describe another noun. 

My uncle collects copper coins.

Sheila’s new husband owns a cotton plantation.

She dreams of having a diamond ring.

Angel’s mom is fond of gold utensils.

Her expensive vice includes shopping for leather bags.

Their house has a metal gate painted like wood.

She needs a replacement for her guitar’s nylon strings.

We should avoid using plastic bags to save Mother Earth.

Polyester clothing is affordable but durable. 

Her silk hair floats with the wind.

Wait for a silver car that will take you to your destination.

Ian dreams of living in a stone house.

She likes how velvet skirts feel against her skin.

I prefer using wooden kitchen utensils. 

My favorite part of the house is the wool carpet in our living area.

Purpose adjectives are words that are almost part of the noun. They describe what an item is for. 

Put your dirty garments in the laundry basket .

Can you look in the cleaning supplies aisle and get some borax?

Mon uses his new cooking pan to make pancakes.

Do you want to take dancing lessons?

My dad stores his fishing rods in the shed.

I use my grandmother’s gardening tools for my planting project.

The hammered copper bowl is the center of attention for today’s auction.  

I use a polishing cloth to clean my glasses.

Mom holds the rolling pin like she wants to hit me.

I lost my running shoes at the local gym.

Come with me to the shopping center and buy a gift for Sophia.

Jake always makes sure that his sleeping bag is in his car.

Miko is looking for a new tennis racket for his brother.

I broke our washing machine.

I use a writing app to assist me in my essays. Looking for more descriptive words to elevate your writing? Check out list of descriptive words !

adjectives in creative writing

Maria Caballero is a freelance writer who has been writing since high school. She believes that to be a writer doesn't only refer to excellent syntax and semantics but also knowing how to weave words together to communicate to any reader effectively.

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Strong Adjectives to Show Creative Writing

Table of Contents

With strong adjectives come strong thoughts. Anyone can use strong adjectives to convey a potent idea or paint a vivid picture through their words. There’s always a better way to state a fact.

Our manner of speech can influence the way people perceive us and our ideas. You need only look at how leaders, lawyers, and other influential people write and speak. Their word choices and tone can hold sway over listeners and deliver a powerful message.

In this article, we’ll be learning some strong  adjectives for a writer .

person writing on brown wooden table near white ceramic mug

But before we delve into these words, it’s important to understand strong adjectives and the right way to use them.

What are Strong Adjectives?

Strong adjectives describe the important characteristics, feelings, or qualities of writing . These adjectives are often things that readers cannot ignore. 

Writers use strong adjectives instead of very + a normal adjective.

For example:

Very short → Succinct, Terse

Very long → Lengthy, Extensive 

They often paint a strong example of a noun they are describing. They can help make a sentence more potent or describe a character in greater detail. Writers use strong adjectives in all sorts of creative works, from books to poems.

These adjectives often cause readers to take note of an object they read about.

The Importance of Strong Adjectives

Strong adjectives are important because not all descriptive words can sufficiently capture the full meaning of a subject. Strong adjectives give a different sense of reality and highlight one part of an object or idea. It does this to demonstrate the characteristics that make certain nouns unique.

Strong adjectives also help an audience relate better to a thought. They help them grasp their essence entirely, allowing us to accurately describe what we feel and want to convey.

Moreover, strong adjectives also give the impression that we are an authority on the subject we are describing. Rarely will you find a critic use “very bad” to describe a poorly-written piece of writing.

You need to learn to use strong adjectives to write powerful sentences that leave a strong impression. The list below includes strong adjectives for a writer: 

List of Strong Adjectives for a Writer

  • Authoritative
  • Enthralling
  • Exhilarating
  • Imaginative
  • Intelligent

The English language is replete with a wide collection of words you can use to convey a thought. Descriptors are among the most potent words writers can use to paint a vivid picture for their audience. Strong adjectives are useful in order to command influence over your audience and deliver a powerful message.

Try to learn new and better words to spice up your vocabulary. Doing so will improve your writing and speaking skills and will allow you to command attention like the way influential people do. Feel free to follow our other guides on strong adjectives if you want to gain better mastery of the English language.

Strong Adjectives to Show Creative Writing

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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Awesome Adjectives List

List of adjectives for kids creative writing- easy and advanced lists

Adjectives are words that describe nouns. When you write with interesting adjectives, you help your reader know more about how your characters and your setting look, feel, smell, taste, and sound. Better adjectives create a story with more vivid and precise detail. For example, your character could have blue eyes. Or, your character could have narrowed, ice-blue eyes that glint like sharpened diamonds. Your character just got a lot more interesting with some stronger adjectives. Explore the lists of awesome adjectives for kids that will help you bring your story to life. See our story samples for more awesome adjectives in action.

Choose an Awesome Adjectives List:

  • Easy Adjectives List - 2nd grade, 3rd grade, 4th grade adjectives
  • Advanced Adjectives List - 5th grade, 6th grade, middle school adjectives

Activities:

Also try our adjective-based activities.

Awesome Adjectives List- For Kids Grades 2, 3, 4

Download the adjectives list for kids in 2nd, 3rd, 4th grade: PDF Download-- Awesome Adjectives List (2nd, 3rd, 4th grade)

Busy Lazy Careless Clumsy Nimble Brave Mighty Meek Clever Dull Afraid Scared Cowardly Bashful Proud Fair Greedy Wise Foolish Tricky Truthful Loyal Happy Cheerful Joyful Carefree Friendly Moody Crabby Cranky Awful Gloomy Angry Worried Excited Calm Bored Hardworking Silly Wild Crazy Fussy Still Odd Starving Stuffed Alert Sleepy Surprised Tense

Rude Selfish Strict Tough Polite Amusing Kind Gentle Quiet Caring Hopeful Rich Thrifty Stingy Spoiled Generous Quick Speedy Swift Hasty Rapid Good Fantastic Splendid Wonderful Hard Difficult Challenging Easy Simple Chilly Freezing Icy Steaming Sizzling Muggy Cozy Huge Great Vast Sturdy Grand Heavy Plump Deep Puny Small Tiny Petite Long Endless

Beautiful Adorable Shining Sparkling Glowing Fluttering Soaring Crawling Creeping Sloppy Messy Slimy Grimy Crispy Spiky Rusty Smelly Foul Stinky Curly Fuzzy Plush Lumpy Wrinkly Smooth Glassy Snug Stiff Ugly Hideous Horrid Dreadful Nasty Cruel Creepy Loud Shrill Muffled Creaky

Awesome Adjectives List- Grades 5, 6, Middle School

Download the list for kids in 5th grade, 6th grade and middle school: PDF Download-- Awesome Adjectives List (5th, 6th, Middle School)

Graceful Clumsy Awkward Nimble Clever Dull Obtuse Meek Anemic Frightened Timid Vigilant Cautious Capable Adequate Absent-minded Adventurous Daring Indifferent Apologetic Hideous Horrid Dreadful Ghastly Revolting Nasty Cruel Cheeky Obnoxious Disrespectful Contrary Ornery Subtle Optimistic Courageous Cowardly Gullible Arrogant Haughty Naïve Curious Stubborn Brazen Modest Humble Proud Dishonest Righteous Greedy Wise Tricky Loyal Relaxed Tranquil Lazy Rambunctious Erratic Fidgety Lively Still Famished Surprised Startled Sullen Terrified Furious Annoyed

Sullen Groggy Alert Tense Cranky Gloomy Irritable Lonely Exhausted Ecstatic Cheerful Delighted Blithe Content Carefree Demanding Challenging Effortless Simple

Fantastic Marvelous Splendid Brilliant Superb Striking Stunning Gorgeous Picturesque Lovely Charming Enchanting Delicate Pleasant Monstrous Immense Enormous Massive Brawny Bulky Towering Rotund Cavernous Puny Minute Diminutive Microscopic Petite Slight Bitter Frosty Sweltering Scorching Blistering Muggy Stifling Oppressive Cozy Eternal Ceaseless Perpetual Endless Temporary Intimidating Menacing Miserable Dangerous Delinquent Vile Quarrelsome Hostile Malicious Savage Stern Somber Mysterious Shocking Infamous Ingenious Thrifty Generous Prudent Stingy Spoiled

Anxious Nervous Impatient Worried Excited Courteous Compassionate Benevolent Polite Amusing Entertaining Creative Precise Eccentric Decrepit Ancient Rotten Whimsical Dense Desolate Disgusting Dismal Opulent Idyllic Lavish Edgy Trendy Peculiar Rancid Fetid Foul Filthy Repulsive Lousy Fluttering Soaring Sparkling Gilded Verdant Glowing Askew Dowdy Gaunt Sloppy Serious Grave Intense Severe Heavy Solemn Absurd Ridiculous Sluggish Dawdling Meandering Scarce Copious Muffled Lulling Creaky Shrill Piercing Slimy Grimy Gauzy Mangy Swollen Parched Crispy Spiky Slick Fuzzy Lumpy Plush Wrinkly Slick Glassy Snug Stiff

Writing Resources

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  • Vibrant Verbs List
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Last updated on Aug 18, 2023

60 Literary Devices and Techniques Every Writer Must Know

A literary device is a writing technique that writers use to express ideas, convey meaning, and highlight important themes in a piece of text. A metaphor, for instance, is a famous example of a literary device.

These devices serve a wide range of purposes in literature. Some might work on an intellectual level, while others have a more emotional effect. They may also work subtly to improve the flow and pacing of your writing. No matter what, if you're looking to inject something special into your prose, literary devices are a great place to start.

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Sentence-level devices

1. alliteration.

Alliteration describes a series of words in quick succession that all start with the same letter or sound. It lends a pleasing cadence to prose and Hamlet and the dollar as currency in Macbeth .

Example: “ One short sleepe past, wee wake eternally,

And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.” — “Death, Be Not Proud” by John Donne

Exercise: Pick a letter and write a sentence where every word starts with that letter or one that sounds similar. 

2. Anaphora

Anaphora is the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of a series of clauses or sentences. It’s often seen in poetry and speeches, intended to provoke an emotional response in its audience.

Example: Martin Luther King’s 1963 “I Have A Dream” speech.

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed.

"… and I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit together at the table of brotherhood.

"… I have a dream that little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

Exercise: Pick a famous phrase and write a paragraph elaborating on an idea, beginning each sentence with that phrase. 

Similar term: repetition

3. Anastrophe

Anastrophe is a figure of speech wherein the traditional sentence structure is reversed. So a typical verb-subject-adjective sentence such as “Are you ready?” becomes a Yoda-esque adjective-verb-subject question: “Ready, are you?” Or a standard adjective-noun pairing like “tall mountain” becomes “mountain tall.”

Example: “Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing.” — “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

Exercise: Write a standard verb-subject-adjective sentence or adjective-noun pairing then flip the order to create an anastrophe. How does it change the meaning or feeling of the sentence?

4. Chiasmus

Chiasmus is when two or more parallel clauses are inverted. “Why would I do that?” you may be wondering. Well, a chiasmus might sound confusing and unnecessary in theory, but it's much more convincing in practice — and in fact, you've likely already come across it before.

Example: “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” — John F. Kennedy

5. Congeries

Congeries is a fancy literary term for creating a list. The items in your list can be words, ideas, or phrases, and by displaying them this way helps prove or emphasize a point — or even create a sense of irony. Occasionally, it’s also called piling as the words are “piling up.”

Example: "Apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order, what have the Romans done for us?" — Monty Python’s Life of Brian

6. Cumulative sentence

A cumulative sentence (or “loose sentence”) is one that starts with an independent clause, but then has additional or modifying clauses. They’re often used for contextual or clarifying details. This may sound complex, but even, “I ran to the store to buy milk, bread, and toilet paper” is a cumulative sentence, because the first clause, “I ran to the store,” is a complete sentence, while the rest tells us extra information about your run to the store.

Example: “It was a large bottle of gin Albert Cousins had brought to the party, yes, but it was in no way large enough to fill all the cups, and in certain cases to fill them many times over, for the more than one hundred guests, some of whom were dancing not four feet in front of him.” – Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

Example: Write three sentences that are related to each other. Can you combine the information into a cumulative sentence? 

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Literary Devices Cheatsheet

Master these 40+ devices to level up your writing skills.

7. Epistrophe

Epistrophe is the opposite of anaphora, with this time a word or phrase being repeated at the end of a sentence. Though its placement in a sentence is different it serves the same purpose—creating emphasis—as an anaphora does. 

Example: “I’ll be ever’where – wherever you look. Wherever they’s a fight so hungry people can eat, I’ll be there. Wherever they’s a cop beatin’ up a guy, I’ll be there . If Casy knowed, why, I’ll be in the way guys yell when they’re mad an’ – I’ll be in the way kids laugh when they’re hungry an’ they know supper’s ready. An’ when our folks eat the stuff they raise an’ live in the houses they build, why, I’ll be there .” — The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Similar terms: repetition, anaphora

Exercise: Write a paragraph where a phrase or a word is repeated at the end of every sentence, emphasizing the point you’re trying to make. 

8. Erotesis

Erotesis is a close cousin of the rhetorical question. Rather than a question asked without expectation of an answer, this is when the question (and the asker) confidently expects a response that is either negative or affirmative. 

Example: “ Do you then really think that you have committed your follies in order to spare your son them?” — Siddhartha by Herman Hesse

Similar term: rhetorical question

9. Hyperbaton

Hyperbaton is the inversion of words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence that differs from how they would normally be arranged. It comes from the Greek hyperbatos, which means “transposed” or “inverted.” While it is similar to anastrophe, it doesn’t have the same specific structure and allows you to rearrange your sentences in whatever order you want. 

Example: “Object there was none. Passion there was none. I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire.” — “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe

Similar terms: anastrophe, epistrophe

10. Isocolon

If you’re a neat freak who likes things just so , isocolon is the literary device for you. This is when two or more phrases or clauses have similar structure, rhythm, and even length — such that, when stacked up on top of each other, they would line up perfectly. Isocolon often crops up in brand slogans and famous sayings; the quick, balanced rhythm makes the phrase catchier and more memorable.

Example: Veni, vidi, vici (“I came, I saw, I conquered”)

11. Litotes

Litotes (pronounced lie-toe-teez ) is the signature literary device of the double negative. Writers use litotes to express certain sentiments through their opposites, by saying that that opposite is not the case. Don’t worry, it makes more sense with the examples. 😉

Examples: “You won’t be sorry” (meaning you’ll be happy); “you’re not wrong” (meaning you’re right); “I didn’t not like it” (meaning I did)

12. Malapropism

If Shakespeare is the king of metaphors, Michael Scott is the king of malapropisms . A malapropism is when similar-sounding words replace their appropriate counterparts, typically to comic effect — one of the most commonly cited is “dance a flamingo,” rather than a “flamenco.” Malapropisms are often employed in dialogue when a character flubs up their speech.

Example: “I am not to be truffled with.”

Exercise: Choose a famous or common phrase and see if you can replace a word with a similar sounding one that changes the meaning. 

literary devices

13. Onomatopoeia

Amusingly, onomatopoeia (itself a difficult-to-pronounce word) refers to words that sound like the thing they’re referring to. Well-known instances of onomatopoeia include whiz, buzz, snap, grunt, etc.

Example: The excellent children's book Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type . “Farmer Brown has a problem. His cows like to type. All day long he hears: Click, clack, moo. Click, clack, moo. Clickety, clack, moo. ”

Exercise: Take some time to listen to the sounds around you and write down what you hear. Now try to use those sounds in a short paragraph or story. 

14. Oxymoron 

An oxymoron comes from two contradictory words that describe one thing. While juxtaposition contrasts two story elements, oxymorons are about the actual words you are using.

Example: "Parting is such sweet sorrow.” — Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. (Find 100 more examples of oxymorons here .)

Similar terms: juxtaposition, paradox

Exercise: Choose two words with opposite meanings and see if you can use them in a sentence to create a coherent oxymoron. 

adjectives in creative writing

15. Parallelism

Parallelism is all about your sentence structure. It’s when similar ideas, sounds, phrases, or words are arranged in a way that is harmonious or creates a parallel, hence the name. It can add rhythm and meter to any piece of writing and can often be found in poetry. 

Example: “ That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” — Neil Armstrong

Which famous author do you write like?

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16. Polysyndeton

Instead of using a single conjunction in lengthy statements, polysyndeton uses several in succession for a dramatic effect. This one is definitely for authors looking to add a bit of artistic flair to their writing, or who are hoping to portray a particular (usually naïve) sort of voice.

Example: “Luster came away from the flower tree and we went along the fence and they stopped and we stopped and I looked through the fence while Luster was hunting in the grass.” — The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

Exercise: Write three or four independent sentences. Try combining them using conjunctions. What kind of effect does this have on the overall meaning and tone of the piece?

17. Portmanteau

A portmanteau is when two words are combined to form a new word which refers to a single concept that retains the meanings of both the original words. Modern language is full of portmanteaus. In fact, the portmanteau is itself a portmanteau. It’s a combination of the French porter (to carry) and manteau (cloak). 

Example: Brunch (breakfast and lunch); cosplay (costume and roleplay); listicle (list and article); romcom (romance and comedy)

Exercise: Pick two words that are often used together to describe a single concept. See if there’s a way to combine them and create a single word that encompasses the meaning of both.

18. Repetition

Repetition , repetition, repetition… where would we be without it? Though too much repetition is rarely a good thing, occasional repetition can be used quite effectively to drill home a point, or to create a certain atmosphere. For example, horror writers often use repetition to make the reader feel trapped and scared.

Example: In The Shining , Jack Torrance types over and over again on his pages,  “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” In this case, obsessive repetition demonstrates the character’s unraveling mind.

Similar term: anaphora

Exercise: Repetition can be used to call attention to an idea or phrase. Pick an idea you want to emphasize and write a few sentences about it. Are there any places where you can add repetition to make it more impactful? 

literary devices

19. Tautology

A tautology is when a sentence or short paragraph repeats a word or phrase, expressing the same idea twice. Often, this is a sign that you should trim your work to remove the redundancy (such as “frozen ice”) but can also be used for poetic emphasis.

Example: "But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door" – “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

20. Tmesis 

Tmesis is when a word or phrase is broken up by an interjecting word, such as abso-freaking-lutely. It’s used to draw out and emphasize the idea, often with a humorous or sarcastic slant.

Example: "This is not Romeo, he's some-other-where." – Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Narrative devices

21. allegory.

An allegory is a type of narrative that uses characters and plot to depict abstract ideas and themes . In an allegorical story, things represent more than they appear to on the surface. Many children's fables, such as The Tortoise and the Hare , are simple allegories about morality — but allegories can also be dark, complex, and controversial. 

Example: Animal Farm by George Orwell. This dystopian novella is one of modern literature’s best-known allegories. A commentary on the events leading up to Stalin's rise and the formation of the Soviet Union, the pigs at the heart of the novel represent figures such as Stalin, Trotsky, and Molotov.

Exercise: Pick a major trend or problem in the world and consider what defines it. Try and create a story where that trend plays out on a smaller scale. 

22. Anecdote

An anecdote is like a short story within a story. Sometimes, they are incredibly short—only a line or two—and their purpose is to add a character’s perspective, knowledge, or experience to a situation. They can be inspirational, humorous, or be used to inspire actions in others. Since anecdotes are so short, don’t expect them to be part of a main story. They’re usually told by a character and part of the dialogue. 

Example: Marcel Proust’s Swann’s Way , part of his series of novels, In Search of Lost Time, deals with the themes of remembrance and memory. In one section of this book, to illustrate these ideas, the main character recalls an important memory of eating a madeleine cookie. “Many years had elapsed during which nothing of Combray, save what was comprised in the theatre and the drama of my going to bed there, had any existence for me, when one day in winter, as I came home, my mother, seeing that I was cold, offered me some tea, a thing I did not ordinarily take. I declined at first, and then, for no particular reason, changed my mind. She sent out for one of those short, plump little cakes called ‘petites madeleines,’ which look as though they had been moulded in the fluted scallop of a pilgrim’s shell.”

23. Deus Ex Machina

Literally meaning “god in the machine” in Greek, deus ex machina is a plot device where an impossible situation is solved by the appearance of an unexpected or unheard of character, action, object, or event. This brings about a quick and usually happy resolution for a story and can be used to surprise an audience, provide comic relief, or provide a fix for a complicated plot. However, deus ex machinas aren’t always looked upon favorably and can sometimes be seen as lazy writing, so they should be used sparingly and with great thought. 

Example: William Golding’s famous novel of a group of British boys marooned on a desert island is resolved with a deus ex machina. At the climax of The Lord of the Flies, just as Ralph is about to be killed by Jack, a naval officer arrives to rescue the boys and bring them back to civilization. It’s an altogether unexpected and bloodless ending for a story about the boys’ descent into savagery. 

Exercise: Consider the ending of your favorite book or movie and then write an alternate ending that uses a deus ex machina to resolve the main conflict. How does this affect the overall story in terms of theme and tone?

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24. Dramatic irony

Dramatic irony is when the readers know more about the situation going on than at least one of the characters involved. This creates a difference between the ways the audience and the characters perceive unfolding events. For instance, if we know that one character is having an affair, when that character speaks to their spouse, we will pick up on the lies and double-meanings of their words, while the spouse may take them at face value.

Example: In Titanic , the audience knows from the beginning of the movie that the boat will sink. This creates wry humor when characters remark on the safety of the ship.

25. Exposition

Exposition is when the narrative provides background information in order to help the reader understand what’s going on. When used in conjunction with description and dialogue, this literary device provides a richer understanding of the characters, setting, and events. Be careful, though — too much exposition will quickly become boring, thus undercutting the emotional impact of your work.

Example: “The Dursley’s had everything they wanted, but they also had a secret, and their greatest fear was that somebody would discover it.” – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Exercise: Pick your favorite story and write a short paragraph introducing it to someone who knows nothing about it. 

26. Flashback

Flashbacks to previous events split up present-day scenes in a story, usually to build suspense toward a big reveal. Flashbacks are also an interesting way to present exposition for your story, gradually revealing to the reader what happened in the past.

Example: Every other chapter in the first part of Gone Girl is a flashback, with Amy’s old diary entries describing her relationship with her husband before she disappeared.

Similar term: foreshadowing

27. Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing is when the author hints at events yet to come in a story. Similar to flashbacks (and often used in conjunction with them), this technique is also used to create tension or suspense — giving readers just enough breadcrumbs to keep them hungry for more.

Example: One popular method of foreshadowing is through partial reveals — the narrator leaves out key facts to prompt readers’ curiosity. Jeffrey Eugenides does this in The Virgin Suicides : “On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide — it was Mary this time, and sleeping pills, like Therese, the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to tie a rope.”

Similar term: flashback

Exercise: Go back to your favorite book or movie. Can you identify any instances of foreshadowing in the early portions of the story for events that happen in the future? 

28. Frame story

A frame story is any part of the story that "frames" another part of it, such as one character telling another about their past, or someone uncovering a diary or a series of news articles that then tell the readers what happened. Since the frame story supports the rest of the plot, it is mainly used at the beginning and the end of the narrative, or in small interludes between chapters or short stories.

Example: In The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, Kvothe is telling Chronicler the story of his life over the span of three days. Most of the novel is the story he is telling, while the frame is any part that takes place in the inn.

29. In Medias Res

In medias res is a Latin term that means "in the midst of things" and is a way of starting a narrative without exposition or contextual information. It launches straight into a scene or action that is already unfolding. 

Example: “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.” — The opening line of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

Exercise: Pick a story you enjoy and rewrite the opening scene so that it starts in the middle of the story. 

30. Point of view

Point of view is, of course, the mode of narration in a story. There are many POVs an author can choose, and each one will have a different impact on the reading experience.

Example: Second person POV is uncommon because it directly addresses the reader — not an easy narrative style to pull off. One popular novel that manages to employ this perspective successfully is Bright Lights, Big City by Jay McInerney: “You are not the kind of guy who would be at a place like this at this time of the morning. But here you are, and you cannot say that the terrain is entirely unfamiliar, although the details are fuzzy.”

Exercise: Write a short passage in either first, second, or third person. Then rewrite that passage in the other two points of view, only changing the pronouns. How does the change in POV affect the tone and feel of the story? 

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31. Soliloquy 

Soliloquy involves a character speaking their thoughts aloud, usually at length (and often in a Shakespeare play). The character in question may be alone or in the company of others, but they’re not speaking for the benefit of other people; the purpose of a soliloquy is for a character to reflect independently.

Example: Hamlet’s “to be or not to be” speech, in which he ruminates on the nature of life and death, is a classic dramatic soliloquy.

Exercise: Pick a character from your favorite book or movie and write a soliloquy from their point of view where they consider their thoughts and feelings on an important part of their story or character arc. 

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Tone refers to the overall mood and message of your book. It’s established through a variety of means, including voice, characterization, symbolism, and themes. Tone sets the feelings you want your readers to take away from the story.

Example: No matter how serious things get in The Good Place , there is always a chance for a character to redeem themselves by improving their behavior. The tone remains hopeful for the future of humanity in the face of overwhelming odds.

Exercise: Write a short paragraph in an upbeat tone. Now using the same situation you came up with, rewrite that passage in a darker or sadder tone. 

33. Tragicomedy

Tragicomedy is just what it sounds like: a blend of tragedy and comedy. Tragicomedy helps an audience process darker themes by allowing them to laugh at the situation even when circumstances are bleak.

Example: Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events uses wordplay, absurd situations, and over-the-top characters to provide humor in an otherwise tragic story.

Conceptual devices

34. allusion.

An allusion is a reference to a person, place, thing, concept, or other literary work that a reader is likely to recognize. A lot of meaning can be packed into an allusion and it’s often used to add depth to a story. Many works of classic Western literature will use allusions to the Bible to expand on or criticize the morals of their time. 

Example: “The two knitting women increase his anxiety by gazing at him and all the other sailors with knowing unconcern. Their eerie looks suggest that they know what will happen (the men dying), yet don’t care.” The two women knitting in this passage from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness are a reference to the Fates from Greek mythology, who decide the fate of humanity by spinning and cutting the threads of life.

Exercise: In a relatively simple piece of writing, see how many times you can use allusions. Go completely crazy. Once you’re finished, try to cut it down to a more reasonable amount and watch for how it creates deeper meaning in your piece. 

35. Analogy

An analogy connects two seemingly unrelated concepts to show their similarities and expand on a thought or idea. They are similar to metaphors and similes, but usually take the comparison much further than either of these literary devices as they are used to support a claim rather than provide imagery. 

Example: “ It has been well said that an author who expects results from a first novel is in a position similar to that of a man who drops a rose petal down the Grand Canyon of Arizona and listens for the echo.” — P.G. Wodehouse

Exercise: Pick two seemingly unrelated nouns and try to connect them with a verb to create an analogy. 

36. Anthropomorphism

To anthropomorphize is to apply human traits or qualities to a non-human thing such as objects, animals, or the weather. But unlike personification, in which this is done through figurative description, anthropomorphism is literal: a sun with a smiling face, for example, or talking dogs in a cartoon.

Examples: In Disney’s Beauty and the Beast , Mrs. Potts the teapot, Cogsworth the clock, and Lumière the candlestick are all household objects that act and behave like humans (which, of course, they were when they weren’t under a spell).

Similar term: personification

Exercise: Pick a non-human object and describe it as if it was human, literally ascribing human thoughts, feelings, and senses to it. 

adjectives in creative writing

37. Aphorism

An aphorism is a universally accepted truth stated in a concise, to-the-point way. Aphorisms are typically witty and memorable, often becoming adages or proverbs as people repeat them over and over.

Example: “To err is human, to forgive divine.” — Alexander Pope

38. Archetype

An archetype is a “universal symbol” that brings familiarity and context to a story. It can be a character, a setting, a theme, or an action. Archetypes represent feelings and situations that are shared across cultures and time periods, and are therefore instantly recognizable to any audience — for instance, the innocent child character, or the theme of the inevitability of death.

Example: Superman is a heroic archetype: noble, self-sacrificing, and drawn to righting injustice whenever he sees it.

Exercise: Pick an archetype — either a character or a theme — and use it to write a short piece centered around that idea. 

A cliché is a saying or idea that is used so often it becomes seen as unoriginal. These phrases might become so universal that, despite their once intriguing nature, they're now looked down upon as uninteresting and overused. 

Examples: Some common cliches you might have encountered are phrases like “easy as pie” and “light as a feather.” Some lines from famous books and movies have become so popular that they are now in and of themselves cliches such as Darth Vader’s stunning revelation from The Empire Strikes Back, “Luke, I am your father.” Also, many classic lines of Shakespeare are now considered cliches like, “All that glitters is not gold” from The Merchant of Venice. 

Exercise: Write a short passage using as many cliches as possible. Now try to cut them out and replace them with more original phrasing. See how the two passages compare. 

40. Colloquialism

Colloquialism is the use of casual and informal language in writing, which can also include slang. Writers use colloquialisms to provide context to settings and characters, and to make their writing sound more authentic. Imagine reading a YA novel that takes place in modern America, and the characters speak to each other like this:

“Good morning, Sue. I hope that you slept well and are prepared for this morning’s science exam.”

It’s not realistic. Colloquialisms help create believable dialogue :

“Hey Sue, what’d you get up to last night? This science test is gonna suck.”

Example: Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh takes place in Scotland, a fact made undeniably obvious by the dialect: “Thing is, as ye git aulder, this character-deficiency gig becomes mair sapping. Thir wis a time ah used tae say tae aw the teachers, bosses, dole punters, poll-tax guys, magistrates, when they telt me ah was deficient: ’Hi, cool it, gadge, ah’m jist me, jist intae a different sort ay gig fae youse but, ken?’”

Exercise: Write a dialogue between two characters as formally as possible. Now take that conversation and make it more colloquial. Imagine that you’re having this conversation with a friend. Mimic your own speech patterns as you write. 

41. Euphemism

A euphemism is an indirect, “polite” way of describing something too inappropriate or awkward to address directly. However, most people will still understand the truth about what's happening.

Example: When an elderly person is forced to retire, some might say they’re being “put out to pasture.”

Exercise: Write a paragraph where you say things very directly. Now rewrite that paragraph using only euphemisms. 

42. Hyperbole

Hyperbole is an exaggerated statement that emphasizes the significance of the statement’s actual meaning. When a friend says, "Oh my god, I haven't seen you in a million years," that's hyperbole.

Example: “At that time Bogotá was a remote, lugubrious city where an insomniac rain had been falling since the beginning of the 16th century.” — Living to Tell the Tale by Gabriel García Márquez

Exercise: Tall tales often make use of hyperbole to tell an exaggerated story. Use hyperbole to relate a completely mundane event or experience to turn it into a tall tale. 

43. Hypophora

Hypophora is much like a rhetorical question, wherein someone asks a question that doesn't require an answer. However, in hypophora, the person raises a question and answers it immediately themselves (hence the prefix hypo, meaning 'under' or 'before'). It’s often used when characters are reasoning something aloud.

Example: “Do you always watch for the longest day of the year and then miss it? I always watch for the longest day in the year and then miss it.” — Daisy in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

literary devices

An idiom is a saying that uses figurative language whose meaning differs from what it literally says. These phrases originate from common cultural experiences, even if that experience has long ago been forgotten. Without cultural context, idioms don’t often make sense and can be the toughest part for non-native speakers to understand. 

Example: In everyday use, idioms are fairly common. We say things like, “It’s raining cats and dogs” to say that it’s downpouring. 

Exercise: Idioms are often used in dialogue. Write a conversation between two people where idioms are used to express their main points. 

45. Imagery

Imagery appeals to readers’ senses through highly descriptive language. It’s crucial for any writer hoping to follow the rule of "show, don’t tell," as strong imagery truly paints a picture of the scene at hand.

Example: “In the hard-packed dirt of the midway, after the glaring lights are out and the people have gone to bed, you will find a veritable treasure of popcorn fragments, frozen custard dribblings, candied apples abandoned by tired children, sugar fluff crystals, salted almonds, popsicles, partially gnawed ice cream cones and wooden sticks of lollipops.” — Charlotte's Web by E.B. White

Exercise: Choose an object, image, or idea and use the five senses to describe it. 

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Irony creates a contrast between how things seem and how they really are. There are three types of literary irony : dramatic (when readers know what will happen before characters do), situational (when readers expect a certain outcome, only to be surprised by a turn of events), and verbal (when the intended meaning of a statement is the opposite of what was said).

Example: This opening scene from Orson Welles’ A Touch of Evil is a great example of how dramatic irony can create tension.

47. Juxtaposition

Juxtaposition places two or more dissimilar characters, themes, concepts, etc. side by side, and the profound contrast highlights their differences. Why is juxtaposition such an effective literary device? Well, because sometimes the best way for us to understand something is by understanding what it’s not .

Example: In the opening lines of A Tale of Two Cities , Charles Dickens uses juxtaposition to emphasize the societal disparity that led to the French Revolution: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness…”

Similar terms: oxymoron, paradox

Exercise: Pick two ideas, objects, places, or people that seem like complete opposites. Introduce them side by side in the beginning of your piece and highlight their similarities and differences throughout. 

48. Metaphor

A metaphor compares two similar things by saying that one of them is the other. As you'd likely expect, when it comes to literary devices, this one is a heavy hitter. And if a standard metaphor doesn't do the trick, a writer can always try an extended metaphor : a metaphor that expands on the initial comparison through more elaborate parallels.

Example: Metaphors are literature’s bread and butter (metaphor intended) — good luck finding a novel that is free of them. Here’s one from Frances Hardinge’s A Face Like Glass : “Wishes are thorns, he told himself sharply. They do us no good, just stick into our skin and hurt us.”

Similar term: simile

Exercise: Write two lists: one with tangible objects and the other concepts. Mixing and matching, try to create metaphors where you describe the concepts using physical objects.

One metaphor example not enough? Check out this post , which has 97 of ‘em!

49. Metonymy

Metonymy is like symbolism, but even more so. A metonym doesn’t just symbolize something else, it comes to serve as a synonym for that thing or things — typically, a single object embodies an entire institution.

Examples: “The crown” representing the monarchy, “Washington” representing the U.S. government.

Similar term: synecdoche

Exercise: Create a list of ten common metonymies you might encounter in everyday life and speech.

Whatever form a motif takes, it recurs throughout the novel and helps develop the theme of the narrative. This might be a symbol, concept, or image.

Example: In Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, trains are an omnipresent motif that symbolize transition, derailment, and ultimately violent death and destruction.

Similar term: symbol

Exercise: Pick a famous book or movie and see if you can identify any common motifs within it. 

51. Non sequitur

Non sequiturs are statements that don't logically follow what precedes them. They’ll often be quite absurd and can lend humor to a story. But they’re just not good for making jokes. They can highlight missing information or a miscommunication between characters and even be used for dramatic effect. 

Example: “It was a spring day, the sort that gives people hope: all soft winds and delicate smells of warm earth. Suicide weather.” — Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen 

Exercise: Write a conversation that gets entirely derailed by seemingly unrelated non sequiturs. 

52. Paradox

Paradox derives from the Greek word paradoxon , which means “beyond belief.” It’s a statement that asks people to think outside the box by providing seemingly illogical — and yet actually true — premises.

Example: In George Orwell’s 1984 , the slogan of the totalitarian government is built on paradoxes: “War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength.” While we might read these statements as obviously contradictory, in the context of Orwell’s novel, these blatantly corrupt sentiments have become an accepted truth.

Similar terms: oxymoron, juxtaposition

Exercise: Try writing your own paradox. First, think of two opposing ideas that can be juxtaposed against each other. Then, create a situation where these contradictions coexist with each other. What can you gather from this unique perspective?

53. Personification

Personification uses human traits to describe non-human things. Again, while the aforementioned anthropomorphism actually applies these traits to non-human things, personification means the behavior of the thing does not actually change. It's personhood in figurative language only.

Example: “Just before it was dark, as they passed a great island of Sargasso weed that heaved and swung in the light sea as though the ocean were making love with something under a yellow blanket, his small line was taken by a dolphin.” — The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Similar term: anthropomorphism

Exercise: Pick a non-human object and describe it using human traits, this time using similes and metaphors rather than directly ascribing human traits to it. 

54. Rhetorical question

A rhetorical question is asked to create an effect rather than to solicit an answer from the listener or reader. Often it has an obvious answer and the point of asking is to create emphasis. It’s a great way to get an audience to consider the topic at hand and make a statement. 

Example: “If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?” — The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

Writers use satire to make fun of some aspect of human nature or society — usually through exaggeration, ridicule, or irony. There are countless ways to satirize something; most of the time, you know it when you read it.

Example: The famous adventure novel Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift is a classic example of satire, poking fun at “travelers' tales,” the government, and indeed human nature itself.

A simile draws resemblance between two things by saying “Thing A is like Thing B,” or “Thing A is as [adjective] as Thing B.” Unlike a metaphor, a similar does not posit that these things are the same, only that they are alike. As a result, it is probably the most common literary device in writing — you can almost always recognize a simile through the use of “like” or “as.”

Example: There are two similes in this description from Circe by Madeline Miller: “The ships were golden and huge as leviathans, their rails carved from ivory and horn. They were towed by grinning dolphins or else crewed by fifty black-haired nereids, faces silver as moonlight.”

Similar term: metaphor

57. Symbolism

Authors turn to tangible symbols to represent abstract concepts and ideas in their stories  Symbols typically derive from objects or non-humans — for instance, a dove might represent peace, or a raven might represent death.

Example: In The Great Gatsby , Fitzgerald uses the eyes of Doctor T.J. Eckleburg (actually a faded optometrist's billboard) to represent God and his judgment of the Jazz Age.

Similar term: motif

Exercise: Choose an object that you want to represent something — like an idea or concept. Now, write a poem or short story centered around that symbol. 

58. Synecdoche

Synecdoche is the usage of a part to represent the whole. That is, rather than an object or title that’s merely associated with the larger concept (as in metonymy), synecdoche must actually be attached in some way: either to the name, or to the larger whole itself.

Examples: “Stanford won the game” ( Stanford referring to the full title of the Stanford football team) or “Nice wheels you got there” ( wheels referring to the entire car)

Similar term: metonymy

Zeugma is when one word is used to ascribe two separate meanings to two other words. This literary device is great for adding humor and figurative flair as it tends to surprise the reader. And it’s just a fun type of wordplay. 

Example: “ Yet time and her aunt moved slowly — and her patience and her ideas were nearly worn out before the tete-a-tete was over.” — Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

60. Zoomorphism 

Zoomorphism is when you take animal traits and assign them to anything that’s not an animal. It’s the opposite of anthropomorphism and personification, and can be either a physical manifestation, such as a god appearing as an animal, or a comparison, like calling someone a busy bee .

Example: When vampires turn into bats, their bat form is an instance of zoomorphism.

Exercise: Describe a human or object by using traits that are usually associated with animals. 

Similar terms: anthropomorphism, personification

Readers and writers alike can get a lot out of understanding literary devices and how they're used. Readers can use them to gain insight into the author’s intended meaning behind their work, while writers can use literary devices to better connect with readers. But whatever your motivation for learning them, you certainly won't be sorry you did! (Not least because you'll recognize the device I just used in that sentence. 😏)

6 responses

Ron B. Saunders says:

16/01/2019 – 19:26

Paraprosdokians are also delightful literary devices for creating surprise or intrigue. They cause a reader to rethink a concept or traditional expectation. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraprosdokian)

ManhattanMinx says:

17/01/2019 – 02:07

That's pore, not pour. Shame.....

↪️ Coline Harmon replied:

14/06/2019 – 19:06

It was a Malapropism

↪️ JC JC replied:

23/10/2019 – 00:02

Yeah ManhattanMinx. It's a Malepropism!

↪️ jesus replied:

07/11/2019 – 13:24

Susan McGrath says:

10/03/2020 – 10:56

"But whatever your motivation for learning them, you certainly won't be sorry you did! (Not least because you'll recognize the device I just used in that sentence. 😏)" Litote

Comments are currently closed.

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List of Adjectives : Types and How They Are Used

Are you looking for the perfect word to describe someone, somewhere, or something? If so, there are many great words to choose from in the English language. Yet, without a list of adjectives on hand, it’s hard to remember every single word you know. 

Luckily, you have access to this helpful adjectives list ! Use it whenever you want a fresh and exciting way to talk about a noun or pronoun. Plus, if you study new words on this adjective list, you’ll expand your vocabulary. For a printable PDF to keep on your desk, visit this informative site.

There are many different words on a list of adjectives . Some are similar in nature or have identical meanings , while others are very different from one another. Because there are so many adjectives , it’s better to learn them all in their individual groups.

There are two main categories of words you’ll find on a list of adjectives : Descriptive words and limiting words . Each has its own adjective list subcategories. Here’s an overview of what is covered in this guide:

Attributive and Predicate Words

Cardinal adjective list, definite and indefinite articles, demonstrative adjective list, interrogative adjective list, nouns that function as limiting words, ordinal words, possessive words, proper words.

  • Advanced Descriptive Adjectives List
  • List of Adjectives for Kids
  • Personality Adjectives List

General List of Positive Adjectives

A list of adjectives of sensory words.

Let’s begin with a descriptive adjectives list and the subcategories of descriptive words.

A Descriptive Adjectives List

In short, descriptive words describe things. Here are some common examples below. This could also be a list of adjectives for kids :

List of positive adjectives :

List of negative adjectives:

List of general adjectives (positive or negative depending on context):

You’ve probably heard all of the words on this descriptive adjectives list before. To learn a few more advanced descriptive words, go to the section “ A List Adjectives for…”

Many descriptive adjectives can also be paired as opposites of each other. Below is a descriptive adjectives list with pairs of opposite words. You’ll recognize a few words from the list of positive adjectives, list of negative adjectives, and list of general adjectives.

Within descriptive words, there are two subcategories: attributive and predicate words. Both subcategories are similar in that they both modify a noun. However, both do things a bit differently and have slightly different use s. 

Attributive and predicate words are like two sides of the same coin. You can find attributive words in a sentence directly beside a noun. Most of the time, it comes before the noun or pronoun. 

  • The leaping lizard.
  • An argumentative anteater.
  • The humongous hippo.

Predicative words on the other hand come after a noun, following a verb. A predicate gets its name from being within the predicate of the sentence.

  • She has wavy hair.
  • Jeffrey is jovial .
  • Is your crossword puzzle fun ?
  • Our flight was exhausting .

Below is a good-sized adjectives list . Depending on the sentence, some of these words could function as either an attributive or predicative word. However, some can only function as one or the other. 

Can you figure out which words only fit as an attributive (before a noun) or predicative (after a noun and verb) word?

Finding this all a little challenging? Skip to the “A List of Adjectives for…” section. There is a general list of positive adjectives , a personality adjectives list , a li st of adjectives for kids , and more!

A Limiting Adjectives List

The second category of adjectives contains limiting words. Whereas some words describe nouns, many do not. These words instead restrict nouns and pronouns . Limiting words let a reader or listener know the exact thing you’re talking about, by defining it. 

There are many subcategories of limiting adjectives/words . But don’t worry, there’s a description of each type below, and there’s an adjectives list for each subcategory for you to review. Here’s a list of adjectives that features a few common limiting words:

This list of adjectives has words that don’t seem very similar to each other. However, each fits into a different subcategory of limiting words that we will explore next.

Cardinal words are easy to remember. Basically, they tell you the number of a noun.

  • I have over fifty gel pens in my backpack.
  • Is it possible for Tim to have three best friends?
  • She’s seen this movie at least one hundred times already.

Here’s a short cardinal adjectives list:

  • Eighty-seven
  • One million five hundred thirty-six thousand seven hundred and forty-two.

That’s right! Any numbers you can think of can become cardinal words!

Before you move on to the next type of limiting word, learn a thing or two about APA format . Then afterward, if you need help checking your writing, visit this helpful paper checker .

The definite article defines a specific noun. An indefinite article points to a nonspecific noun. There’s one definite article, the , and two indefinite articles, a and an .+

  • The cat on top of my hat.
  • Is there a cat on top of my hat?
  • But mommy, I want a crocodile for Christmas!

You may already know the demonstrative pronouns:  

If you do, then you already know all the demonstrative words. Each one makes the demonstrative adjectives list because each one can modify a noun or noun phrase.

  • This music is amazing.
  • That book is a best-seller.
  • Those boys are twins.

Similarly, the interrogative list of adjectives contains the same words you find on an interrogative pronoun list. These words are what and which . Again, in this use, what and which modify a noun or noun phrase.

  • Which glass is Frank’s? He’d like more water please.
  • What movie would you like to watch? Peter Pan is a classic.

One of the most interesting occurrences is when one part of speech imitates another. That’s exactly what happens when you have nouns that function as limiting words.

  • A production factory.
  • Steven’s a showboat actor.
  • I’m going to the video game museum.

An ordinal word tells you the order of a noun in a series.

  • I enjoyed the first Karate Kid movie.
  • I thought the second Back to the Future movie was best.

An ordinal adjectives list contains words like forth, sixtieth, and even seven hundred and first.

Possessive words explain who has ownership or possession of something.

A short adjectives list showing possession includes: my, your, our, his, her, its , and their .

  • Please return my pen.
  • Your hat is over there.
  • Their food is getting cold.

You capitalize a proper word because it’s derived from a proper noun.

  • I think I’ll try your American coffee blend.
  • Can she try a slice of your homemade Russian honey cake?
  • Would you like French fries with that?

A List of Adjectives for …

Now that you know the basics, further expand your adjective knowledge by checking out a few other lists below. We’ll cover more advanced descriptive adjectives, a list of adjectives for kids , a personality adjectives list , a list of positive adjectives , and finally a list of adjectives for sensory words. For another printable PDF, click to this site.

An Additional Descriptive Adjectives List

This list includes more advanced descriptive adjectives than listed previously.

  • Comprehensive
  • Efficacious
  • Investigative

Are there any words that you don’t know? DoOn’t fret! It only takes a minute to look them up in a dictionary.

L ist of Adjectives for Kids

Words that are great for children include:

A Personality Adjectives List

There are many words that describe personality. We’ve divided up this list into two sections: A positive personality adjectives list , and a negative personality adjectives list . Let’s start with a few positive ones.

Positive Personality Adjectives List:

  • Hardworking
  • Understanding

To complement the list of positive adjectives above, we’ve included a negative list of adjectives next.

Negative Personality Adjectives List:

  • Irresponsible

The list of positive adjectives shares a few excellent describing words, including:

This list of adjectives touches upon words that relate to our five senses: Touch, taste, smell, hearing, and sight. Each type gives a few adjective examples.

Touch List of Adjectives:

Taste List of Adjectives:

Smell List of Adjectives:

Hearing List of Adjectives:

  • High-pitched

Sight List of Adjectives:

Congratulations on learning so many adjectives! You’ve gone from learning what descriptive and limiting words are, to memorizing a personality adjectives list, to revising a list of adjectives for kids. Now that you’re done, take a few minutes to learn about MLA format and more styles of citation for your next English paper!

Published March 9, 2019. Updated May 22, 2020.

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A Backpacker's Tale

500 Descriptive Words To Improve Your Writing

adjectives in creative writing

These  descriptive words  will help improve your writing. All these  describing words  are from my own personal notes. I’m an avid, and active, reader, and over the last couple of years I’ve jotted down the descriptive words that I pop out to me.

This list of descriptive words for writing was born from a desire to become enhance my vocabulary and become a better storyteller, and writer. Three things I care a lot about – just a  fun fact about me .

I’ve learned over time – and with many failures – that working with describing words on a page is akin to a potter at the molding wheel. And as writers, we use them to slowly shape our stories whether it’s writing about  driving around the world  or inspiring people to create their own list of  bucket list ideas .

The list is separated by  parts of speech ; You’ll find a list of adjectives, descriptive phrases, action verbs, and more.

At the end are some phrases I like, that I have read here or there over the years. Make sure to check out our  list of descriptive adjectives  as well.

I hope you use this  list of descriptive words , and phrases and garner inspiration to enhance your tales.

500 Describing Words to Improve Your Writing

“This is one of the best resources I’ve come across in a long time…”

Get our Descriptive Word Cheat Sheet for FREE . You’ll get immediate access to our PDF cheat sheet of Descriptive Words. A resource you won’t find elsewhere. Perfect for papers, writing and resumes!

adjectives in creative writing

1 – although.

“he was making headway, albeit rather slowly.”

1 – very typical of a certain kind of person or thing.

“the archetypal country doctor”

1 – without purpose or direction.

“Don’t live an aimless life.”

1 – To face or endure danger or pain; showing courage.

The brave healthcare workers are putting their life on the line.

1 – perplexed and confused; very puzzled.

“I had a bewildered look on my face”

1 – giving out or reflecting a lot of light; shining.

The sun was bright in his eyes.

2 – vivid and bold color.

The grass in Ireland is bright green.

1 – Bright or Radiant.

The brilliant light was blinding.

1 – Clever or Smart

He was a brilliant student. He always chose to use the right word.

1 – unlimited, infinite, or immense.

The boundless energy of the kid wore me out.

1 – socially unconventional in a way regarded as characteristic of creative

Running this  travel blog  has led me to live a boho life.

2 – woman’s fashion aesthetic is characterized by flowing print fabrics, layers of clothing, and costume jewelry such as long strings of beads, dangling earrings, and multiple bangles.

she went for the boho look in a floor-length green dress teamed with a fringed  jacket  and chandelier earrings.

1 – hurt by repeated blows or punishment.

he finished the day battered and bruised.

2 – damaged by age or used repeatedly.

I finished the day battered and bruised.

1 – a taste sensation that is peculiarly sharp or acrid.

The bitter fruit tasted terrible.

1 – lacking due thought or consideration

Zack Morris showed a blithe disregard for the rules.

2 – Happy or Lighthearted Character

Want to watch a blithe romantic comedy?

1 – having a blue tinge; somewhat blue.

The bluish tint of the water was stylish.

1 – Lost in deep sadness of thought.

The kid was brooding that his parents wouldn’t buy the toy.

1 – having the characteristic of a baby.

He acted babyish when he lost the game.

1 – not fake; or counterfeit

This is a bona fide masterpiece.

1 – lose or hanging.

My eyes are baggy after a red-eye flight.

1 – loved very dearly.

The teacher was beloved by his students.

1 – a low murmuring or humming sound.

The buzzing bee flew across the park.

1 – strong, or strongly built.

The burly bear was intimidating.

1 – having a lot of bounce.

The trampoline was extra bouncy.

2 – confident or having a jaunty rhythm.

The man was bouncy and full of life.

1 – very apt to stay afloat.

The pool floaty was extremely buoyant.

2 – cheerful.

The buoyant salesman was very charming.

1 – lacking plants or life.

The bleak desert was barren.

2 – Cold and Miserable Outlook.

After his divorce, he had a bleak outlook on life.

1 – expressing or marked by earnest entreaty or pleading.

The beseeching peasant feared for his life.

1 – having the taste of butter.

The buttery bread warmed the soul.

1 – having feelings or actions control or remaining calm.

Even though he was afraid he remained composed.

1 – caverns in either size, shape, or atmosphere.

The cavernous mansion stood empty.

2 – Giving the impression of dark and vast.

The cavernous eyes.

1 – a series of columns set at specific intervals, and supporting a roof.

The ancient marble colonnades are just one reason to explore the  best islands in Greece .

1 – free from worry or anxiety.

he was a carefree soul.

1 – having a rough texture; large grains.

The treated wood was coarse.

1 – anxious to protect or avoid potential danger or mishaps.

he was careful not to get into trouble.

1 – making or liable to make a harsh, high-pitched sound when being moved or when pressure or weight is applied.

“I climbed the creaky stairs”

1 – dirt free, unmarked, or have been washed.

the room was clean.

1 – having a wavy outline

The crenelated coast when  backpacking Thailand  is breathtaking. ..

1 – covered by clouds.

It was too cloudy to go hiking.

1 – present from birth.

“a congenital defect of the heart.”

1 – a striking array of colors.

The colorful painting lit up the room.

1 – rude language.

They didn’t allow the colorful speech to get past the sensors.

1 – Happy / Sprightly

He was chipper after getting  married in Sweden .

1 – rude shortness

The curt manager’s comments angered the waiter.

1 – confused

The chef was confounded by the dinner tickets.

1 – continuing occurrence

I suffer from chronic indigestion.

2 – present and encountered.

Chronic meddling always causes problems.

1 – relating to the community / Collective ownership.

The communal garden gives us great vegetables every year.

1 – huge in size, power, or stupendous.

The colossal rocks blocked the dusty path.

1 – pleasing

Chicago food  has some of the most delectable meals I’ve ever had.

1 – delicate

The dainty glass broke from the fall.

2 – tasty

The dainty sandwich was filling.

1 – untidy in appearance

Boys often have a disheveled room.

1 – devoted to a cause or purpose

Star Wars has dedicated fans.

2 – given a purpose

He has a dedicated server to protect his data.

1 – awarded or received marks of honor.

He was decorated with a medal for winning the race.

2 – furnished with something ornamental

A hallmark of the parade are the decorated floats.

1 – chosen but not yet installed

the ambassador designates the future assignments.

He has a designated server to protect his data.

1 – bright, brilliant, or showy, colorful, and impressive.

The dazzling fireworks were the highlight of the festival.

1 – eating food quickly.

The Lion is a devouring beast.

2 – destructively consuming/absorbing

Don’t let devouring loneliness defeat you.

1 – below / far from the surface

His joy was buried deep below the surface of an ocean of swirling emotions.

Deep-Pocketed 

1- Having a great deal of money; being wealthy.

The deep-pocketed businessman donated a large sum of money to the charity. 

Disagreeable 

1- Having a disposition that is not pleasant or agreeable; disagreeable behavior or remarks.

“I’m sorry I was so disagreeable earlier. I had a really bad day.” 

DILAPIDATED

1 – fallen into decay or deteriorated

The dilapidated home needed an intense amount of love and care.

1 – serving for ornamental decoration.

The decorative replica was made to be displayed. And invoked a strong emotion.

1 – moving from the common direction.

Do follow the popular path. Instead, go into the unknown, and discover your divergent path.

Compassionate 

1 – Showing concern and sympathy for others, especially those in distress.

When I saw the homeless man on the side of the road, I felt compassion for him and wished I could help him. 

Entertaining  

1 – A movie that is enjoyable and amusing.

The new comedy starring Melissa McCarthy was very entertaining. 

1 – hard to pin down, identify, or isolate.

They knew the elusive thief lurked nearby.

1 – enthusiastic joy

They were exuberant about their upcoming trip to some of the  most beautiful places in the world .

1 – vertical position

Few erect columns were peppered throughout the temple ruins.

1 – having the ability to expand.

The expansive landscape is seemingly never-ending.

1 – deriving style, ideas, and taste from a wide range of sources.

The eclectic mix of opinions caused an argument.

EXASPERATING

1 – cause a strong feeling of annoyance

The planes exasperating delay made everyone late.

1 – fully detailed or well planned.

The elaborate design of Bangkok’s royal palace is breathtaking.

1 – uttered, or emphasizing on.

The emphatic refusal helped them close the deal.

1 – productive / desired effects.

The efficient writer finished before the deadline.

2 – being involved or an immediate agent.

The efficient action helped make a change.

EVER-DEEPENING

1 – go deeper

He had an ever-deepening love for sports.

1 – thorough / all possibilities

The exhaustive to-do list was intimidating.

1 – seemingly without end

The endless forest instilled a mood of tranquility.

EXTRAVAGANT

1 – exceeding normal limits or excessively elaborate

The extravagant building is grand.

2 – extremely high in price

The extravagant purchase maxed out his credit card purchase.

1 – elegance

The elegant clothes belonged to the king.

1 – relating to or named after

The eponymous landscape outside Dingle is one of the  best places to visit in Ireland .

1 – relating to a celebration,  festival , or feast.

The festive dinner got a little out of hand.

1 – tinged with red in the face, from shame, heat, or physical exertion.

Caught in a lie, his face became flushed with embarrassment.

1 – very hot or passionate desire.

I have a fervent desire to explore the world.

FAST-MOVING

1 – moving quickly

The fast-moving current washed away our supplies.

FANTASTICAL

1 – based on fantasy

Game of Thrones takes place in a fantastical world, filled with dragons, and magic.

1 – unrestrained violence or brutality

The ferocious lion hunted his prey.

1 – having to do with the burial.

They found treasure in the Pharaoh’s funerary chamber.

1 – focused on something.

The dog was fixated on the squirrel.

1 – loving having fun.

The fun-loving locals love putting on their annual festival.

1 – covered with grass

The grassy knolls are stunning.

1 – a large number of

He had charm galore.

1 – repulsion, or inspiring horror.

The movie was too gruesome for me.

1 – possessing glory

When  backpacking New Zealand  you see glorious landscapes. 

Good-Looking 

1 – Very good-looking, or beautiful. Can be used to describe people, things, or places. For example, “She is a glorious sight in that dress.” 

1 – painful or distressing

It was a harrowing adventure filled with an unexpected twists, turns, and sacrifices.

1 – an unrestrained expression

I was greeted with a hearty welcome.

2 – wholesome or substantial

I enjoyed the hearty meal.

1 – relating to an herb

Those herbaceous florae were savory.

1 – alone

He was isolated during the exam.

INTOLERABLE

1 – not tolerable or unbearable

The intolerable noise kept me up all night.

1 – picturesque or pleasing

The idyllic Irish landscapes are some of the best in Europe.

1 – great in size or degree

Our immense Universe is without limits.

1 – extreme degree

The intense amount of work was overbearing.

1 – irk or tedious

Sometimes we all have to do Irksome tasks.

1 – prone to act, acting momentarily

To lose weight sometimes we have to deny our impulses for bad food.

1 – tempting

The inviting meal made my mouth water.

1 – existing in, or belonging to

The innate behavior of a child was to cause trouble.

1 – memorable or cannot be washed away or erased.

The indelible landscape means there are hundreds of  places to visit in the United States .

INFURIATING

1 – the feeling of extreme anger.

The infuriating delay at the airport made him miss his flight.

1 – spotless / extremely clean

Singapore is an immaculately clean country.

2 – having no flaw

The glass in Venice is immaculate.

1 – having many complex parts

Mona Lisa is an intricate painting. Making it the most famous in the world.

1 – belonging to the inside,

I great battles happen inside the interior of our minds.

1 – sprightly

he took a jaunty stroll through the park.

1 – having a disorienting effect

The jarring truth is that dreams without goals, remain dreams.

1 – ready, or in favor of

I am keen to go to the bar.

2 – sensitive perception

He had a keen nose.

1 – having lungs

The lunged fish swan in the pond.

1 – transparent or clear; Glasslike

The limpid waters in Thailand or famed around the world.

1 – expending or bestowing excess

The lavish palace of Versailles is one of the most popular  day trips from Paris .

1 – outlandish, or eccentric

Some ludicrous movies aren’t bad.

1 – filled with desire or lust

She was filled with lascivious thoughts.

1 – lack of interest, or energy

His listless attitude held him back in life.

1 – sad or lonely

Ah, the lonesome road, has many trails, but many rewards.

1 – highly significant, outstanding

The monumental task can be accomplished by taking little steps every day.

1 – expressing sadness

A melancholy nature will keep you stuck.

MERITORIOUS

1 – deserving reward or praise.

A meritorious life of service.

1 – intrusive or getting involved in

The meddlesome raccoon knocked over the trash can.

1 – Huge, exceedingly large

Many of the mammoth  caves in the United States  are worth visiting.

1 – existing today

Many modern-day advances give our lives ease.

1 – inferior in size or degree

The minor problems in life or nothing to sweat over –  life is too short .

1 – covered by mist.

The heavy air of the misty morning endowed the park with an eerie coolness.

1 – covered by mystery

The monk has a mysterious nature.

OUT-OF-PLACE

1 – not where it should be

The restaurant felt out of place.

1 – elaborate or excessively decorated

The ornate .ruins draw in visitors.

OUTSTANDING

1 – standing out

His outstanding skills put him in line for a promotion.

2 – unpaid

Outstanding bills can be stressful.

1 – lack of sharpness

His obtuse answer made no sense.

1 – lacking remembrance, or memory

Don’t be oblivious to the opportunities that life presents you.

1 – wealth, abundance

The opulent hotel is worth the price tag.

1 – characteristic of a person

His hot temper was peculiar.

2 – different from the normal

The book had a particular plot twist in the book.

1 – not spoiled, or corrupted

The pristine beaches had soft sand.

2 – earliest state

The pristine state of the forest

1 – a sense of peace

The peaceful forest instilled a peace of tranquility.

1 – argumentative quarrelsome

He has a pugnacious nature.

1 – mental and emotional state of fear

Don’t panic. Breathe and slow down.

1 – able to be passed

The currents were passable during the low tide.

1 – turning, a pivot

Taking my first trip to Ireland was a pivotal moment in my life.

1 – critical

It was a pivotal piece of the puzzle.

1 – polishing, smooth, glossy

Polish your writing before publishing the piece.

1 – by or in itself

That’s not the facts per se, but valuable to know.

1 – notably luxurious or rich

His plush life made him soft.

1 – elevated or arrogant

The pompous rhetoric is hurtful.

2- exhibiting an air of self-importance.

The pompous politician lost sight of his vision.

1 – extreme or severe

After rigorous training, he was ready to test himself.

Sidesplitting 

1 – When something is so funny that it causes one’s sides to split, it is side-splitting.

My mom’s joke was sidesplittingly funny.

1 – like thunder

The thunderous roar of the waves beating along the coast.

DESCRIPTIVE WORDS FOR WRITING: ACTION and Strong VERBS

These are some of the best words. They are great when wanting to show a clear meaning of a sentence or improve a short story.

1- regard something as being caused by.

I attribute my grammar skill to how many questions I ask.

1 – provide clear evidence; declare that something exist.

I attest that life is good

1 – make minor changes.

I had to amend your application before sending it in.

1 – regard (an object, quality, or person) with respect or warm approval.

I admire your commitment to learning the English Language.

1 – praise enthusiastically

I acclaimed actor won the best actor for his deep performance.

1 – achieve or complete successfully.

I accomplish my goals.

1 – increase in sound

They amplify the sound at the concert.

2 – make copies of something

The notes amplify that new evidence. ..

1 – change, or make changes too

They altered the rules of the game.

1 – (of a problem, opportunity, or situation) emerge; become apparent.

“a string of new difficulties have arisen “

2 – get or stand up.

“he arose at 5:30 to work out.”

1 – to clear out or save (Usually water from a boat)

They bailed him out of trouble.

1 – talk enthusiastically for a long time

Just one of the many  fun facts about me . Sometimes I like to babble about travel.

1 – to set upon

We were beset with locals trying to make a sale.

2 – to set with ornaments

The roses are beset with thrones.

1 – fail to give a true notion or impression of (something); disguise or contradict.

I newspaper story belied the facts.

2 – fail to fulfill or justify (a claim or expectation); betray.

The notebooks belie Darwin’s later recollection.

1 – hit repeatedly with blows.

He battered the broken car.

1 – become perplexed.

I was bewildered by the lack of work the team had done.

1 – bend the head or upper part of the body as a sign of respect, greeting, or shame.

It is common to bow in Asia.

2 – play (a stringed instrument or music) using a bow.

The techniques by which the pieces were bowed.

1 – think deeply about something that makes the person unhappy.

He brooded over his bad day.

1 – encourage or help

I need to boost my spirits.

2 – push from below

She needs to boost to master the English Language.

1 – cast a spell or enchant.

I was bewitched by the lush landscape.

1 – low murmuring or humming sound.

Flies buzz when they fly.

1 – lock with a bar that slides into a socket.

He bolted the door for protection.

2 – ran away quickly.

He bolted down the street.

1 – strike hard.

He bashed the wall in anger.

2 – criticize.

He bashed the smoking industry.

1 – break or burst

They bust the water balloon.

2 – lose something

He went bust at the poker table…

1 – squeeze together

Compress the laptop’s file to save space.

1 – to bring to an end.

The summit concluded with world peace.

2 – to reach a logical end or decision.

The magazine concludes that Rome is one of the  most beautiful cities in the world .

He concluded his college application with a question.

1 – unmarked, free dirt

He cleaned the room every other week.

1 – fall or hang in copious or luxuriant quantities.

“the cool water cascading down the waterfall.”

1 – decrease in size, number, or range.

“glass contracts as it cools.”

2 – become shorter and tighter to affect the movement of part of the body.

“The heart is a muscle that contracts about seventy times a minute”

1 – wind into rings

The sailor coiled the rope.

1 – to cover something

Massive trees canopied the small island.

1 – to form short bends or ripples / Wrinkle

Don’t crinkle my shirt.

2 – a think crackling sound

The crinkling bag woke up the dog.

1 – chuckle or laugh

He chortled with amusement.

2 – sing or chant

She chortled in her happiness.

1 – broken into small parts.

The  Greek Islands  are filled with crumbling ruins.

1 – beg or sponge

He cadges for a free cup of coffee.

1 – sharp, quick, repeated noises

The crackling fire.

1 – to dig and bring to light.

Don’t dredge up those painful memories.

1 – travel somewhere in a hurry

I dashed through the forest.

2 – strike, or destroy

The ship was dashed upon the rocks.

She dashed his spirits.

1 – cause (someone) to feel consternation and distress.

A deep  feeling  of dismay overtook the room.

1 – greatly astonish or amaze

I’m often dumbfounded after watching the task force meetings.

1 – eat / destroy / adsorb quickly

I want to devour the big meal.

2 – read eagerly

Amy always devours a good book.

1 – make (someone’s) clothes or hair messy.

Boris Johnson disheveled his hair before being on camera.

1 – to lessen the courage of

A lesser man would be daunted by this challenge.

1 – to set apart for a purpose. to distinguish as a class

We designate this room as the class lab.

2 – to point out a location

A marker designating where the trial starts.

1 – to feel aversion to (Offend)

His distaste for the joke was apparent.

1 – to dig

Suspicion led him to delve into his wife’s bag.

1 – to search for information

He delved into the past to find the problem.

1 – to get carried along (by water, air, etc)

The windy drift pushed the hot air balloon to the west.

1 – a pile of something in heaps

Snow drifts covered the landscape.

1 – to stray or move from a principle, standard, or topic.

Don’t deviate from your goals. Stayed focused even when life is tough.

1 – to cause annoyance or irritation

I hope you’re not exasperated by this list of descriptive words.

1 – Set up / to fix/put together in an upright position

The father and son erected the tree house.

1 – to become known,

Jane emerged from her travels a most well-rounded person.

1 – To make it ornamental or make it more attractive.

Frank embellished his life story to impress his date.

1 – to furnish / to provide with

I’m endowed with a  good sense of humor .

1 – allure or tempt

He was enticed by the smell of the chocolate.

1 – eliminate by wearing away surface

The rocks are effaced by wear and tear.

1 – rot slowly

Don’t let your anger fester about your tough English test.

1 – steal secretly

He filches the cookie from the jar.

1 – give a false appearance

The company feigned how bad his leg hurt.

1 – containing frescoes

The frescoed walls of the chapel inspired my love of art.

1 – to pass quickly or shift

The chortling birds flitted around the forest.

1 – to flow in an irregular current

The stream gurgling stream swept over the rocks.

2 – ta gurgling sound

The gurgling stream blocked the path.

1 – to gather,

Tim garnered his courage before presenting his  essay  to his teachers.

1 – move quickly

He hastened his journey home.

1 – lift or raise by tackle

Hoist the flag.

1 – lift or raise or pull

He heaved the trunk onto the oak table.

1 – a harmful or disquieting occurrence

The past mistakes haunted him.

2 – to visit often to seek the company of

I spend a lot of time haunting the bookstore.

1 – cross one with another.

The intertwined vines were impassable.

1 – place a body in a tomb or grave

The king was interred with all the honor due him.

1 – weave.

It’s dangerous to interweave lies and the truth.

1 – to make, irritated, or weary

He was irked trying to learn all the  English grammar  rules.

1 – endow or influence

He imbued the spirit of the old times.

INTERSPERSE

1 – spaced in intervals

The interspersed paintings covered the east wing.

1 – sharp uneven surface

The jagged mountains dotted the horizon.

1 – come into contact or pushing

The jostling crowd flooded to the door.

2 – vying for a position.

The workers began to jostle for the new job.

1 – expend or bestow

His lavish habits cost him a lot of money.

1 – slow parting

The effects lingered long after it was over.

1 – take a large shape or an impending occurrence

The  teacher  loomed over the  student  to make sure he wasn’t cheating.

1 – an area to stop

Lay-by the dock the ship tied up.

1 – utter barely audible sounds in a low voice.

He muttered to himself about his workload.

1 – hypnotizing

The mesmerizing beauty of the  best islands in Croatia  is not easily forgotten.

1 – settle snugly

A small town nestled among the mountains.

1 – grab or catch

He nabbed the best spot in the class for the  English lesson .

1 – a slow trickle, to seep out of something

The oozing gunk stained the floor.

1 – exiled

He was ostracized after his betrayal was made public.

1 – to peer through / to look furtively.

Don’t peek around the corner.

1 – to go deep into, or thrust into something.

I plunged into the task of self-development.

1 – landscape with a level surface, and little change

He wandered the plateau looking for his lost wallet.

1 – search for information.

His friend probed him with questions about the girl.

1 – sprinkled throughout

The olive trees peppered the Greek countryside.

1 – work laboriously

The book plodded along slowly.

1 – soaked in

The city was steeped in charm.

1 – a loud sharp noise

He shirked when he thought he saw a ghost.

1 – to spread without restraint

The sprawling landscape of the desert is one of the best  things to do in Tucson .

1 – fill with things or with satiety

He was stuffed after Thanksgiving dinner.

1 – feeling to do something (usually wrong)

He was tempted to eat the candy.

DESCRIPTIVE WORDS FOR WRITING: LIST OF ADVERBS

1 – Suddenly or Unexpectedly.

The car stopped abruptly.

2 – In a rude manner.

His mom abruptly cut him off.

3 – Steep

The hill ascends abruptly.

Apathetically 

1- Without enthusiasm or interest.

She played with the dog apathetically, barely looking at it. 

ADDITIONALLY

1 – extra factor or circumstance.

brokers finance themselves additionally by short-term borrowing.

2 – used to introduce a new fact or argument.

Additionally, the regulations require a clean environment.

ALTERNATELY

1 – one after the other or next

Alternately, don’t give up when things get hard.

Begrudgingly 

begrudgingly (adverb) – unwillingly; reluctantly 

I begrudgingly gave him my number.

 Deliberately 

1- done or planned with care and intention

The mother deliberately left the child in the car while she went into the store. 

 Dramatically 

1. in a dramatic manner

The actress dramatically read the lines from the script. 

EFFECTIVELY

1 – being effective or in effect

John effectively finished his to-do list before stopping for the day.

1 – evident or provide evidence

He was evidently born in Ohio.

1 – expert in something

He expertly navigated his way through the maze of alleyways.

Extraordinary 

1 – strikingly unusual or different; remarkable

This painting is extraordinary! 

FURTHERMORE

1 – what precedes

Furthermore, people should travel more.

1 – a gloomy or somber

He grimly walked to see his boos.

1 – a sinister character

The dark figure had a grimly stance that shadows seemed to cling to.

Inquisitively 

1- Inquisitively is defined as in a curious or questioning manner. 

Looking inquisitively at someone means looking at them in a way that suggests you want to know more about them. For example, you may be staring intently at their face as if you are trying to read their thoughts. 

Intelligently

1 – In an intelligent way

The mother cat was intelligently trying to get her kitten out from under the car. 

1 – to a great degree

The immensely talented writer self-published his book.

INTENTIONALLY

1 – intentional manner or awareness

He intentionally arrived at the airport early.

1 – intense

He intensely focused on the problem at hand.

IMPULSIVELY

1 – from impulse

He impulsively got up early every morning.

He invitingly offered me a free drink.

INFURIATINGLY

1 – extreme anger

Moving to my wife in Sweden is an infuriatingly slow process.

1 – born or existing in.

He innately loved filling his head with quotes about adventure.

1 – lasting or unforgettable cannot be removed.

The indelibly hued landscape when  backpacking Italy  changed my life.

INTRICATELY

1 – complex with many parts

The intricately designed plot has levels of detail.

1 – eager or intense

They are keenly attuned to your bad behavior.

1 – clear; glassiness

The limpidly rushing water of the cascading waterfall.

LUDICROUSLY

1 – meriting laughter or exaggeration

He ludicrously lost his wallet.

Synonym for Richly or Grandly

1 – marked by excess

The lavishly decorated crown marked him as king.

Methodically 

1 – In a precise and orderly way.

The scientist methodically recorded the data. 

MONUMENTALLY

1 – large, or to an extreme degree

He monumentally failed in his task.

1 – without doubt

The claims were patently false.

1 – peace or tranquility

he peacefully listened to the sounds of birds singing outside his window.

1 – strict

He rigorously worked at his craft every day.

ROMANTICALLY

1 – romantic

He was romantically involved with her.

DESCRIPTIVE WORDS FOR WRITING: NOUNS

1 – the process of absorbing.

The absorption of the spilled water.

2 – The whole occupation of the mind.

The absorption of my work overtakes every other desire.

1 – strong desire to do or to achieve something which takes hard work.

People trying to improve their skills with this list of descriptive words for  writing  have a lot of ambition.

2 – determination to achieve success.

life offers many opportunities for those with ambition.

1 – a large quantity of something.

I have an abundance of ambition.

2 – The condition of having a copious quantity of something; bountifulness.

The vineyard has an abundance of grapes.

1 – a person who is very knowledgeable and enthusiastic about an activity, subject, or pastime.

“He’s a wine aficionado.”

1 – a dark volcanic rock that displays a columnar structure and is made of fine-grained.

The fertile soil was made of decomposed basalt.

1 – something of monstrous size

That’s a behemoth-sized lion.

1 – a person who is socially unconventional in a way regarded as characteristic of creative artists; a bohemian.

The town bohos opened an art gallery.

1 – an increase

A boost in the economy.

1 – a room or pantry used for storing wine or hard liquor.

Can you grab the wine out of the buttery?

1 – a beer that has a strong hop taste; or liquor with the sharp taste of plant extracts.

What bitters do you have on tap?

1 – a combination of qualities of color, such as shape, or form, that pleases the aesthetic senses, especially the sight.

“I was struck by her beauty .”

Synonym  for Rock or Stone

1 – a large rock, mostly worn smooth by years of erosion.

The boulder blocked the path.

1 – move quickly.

He buzzed through these descriptive words.

1 – Irish name for a beehive hut.

The ruins of a clochán sat on the other side of the field.

1 – a written or spoken agreement, especially one concerning employment, sales, or tenancy, that is intended to be enforceable by law.

“both parties must sign employment contracts “

1 – a mass of something that falls or hangs in copious or luxuriant quantities.

“A cascade of pink bougainvillea.”

2 – a large number or amount of something occurring or arriving in rapid succession.

“a cascade of antiwar literature”

1 – an ornamental decoration at the ridge of a roof or top of a wall or screen.

High on the roof was a cresting decoration.

1 – Someone who chips

The chipper was hard at working cutting down the tree.

1 – one delegated by a superior to execute a duty or an office

The commissary was tasked with finding a cure.

1 – a series of loops

The coil of pumps was confusing.

2 – everyday troubles

Sometimes we all need to shrug off the coils of the workday.

1 – any of an order (Coniferales) of mostly evergreen trees and shrubs having usually needle-shaped or scalelike leaves like pine, cones, and arillate fruit.

The group of conifer trees took over the forest.

1 – to create

Christians believe in the creation story.

1 – an agreement or promise / attached to someone or something

I have a commitment to my wife.

1 – a cover carried above by a person of rank / or a cloth suspended

The canopy covered the diners on the patio.

1 – a heap of stones in a heap. Usually a landmark or memorial. Typically on a hilltop or skyline.

The stony cairn marked the way back.

Characteristics

1- Colorful Having many different colors. The sunset was so colorful.

Loyalty is one of his best characteristics

1 – something to eat considered rare and luxurious

What is your favorite delicacy in Italy?

2 – the quality or state of being dainty of someone or something

Spiderwebs have a delicacy.

1 – to flow along

To drift through life is sad.

2 – an underlying meaning or design.

The spy understood the drift of his orders.

1 – dislike food or drink

Many have a distaste for mushrooms.

1 – representation in images or  describing words  depicting something or someone.

The depiction of the movie wasn’t congruent with the book.

1 – a deep place or state of being

The depths of our abilities remain unknown until we push for greatness.

1 – an arrangement, or state of being engaged

Social engagement took most of my day.

1 – a massive structure

The social edifice holds together certain rules.

plural noun

1 – city districts / or surroundings in your space or vicinity

The crystal environs of the waterfalls.

1 – a public showcase

The art exhibition was a success.

1 – a high position of superiority, Commanding or in a profession.

His eminence in the film made him a legend.

1 – refined taste, dignified gracefulness

The novel had an air of elegance and wit.

EXASPERATION

1 – a state of exasperated or exasperating someone/feeling irritation

He was exasperated after working all day.

1 – the act of representing a medium

I don’t understand the expression that artists are trying to achieve.

FOCAL POINT

1 – point of attention.

The focal point of this blog post is  describing words  that help others master descriptive  writing .

1 – an embarrassing mistake or error.

Interpreting someone is considered a social faux pas.

1 – the front of the building

The store’s facade was highly decorated.

1 – a false, or fake appearance

His friends saw through his thinly veiled facade.

A love this descriptive word.

1 – a boisterous and loud burst of laughter.

The joke caused a guffaw in the room.

1 – enthusiastic and filled with joy.

1 – a gloomy or somber outlook

He had a grim disposition on life.

The grim tale left me afraid.

1 – the quality or current state

The grandeur of ancient Rome inspired our world.

1 – grand

Many of the  best places to visit in Europe  are grand in design, scope, and scale.

1 – strong wind

The gust of wind caused the bike to tip over.

1 – an outburst of feeling

He had a gust of energy that came with the good news.

1 – either side of an arch.

The dog loves to have his back haunches scratched.

1 – a great number

A host of ants took over the picnic.

1 – something to indicate

He gave the indication that he was going to travel this summer.

1 – a stage or exception

In this instance, we all need to be quiet.

2 – example

For instance, pasta tastes better in Italy.

1 – inside limits or inner constitution

Travelers loved the lavish interior of the modern-day art gallery.

1 – limestone land or limestone plateau

The karst lands were filled with sinkholes and caverns.

1 – a plant organism made up of alge

Working the lichen spotted lake held a natural charm rarely found.

1 – machine for interlacing

Working the loom is hard and painful.

1 – soil made of silt, sand, and clay.

The loam ground was hard to walk.

LAUNDERETTE

1 – a self-service laundry

The launderette was packed with others.

1 – causing wonder and astonishment

Abu Simbel, in Egypt, is a marvel to behold.

1 – a great number of

This myriad  list  of descriptive words is very helpful – like our list of descriptive words for personality -.

1 – middle of the day

The midday meal made him want a nap.

1 – a single massive stone in a column or obelisk

Monoliths pepper the old landscape.

1 – a single massive stone in a column or obelisk from prehistoric origin.

The Menhir’s of Stonehenge tower over all who stand before it.

METROPOLITAN

1 – one who lives in a metropolis

The metropolitan knew the city backward and forwards.

1 – wealth and Abundance

The opulence of the Blue Mosque makes it one of the  best things to do in Turkey .

1 – of an unusual size

The outsize bed wouldn’t fit.

1 – a dirty slovenly place

Clean up this pigpen of a room.

1 – the quality of excitement or attractive

He was charming and had a large amount of pizzazz.

1 – an earnest entreaty

They plead for another helping of mashed potatoes.

1 – a bar something is hung on

The bird sat on the perch.

1 – a medical instrument for exploring

The doctor used a probe to discover what was wrong.

1 – a person despised or rejected

The thief was treated as a pariah.

1 – chasing after

Our pursuits define our lives.

1 – contradictory phases or conclusions.

Life is full of many a paradox.

1 – state of fear

Don’t panic about your writing . Just learn more descriptive words that will improve your writing.

1 – a close inspection; under a microscope

His paper was under a lot of scrutiny.

1 – riot or commotion

Tumult uprisings are a big part of history.

2 – loud noise

a tumult of noise kept me from sleeping.

1 – tiles

The tiling walls were stunning.

DESCRIPTIVE WORDS FOR WRITING: LIST OF PREPOSITIONS WITH DEFINITION

preposition

1 – surrounded by; in the middle of

He walked amid the rolling hills and lush landscape.

2 – in an atmosphere or against a background of.

Mid accusations of cheating the student were suspended.

DESCRIPTIVE WORDS FOR WRITING: DESCRIPTIVE PHRASES

Here are a lot of describing words that I’ve picked up from various books, and blog posts. I fell in love with this word list. And are great for adding detail.

Pro tip:  The  describing words  are all around you. Listen to how people use descriptive language in your favorite movies, tv shows, and podcast. Try to find describing words in the things you read. The  lesson  you are looking for and the right words are all around you! You just have to look for the lesson to find the best describing word.

ARID STEPPE

1 – one of the vast treeless tracts in Europe and Asia.

The arid steppe of Mongolia is famous around the world.

ATLANTIC SWELLS

1- Waves crashing on the coast.

The Atlantic swells crashed against the crenelated coast.

BROODING SUMMITS

1 – sad terrain, a  phrase to describe  mountain ranges.

The brooding summits, covered in clouds, look like a storm is coming.

BEHIND THE TIMES

1 – not aware of or using the latest ideas or techniques; out of date.

When it came to tech, he was behind the times.

CRYSTALLINE LAKES

1 – a good description to describe a still lake. Or a phrase lake on a nice day.

The crystalline lake boasted the perfect space to camp.

CRUMBLING CASTLES

1 – a castle falling apart.

Ireland’s peppered with crumbling castles.

CRESTING MOUNTAINS

1 – descriptive of a scenic mountain range.

The cresting mountains of New Zealand are unforgettable.

EVER- DEEPENING

1 – getting deeper

The ever-deepening snow made the terrain impassable.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE

The historical significance of Rome echoes even until today.

INFINITE HILLS

The infinite hills of New Zealand lure thousands of visitors a year. This is one of my favorite descriptive phrases.

ICY ROLLERS

1 – cold waves

The icy rollers of the Atlantic Ocean beat along the coast.

INDELIBLY WILD

The indelibly wild forest of Peru.

LUNAR-SCAPED

1 – landscape similar to that on the moon

The Lunar-scaped beaches on Milos, put it high on many travelers’  lists of Greek Islands  to visit.

LONG-FORGOTTEN

The long-forgotten castle has centuries of neglect.

A great  descriptive word  for the forest!

1 – covered by moss

The moss-clad rocks sat along the stream.

MODERN HIGH-RISE SKYSCRAPERS

The hundreds of workers wasted their lives in modern high-rise skyscrapers.

Descriptive Words for Food

1 – having a pleasing smell

1 – having a brittle texture and a dry, brittle sound when broken

Crunchy 

1 – having a brittle texture and a crisp, crackling sound when broken

1 – having a strong, satisfying flavor

1 – having a pleasing, sugary flavor

1 -having a sour, acidic taste

Salty 

1 – having a salty, savory flavor

1 – not having a strong or distinctive flavor

 1 – having a hot, pungent flavor

1 – having a lot of flavors 

1 – something that tastes extremely good 

1- providing the body with essential nutrients 

1 – making someone want to eat something 

Scrumptious

1 – extremely delicious and appetizing 

1 – a sweet liquid produced by flowers and used as a drink or in cooking 

1 – producing an excessive flow of saliva 

1 – of or relating to the sense of taste 

1 – arousing or tempting the appetite 

1 – having an extremely pleasing taste 

1 – delightfully beautiful or elegant 

1 – extremely luxurious and expensive 

Scintillating

1 – brilliantly sparkling 

1 – strikingly unusual or different 

1 – restoring or invigorating 

1 – promoting good health

1 – energetically alive and vigorous 

1 – pleasantly firm and fresh 

1 -full of juice 

1 – having a strong, distinctive taste 

Mouth-watering 

1- so delicious as to make the mouth water 

1 – easily broken or chewed and having a delicate, pleasing texture 

Descriptive Words for Trees

Words to describe trees is one of the most requested updates for this post. So I have updated the list with a bunch of tree descriptive words. I hope you enjoy it! 

  • massive 
  • towering 
  • gigantic 
  • enormous 

Descriptive Words in Spanish

  • ágil – agile
  • bello – beautiful
  • brillante – brilliant
  • cálido – warm
  • claro – clear
  • colorido – colorful
  • cortés – courteous
  • curioso – curious
  • dulce – sweet
  • enérgico – energetic
  • fresco – fresh
  • gentil – gentle
  • inteligente – intelligent
  • joven – young
  • ligero – light
  • lindo – pretty
  • maduro – mature
  • maravilloso – marvelous
  • nervioso – nervous
  • optimista – optimistic
  • pacífico – peaceful
  • perezoso – lazy
  • romántico – romantic
  • sensible – sensible
  • serio – serious
  • simpático – likable
  • triste – sad
  • vibrante – vibrant 

LIST OF DESCRIPTIVE ADJECTIVES

Here are some words to describe the positive qualities of people’s personalities. And using words like this to showcase a  personality  can connect those feeling with your readers.

affectionate – readily feeling or showing fondness or tenderness.

Agile – able to move quickly and easily.

Altruistic – showing a disinterested and selfless concern for the well-being of others; unselfish.

amiable – having or displaying a friendly and pleasant manner.

bright – giving out or reflecting much light; shining. – A very common descriptive phrase.

Bonza – excellent; first-rate.

charming – very pleasant or attractive.

Conscientious – wishing to do one’s work or duty well and thoroughly

imaginative – having or showing creativity or inventiveness.

List of Common Adjectives

These are great for common adjectives that can be used for anything from a descriptive phrase, descriptive writing, or a cover letter. 

compassionate

distinguished

enthusiastic

fashionable

fascinating

independent

influential

intelligent

mesmerizing

WORD LIST OF ATTRIBUTIVE ADJECTIVES

What are attributive adjectives?

These are words to can be placed inside a sentence that can modify a person or a thing. These  different adjective  are only used before nouns.

Example Sentence:  The tender steak made my mouth water.

Heart-stopping

Too-yummy-to-be-believed

Face-to-face vicious

adjective for thick vines

  • coiling, twisting, writhing
  • constricting
  • claustrophobic 

WORD LIST OF MULTIPLE ADJECTIVES

What are multiple adjectives?

Sometimes called paired adjectives. This is using more than one word to describe a noun.

Almost an adjective can be multiple adjectives if it can be paired together with other describing words to describe a noun. The key is to put them in the right order.

But here are some common ones.

Example Sentence:  The thick, dense college application seemed daunting.

Smart, energetic

Small, round

Short, Fast

Pretty Little

WHAT ARE COORDINATE ADJECTIVES

Similar to paired adjectives,  Coordinate adjectives

are two – or maybe even more – adjectives that describe the same noun. They are separated by a common.

LIST OF POSITIVE ADJECTIVES

Positive words are a great way to make your readers feel something about a character, place, or object. Positive words of descriptive are powerful.

Example: He was brave enough to use a new word to showcase his skill in front of the class.

Adventurous

Affectionate

Broadminded

Knowledgeable

Self-confident

Warmhearted

descriptive words starting with m

Magnificent.

impressively beautiful, elaborate or striking

Example: The view from the top of the mountain was simply magnificent.

given to unpredictable changes in mood or feelings

Example: He was in a moody state after his fight with his girlfriend.

Melancholic

feeling or expressing a deep sadness or gloominess

Example: The melancholic music helped me release my emotions.

Mischievous

Playful or causing trouble in a playful way Example: The mischievous child kept on playing pranks on his siblings.

difficult or impossible to understand or explain

Example: The disappearance of the man is still a mysterious case to this day.

having or showing impressive beauty or dignity

Example: The Taj Mahal is a majestic work of art.

having a smooth, rich, or full flavor or personality

Example: The mellow sound of the saxophone helped me relax.

relating to the present or recent times as opposed to the remote past

Example: The modern technology we have today has made life easier.

Magnanimous

generous or forgiving, especially towards a rival or less powerful person

Example: Despite losing the game, he still remained magnanimous and congratulated the winning team.

unassuming or moderate in size, quantity, or importance

Example: She is a modest person who never seeks attention.

Descriptive Words Starting With N

feeling or showing anxiety or worry.

Example: I’m nervous about my upcoming job interview.

having or showing high moral principles or ideals.

Example: He was a noble man who always put others before himself.

making a lot of sound, often in an unpleasant or disruptive way.

Example: The party next door was very noisy and kept us up all night.

existing or occurring as part of nature; not artificial or man-made.

Example: The park was a beautiful natural oasis in the middle of the city.

clean, orderly, and well-organized.

Example: His desk was always so neat and tidy.

pleasingly stylish or clever; neat or attractive.

Example: The nifty new gadget made my life easier.

quick and light in movement or action.

Example: The nimble cat easily caught the mouse.

feeling a sentimental longing for the past, typically for a period or place with happy personal associations.

Example: Looking at old family photos made her feel nostalgic for her childhood.

providing nourishment or food that is essential for health and growth.

Example: The salad was full of nutritious vegetables and healthy fats.

worthy of attention or notice; remarkable.

Example: His notable achievements in the field of science made him a household name.

descriptive words of a leader and Leadership Skills

Here are some great descriptive words that are great for describing effective leaders, passionate leaders, and other leadership qualities.  

Charismatic

Having a compelling charm or appeal that inspires devotion in others.

Example: His charismatic personality made him a great public speaker. And a successful leaders. 

having or showing a powerful imagination and the ability to think about or plan the future with wisdom or foresight.

Example: Steve Jobs was a visionary who revolutionized the technology industry. And held many leadership roles throughout his life. 

Feeling or showing self-assurance; having faith in oneself and one’s abilities.

Example: A confident leader can inspire confidence in others. Which makes him a true leader. 

Settling an issue; producing a definite result.

Example: A decisive leader is able to make tough decisions when necessary.

Having the ability to understand and share the feelings of others.

Example: An empathetic leader is able to connect with and inspire their team. Which makes them effective leaders. 

Relating to the identification of long-term or overall aims and interests and the means of achieving them.

Example: A strategic leader is able to plan and execute successful business strategies.

Inspirational

providing inspiration or motivation to others; uplifting and motivating.

Example: An inspirational leader can inspire their team to achieve great things. And allows him to be a true leader. 

Trustworthy

deserving of trust or confidence; reliable.

Example: A trustworthy leader is one who can be relied upon to keep their promises.

able to withstand or recover quickly from difficult conditions.

Example: A resilient leader is able to bounce back from setbacks and continue to lead effectively.

having or showing a modest or low estimate of one’s importance.

Example: A humble leader is able to put the needs of others ahead of their own and lead with integrity. And a true leader is humble, and it’s a sign of effective leadership. 

MORE ENGLISH GRAMMAR QUESTIONS WERE ANSWERED!

What are the different kinds of adjectives.

There are several kinds of adjectives, including descriptive adjectives, limiting adjectives, proper adjectives, demonstrative adjectives, interrogative adjectives, and distributive adjectives.

Descriptive adjectives describe the qualities of a noun or pronoun, such as “blue,” “soft,” or “happy.”

Limiting adjectives limit the noun or pronoun by indicating a specific quantity or amount, such as “two,” “many,” or “few.”

Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns and describe a particular noun or pronoun, such as “American,” “Italian,” or “Shakespearean.”

Demonstrative adjectives point out or indicate which noun or pronoun is being referred to, such as “this,” “that,” “these,” or “those.”

Interrogative adjectives are used to ask questions and include “which,” “what,” and “whose.”

Distributive adjectives refer to individual members of a group, such as “each,” “every,” “either,” or “neither.”

What are Negative Adjectives?

Negative adjectives are adjectives that describe something negatively, or with a negative connotation. And indicating that it lacks or has the opposite of a positive quality. They can be used talk about a personality trait, character trait, and change your writing style. 

Examples of negative adjectives include “bad,” “ugly,” “harmful,” “horrible,” “unpleasant,” “unfortunate,” “unfriendly,” “unhappy,” “displeasing,” “unfair,” and “unsatisfactory.”

These adjectives can be used to express criticism, disapproval, or disappointment towards someone or something. Negative adjectives can also be used to contrast one thing with another, such as in phrases like “less beautiful,” “not as smart,” or “less effective.”

positive personality adjectives

  • Affable – friendly, easy-going and pleasant to talk to
  • Ambitious – determined to succeed and reach goals
  • Assertive – confident and self-assured; able to stand up for oneself and one’s beliefs
  • Authentic – genuine and true to oneself; not fake or artificial
  • Benevolent – kind, caring and generous, with a desire to do good for others
  • Brave – courageous, not afraid to face challenges or danger
  • Charismatic – possessing a compelling charm or appeal that inspires devotion in others
  • Compassionate – empathetic, caring and understanding towards others who are suffering
  • Confident – having faith in oneself and one’s abilities; self-assured
  • Creative – imaginative, original and innovative
  • Diplomatic – able to handle delicate or difficult situations with tact and sensitivity
  • Empathetic – having the ability to understand and share the feelings of others
  • Enthusiastic – passionate, energetic and eager to do things
  • Gracious – courteous, kind and polite
  • Honest – truthful and sincere; not deceptive or deceitful
  • Humorous – having a sense of humor and able to make others laugh
  • Independent – self-sufficient and able to take care of oneself
  • Intuitive – able to understand or know something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning
  • Optimistic – hopeful and positive, expecting good outcomes and opportunities
  • Passionate – having strong emotions and intense feelings towards something or someone.

WHAT IS A PRESENT PARTICIPLE?

A word formed from a verb that ends in ing.

Sentence: He couldn’t stop laughing.

What is a Pronoun?

Pronouns are words that replace a noun.

A word formed from a verb that ends in  ing.

Sentence: He couldn’t stop  laughing.

What is a Collective Noun?

A collective noun is a word that refers to a group of things or animals as a single unit. Some common collective nouns are flock, herd, pack, and swarm. 

What is a Prepositional Phrase?

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or a pronoun. The preposition shows the relationship between the noun or pronoun and the verb. 

 What are Some Popular Synonyms?

Some popular synonyms are beautiful, pretty, handsome, and stunning. 

What are Transition Words

Transition words are used to connect ideas, show relationships between ideas, and indicate the logic of thought or argument. They are used to signal the start and end of paragraphs, introduce new paragraphs, and connect related thoughts within a paragraph. 

There we go! Over 500 descriptive words that will help you improve your writing! This list is always being updated as I find new  describing words  I like through reading and writing. Becoming a good writer and increasing your  skill , and learning  a new word  is an endless quest. These are great words that can improve your follow-up comments or inline feedback on your writing.

And I hope that you found the list of adjectives, nouns, descriptive phrases, and verbs useful. And helps you get a little better and expand your  vocabulary.

Check back for new  descriptive words  monthly!

Make It Fun: Teach Adjectives Using These 9 Creative Writing Ideas

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Strengthen Your Creative Writing with Extraordinary Adverbs

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Writing styles ebb and flow and come and go. Currently, there is an all-out assault on adverbs.

Somehow, they’ve become a sign of unsophisticated writing. But the truth is, when you use them properly, they can crank up the quality of your work. Therefore, our team at Next Chapters thought it was essential to address the misconceptions around adverbs by answering some of your most frequently asked questions.

What is an Adverb?

Adverbs are words or phrases that modify or qualify an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group. In general, they express a relation of:

There are also conjunctive/linking adverbs that connect one clause to another. By doing so, they can show specific relationships between clauses, such as sequence, contrast, and cause and effect.

What Are Some Examples of Adverbs?

Let’s highlight a few adverb examples in sentences.

We’ve bolded the adverbs in the sentences below:

  • No matter how many times I listen to “Let It Be,” I’ll always love it.
  • She’s the only one who knows the password to the safe.
  • I gently placed the old vase back on the shelf.
  • I hid a note between two books in the library.
  • Dinner will be ready soon .
  • Naturally , John thought he was great at everything.

How can Adverbs Help to Foster Your Unique Writing Style?

Adverbs provide a great way to emphasize a particular point, emphasis certain verbs or adjectives, and add an extra layer of meaning and flair to your work. You can also use adverbs to create a sense of rhythm in your writing and evoke an emotion or atmosphere. By using adverbs in your writing, you can create a distinctive and memorable style that your readers will recognize.

What Are the Three Main Adverb Positions?

Depending on the adverb, you can include them at the beginning (front), middle (mid), or end of a sentence. People refer to these spots in the clause as “positions.”

  • Suddenly I felt a hunger pang like a lightning bolt.
  • Therefore , the real problem is plastic water bottles.
  • Homemade cooking always tastes better than fast food.
  • She quietly hummed a tune to herself.
  • I’ll be home soon .
  • You have to stop coming in so late .

While there are numerous exceptions to the following positions, this chart will give you a general sense of where each kind of adverb goes in a sentence.

How Can I Use Adverbs to Create Powerful Imagery?

Adverbs can help you paint a picture in the reader’s mind. They add detail to a sentence that shows the scene, character, or action more clearly.

For example: She ran quickly across the field.

The adverb “quickly” conveys the speed of her movements better than “She ran across the field.”

You can also use adverbs to express the intensity or mood of the action.

For example: “He shouted angrily.”

Through the use of this adverb, the reader knows the mood of the character. By combining adverbs with other descriptive language, writers can create more vivid and evocative images.

What Are Some Creative Ways To Use Adverbs In A Narrative?

Adverbs can be a great way to add color and detail to any narrative. Here are some creative ways to use adverbs:

  • Use adverbs to describe the actions of your characters. For example, instead of saying, “he walked,” you could say, “he slowly sauntered” or “he eagerly scurried.” Using adverbs can help create vivid images in your readers’ minds and bring your story to life.
  • Use adverbs to describe the setting. Instead of simply describing a place as “dark,” you could say “ominously dark” or “hauntingly dark.” Doing so will help create an atmosphere and mood for your narrative.
  • Use adverbs to describe the emotions of your characters. For example, you could say, “She angrily slammed the door” or “She sadly sighed.” Adverbs can help your readers connect with the characters.

What Are The Differences Between Adjectives And Adverbs In Creative Writing?

Adjectives and adverbs are essential parts of creative writing but have different functions. Adjectives describe nouns, helping readers better understand the people, places, and things in the story.

Adverbs, on the other hand, describe verbs and are used to add more detail to the action in a scene. They can also provide context for the readers and give them insight into the feelings or emotions of the characters.

#1 Best Practice: Use Adverbs Sparingly

You’ll frequently hear authors, teachers, and other writing experts say that people only use adverbs when they haven’t found a strong enough verb. While in some instances, this expert advice is correct. But sometimes, it’s the detail of the adverb that truly sets the scene and immerses the reader.

That being said, the overall goal should be to use adverbs sparingly. Find and use strong verbs, and when there isn’t one that you think works in your writing, try adding an adverb for additional context.

Any Other Pointers?

Adverbs can be powerful tools for adding detail and texture to creative writing. Here are some tips for effectively incorporating adverbs into your writing:

  • Vary the types of adverbs you use: There are many different categories of adverbs. Make sure you’re taking advantage of this variety to ensure your work doesn’t feel repetitive.
  • Look for opportunities to use an action verb instead of an adverb: Action verbs can often convey the same meaning as an adverb and are often more evocative. For example, instead of saying, “I quickly ran upstairs,” you could say, “I sprinted upstairs.”
  • Place adverbs strategically in your writing: Consider where you place adverbs in a sentence. Placing them at the end of a sentence or clause can add emphasis and draw attention to the adverb.
  • Use them in dialogue: We speak much differently than we write. It’s one of the reasons it’s so hard to write good dialogue. Adverbs can add a certain level of “realness” to your dialogue, as we use them regularly in everyday speech.

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Powerful Verbs for Your Writing

Inventory Your Own Verbs for Powerful Writing

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Verbs are action words, right? We all remember that from elementary school. Verbs describe the action that is taking place.

But verbs don't have to surrender all the fun and emotional power to adjectives —the words that traditionally paint the pictures in our heads. As a matter of fact, the most powerful writers use verbs quite effectively to illustrate their writing.

Review Your Verbs

After you complete a draft of your paper, it might be a good idea to conduct a verb inventory. Just read over your draft and underline all your verbs. Do you see repetition? Are you bored?

Verbs like said, walked, looked, and thought can be replaced with more descriptive words like mumbled, sauntered, eyeballed, and pondered . Here are a few more suggestions:

  • severed (with his eyes)

Get Creative With Verbs

One way to make verbs more interesting is to invent them from other word forms. Sounds illegal, doesn't it? But it's not like you're printing dollar bills in your basement.

One type of noun that works well is animal types, since some animals have very strong characteristics. Skunks, for instance, have a reputation for being stinky or spoiling the air.

Do the following statements evoke powerful images?

  • He skunked the party up with his cologne... She snaked the hallways... She wormed her way out of the class...

Jobs as Verbs

Another noun type that works well is names of occupations. We often use doctor as a verb, as in the following sentence:

  • She doctored the paper until it was perfect.

Doesn't that evoke the image of a woman hovering over a piece of writing, tools in hand, crafting and nurturing the paper to perfection? What other occupations could paint such a clear scene? How about police ?

  • Mrs. Parsons policed her garden until it was completely pest free.

You can get very creative with unusual verbs:

  • bubble-wrapped the insult (to suggest that the insult was surrounded by "softer" words)
  • tabled your idea

But you do have to use colorful verbs tactfully. Use good judgment and don't overdo the creativity. Language is like clothing--too much color can be just plain odd.

List of Power Verbs

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  • Project: How to Make Your Own French Vocabulary Flash Cards

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adjectives in creative writing

Examples of adjectives from top authors’ novels

Adjectives – words that describe nouns or pronouns – add specificity and detail to writing. The literal definition of adjective is ‘throw towards’, from the Latin prefix ad- (towards) and the verb jacere (throw). That’s what great describing words do: They ‘throw’ readers into your fictional world; let them see, hear, taste it. Read adjective examples from works by esteemed authors that show how to be creative with your descriptions:

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Read examples of adjectives from top authors' novels | Now Novel

Adjectives – words that describe nouns or pronouns – add specificity and detail to writing. The literal definition of adjective is ‘throw towards’, from the Latin prefix ad- (towards) and the verb jacere  (throw). That’s what great describing words do: They ‘throw’ readers into your fictional world; let them see, hear, taste it. Read adjective examples from works by esteemed authors that show how to be creative with your descriptions :

1. Reveal characters with strong describing words: Charles Dickens

The Victorian author Charles Dickens is a master of creating vivid, characterful protagonists, villains and supporting characters. When we first meet the sister of the narrator and hero Pip in Great Expectations  (1861), the character Mrs Joe, this is how Dickens describes her:

‘My sister, Mrs. Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap. She was tall and bony, and almost always wore a coarse apron, fastened over her figure behind two loops, and having a square impregnable bib in front, that was stuck full of pins and needles. She made it a powerful merit in herself, and a strong reproach against [her husband] Joe, that she wore this apron so much.’ (p. 8)

Dickens’ use of adjectives is masterful. Note that he doesn’t just fixate on the colours of Mrs Joe’s features, as an amateur writer might. She does have ‘black’ hair and eyes. From here the description immediately gets more interesting. Dickens could simply describe Mrs’s Joe’s ‘red skin’. The phrase ‘redness of skin’ instead uses a ‘noun + preposition + noun’ construction. This is grammar we use to express a vague measurable quantity (e.g. ‘a cup of tea’ or ‘strand of hair’). The effect (combined with Pip wondering if she uses a nutmeg-grater to wash) is comical.

Dickens returns to simple adjectives when he describes Mrs Joe’s physique (‘tall and bony’). He then describes an item of her clothing in detail to convey Mrs Joe’s character.

Her apron is ‘coarse’, but the word ‘impregnable’ is genius. It’s clever because on one hand, it suggests toughness, in the meaning ‘unable to be pierced.’ The always-worn apron is like a suit of armour for stern Mrs Joe. It also has the dual meaning of ‘inability to conceive or fall pregnant’, suggesting the absence of maternal attributes.

Similarly, when you choose adjectives to describe your characters:

  • Don’t just describe eye colour: What do characters’ complexions, clothing, posture and other details say about them? The irritated redness of Mrs Joe’s skin tone and her fort-like apron suggest an irritable, tough nature, as Dickens proceeds to show
  • Describe clothing details so they reinforce characters’ personalities. For example, the reproachful, long-suffering way Mrs Joe wears her apron

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2. Describe places clearly: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

The Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez has a skill for rich description, even read in translation. In this description of Dr. Urbino’s library from Love in the time of Cholera  (1985), notice how Marquez mixes simple adjectives with characters’ superstitions and actions to show how his characters live in time and place:

‘Unlike the other rooms, which were at the mercy of noise and foul winds from the port, the library always enjoyed the tranquility and fragrance of an abbey. Born and raised in the Carribean superstition that one opened doors and windows to summon a coolness that in fact did not exist, Dr. Urbino and his wife at first felt their hearts oppressed by enclosure. But in the end they were convinced of the merits of the Roman strategy against heat, which consists of closing houses during the lethargy of August in order to keep out the burning air from the street, and then opening them up completely to the night breezes.’ (p. 19)

Marquez evokes sound and smell (the ‘noise’ and ‘foul’ winds from the port). He uses the ‘noun + of + noun’ construction we read in Mrs Joe’s ‘redness of skin’ to describe the library’s smell that resembles a place of worship. The same goes for the ‘lethargy of August’. Marquez then uses simple adjectives again to describe times of day – the day’s ‘burning’ air and the ‘night’ breezes.

Thus while Marquez uses simple adjectives to describe the elements (‘foul winds’ and ‘night breezes’), he also uses more complex descriptions. Like Dickens he uses nouns modifying nouns (‘lethargy of August’) to describe in more general, abstract terms. These descriptions show everything from times of year to comparisons between the Urbinos’ private library and a place of worship.

To choose good adjectives to describe places:

  • Describe to involve different senses: Sight, sound, smell, touch
  • Use other describing words (such as noun modifiers). For example, you can use a noun with a modifying phrase to describe a character’s face: ‘He had a face for radio’ (here ‘for radio’ implies the character isn’t good-looking, since radio is sound-only).
  • You can describe places through actions, too: Marquez shows us how his characters live in their home at different times of year and day

3. Combine adjectives creatively: Toni Morrison

Examples of adjectives, taken individually, don’t always tell us much. A single describing word may be apt, but it’s how an author strings together descriptions that creates a memorable effect. Take this example from Toni Morrison’s novel Jazz (1992), where she describes lovers Joe (a make-up salesman) and Dorcas:

‘The Iroquois sky passes the windows, and if they do see it, it crayon-colors their love. That would be when, after a decent silence, he would lift his sample case of Cleopatra from the chair and tease her before opening it, holding up the lid so she could not see right away what he has hidden under the jars and perfume-sweet boxes; the present he has brought for her. That is the little bow that ties up their day at the same time the citysky is changing its orange heart to black in order to hide its stars for the longest time before passing them out one by one by one, like gifts.’ (p. 38)

Morrison chooses an interesting adjective to describe the sky, referring to the Iroquois indigenous people of North America (perhaps referencing the purple of their flag, or the important role of the sky in their mythology).

Morrison’s description of Joe’s travelling case is evocative. She describes ‘perfume-sweet’ boxes, creating a hyphenated, portmanteau adjective. Instead of describing the sky as simply turning from orange to black, she personifies the sky – it actively changes its ‘orange heart to black in order to hide its stars’. The sky itself mimics the hiding and revealing of Joe and his box of gifts, similarly waiting for the perfect moment for a dazzling reveal. This description is rich and poetic.

  • Creating your own compound adjectives (e.g. ‘a whiskey-strong kick’; ‘ her shutter-fast retort’). Elsewhere in Jazz , Morrison describes the character Violet’s ‘snatch-gossip tongue’
  • Finding varied, metaphorical ways to use adjectives (instead of ‘the orange sky turned black’; for example, ‘the sky turned its orange heart black’)

Mary Oliver quote on adjectives | Now Novel

4. Craft effective adjectival phrases: E. Annie Proulx

In addition to choosing the right standalone adjectives to describe your characters (like Dicken’s ‘impregnable’ for Mrs Joe’s armour-like apron), it’s also important to use adjectival phrases well. An adjectival phras e (also called adjective phrase) is a group of words that describe a noun or pronoun in a sentence. For example, in the sentence ‘not until dark, frost-slicked morning did she discover what had happened’, ‘dark, frost-slicked’ is a phrase describing ‘morning’.

An adjectival phrase can come before the noun in the sentence, as in this example from E. Annie Proulx’s The Shipping News  (1993):

‘A great damp loaf of a body.’ (p. 2)

This is Proulx’s description of her protagonist Quoyle’s body. The describing words in an adjectival phrase can also come before and after the noun  (e.g. ‘His damp  body, a great,  soggy  loaf’) or before it, as in this example:

‘The were friends for a while, Quoyle, Partridge and Mercalia. Their differences: Partridge black, small, a restless traveler across the slope of life, an all-night talker; Mercalia, second wife of Partridge and the color of a brown feather on dark water, a hot intelligence; Quoyle large, white, stumbling along, going nowhere.’ (p.4)

In longer adjectival phrases such as these, note how the author maintains clarty and structure. At the start of each sentence after the colon, Proulx uses each character’s name, followed by adjectives and adjectival phrases.

  • When stringing together adjectives and adjectival phrases, order your descriptions for good flow. Proulx in the example above moves from the simple and clear (e.g. ‘black, small’) to the longer and more complex (‘all-night talker’) description. Each phrase is easy to follow
  • Combine the simple and visual with the more complex and abstract (e.g. Mercalia is described as having ‘a hot intelligence’)

Improve your descriptions: Get constructive feedback on your use of adjectives and other details and get help to finish writing a novel now .

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adjectives in creative writing

Jordan is a writer, editor, community manager and product developer. He received his BA Honours in English Literature and his undergraduate in English Literature and Music from the University of Cape Town.

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20+ Best Words to Describe Creativity, Adjectives for Creativity

Creativity, in its simplest form, refers to the ability to generate unique ideas and solutions. It is the spark that ignites innovation and drives human progress. When we delve into the realm of creativity, we discover a vast array of words that beautifully encapsulate its essence. Words like imaginative, inventive, original, resourceful, and visionary come to mind. Each of these terms paints a vivid picture of the boundless imagination and limitless potential that creativity holds. In this blog post, we will explore these words and delve deeper into the multifaceted nature of creativity.

Table of Contents

Adjectives for Creativity

Here are the 20 Most Popular adjectives for creativity:

  • Adventurous
  • Imaginative
  • Resourceful
  • Risk-taking
  • Thought-provoking
  • Unconventional

Adjectives for a creative person:

Adjectives for creative thinking:.

  • Outside-the-box
  • Open-minded
  • Problem-solving

Adjectives for a creative writer:

  • Captivating

Adjectives for a creative director:

  • Collaborative

Words to Describe Creativity with Meanings

  • Adventurous : Willing to take creative risks.
  • Artistic : Having skill in creating visual or performing arts.
  • Bold : Fearlessly innovative and daring.
  • Curious : Eager to explore new ideas.
  • Daring : Courageously inventive and unconventional.
  • Expressive : Capable of conveying emotions through art.
  • Imaginative : Having a rich and inventive imagination.
  • Innovative : Introducing original and groundbreaking ideas.
  • Inspiring : Provoking creativity and motivation in others.
  • Inventive : Skilled in devising unique solutions.
  • Original : Fresh and distinctive in creative expression.
  • Playful : Approaching creativity with a lighthearted and fun mindset.
  • Resourceful : Skillful in finding creative solutions.
  • Risk-taking : Willing to embrace calculated creative risks.
  • Talented : Naturally gifted in creative endeavors.
  • Thought-provoking : Stimulating deep thinking and reflection.
  • Unconventional : Deviating from traditional norms and methods.
  • Unique : One-of-a-kind and distinctively original.
  • Visionary : Possessing foresight and innovative ideas.
  • Versatile : Adaptable and capable of diverse creative expressions.

Example Sentences for Creativity Adjectives

  • She embarked on an adventurous artistic journey.
  • The bold concept captured everyone’s attention.
  • His curious nature led him to explore uncharted territories.
  • The daring design pushed the boundaries of creativity.
  • Her expressive artwork evoked powerful emotions in viewers.
  • The imaginative story transported readers to a magical realm.
  • The company’s innovative approach revolutionized the industry.
  • The speech was inspiring and motivated others to pursue their dreams.
  • Her inventive solution solved the problem effectively.
  • The band’s original sound attracted a loyal fanbase.
  • The playful artwork brought joy and laughter to onlookers.
  • He demonstrated resourceful thinking in finding a solution.
  • Taking risk-taking decisions led to great creative breakthroughs.
  • The gallery showcased works by talented artists from around the world.
  • The film left a thought-provoking impact on the audience.
  • The artist’s unconventional approach challenged traditional norms.
  • Her style was unique , unlike anything seen before.
  • The CEO’s visionary ideas shaped the company’s success.
  • The versatile actor effortlessly portrayed a range of characters.

Explore More Words:

Words to Describe Dream

Words to Describe Love

Words to Describe a Veterans

Adjectives for Diversity

How to describe creativity in writing?

Creativity in writing can be described as the ability to think imaginatively, produce original ideas, and express them in a unique and captivating manner.

What kind of adjective is creative?

“Creative” is an adjective that describes someone or something that demonstrates the ability to think innovatively, generate unique ideas, and produce original works of art, literature, or other forms of expression.

What is a creative thinker person?

A creative thinker person is someone who possesses the ability to approach problems and challenges with originality, think outside the box, and generate innovative solutions by leveraging their imagination and unconventional thought processes.

Adjectives for Creativity

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Hi, I'm USMI, engdic.org's Author & Lifestyle Linguist. My decade-long journey in language and lifestyle curation fuels my passion for weaving words into everyday life. Join me in exploring the dynamic interplay between English and our diverse lifestyles. Dive into my latest insights, where language enriches every aspect of living.

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  2. How to Use Adjectives and Adverbs in Creative Writing

    How to Use Adjectives and Adverbs in Creative Writing — The Narrative ARC Conquer NaNoWriMo! Take the 30-Day Creative Writing Challenge. Adjectives and adverbs are controversial in creative writing. How to use adjectives and adverbs effectively.

  3. Descriptive Adjectives for Creative Writing

    Below are lists of descriptive adjectives you can use for your creative writing. Take a class in turning your creative writing ideas into pages. Top courses in English Language Building Your English Brain Luke Priddy 4.6 (21,191) English For IT Professionals 2.0 Lilly Balaban, Olga Tomilova 4.6 (207)

  4. 400 Descriptive Words List To Make Your Writing Shine

    Most common type of descriptive words are adjectives Adjectives are the most common type of descriptive words, so first we will look at these. These words describe features like shape, texture, color, and size. They help differentiate between items in a group by calling out distinguishing features.

  5. Writing Enhancement: Astounding Adjectives

    A vocabulary list featuring Writing Enhancement: Astounding Adjectives. A list of more than 300 alluring adjectives to enhance both your writing skills and comprehension. While the words progress from simple to sophisticated, always remember that any and all adjectives offer value in a piece of writing!

  6. 135+ List of Adjective Words To Add To Your Writing

    135+ List of Adjective Words To Add To Your Writing November 6, 2023 / 9 minutes of reading Here is a list of adjective words that you can add to your writing projects. Adjectives play a vital role in forming clear and vivid sentences. They are critical to describing things, events, people, and feelings.

  7. Strong Adjectives to Show Creative Writing

    For example: Very short → Succinct, Terse Very long → Lengthy, Extensive They often paint a strong example of a noun they are describing. They can help make a sentence more potent or describe a character in greater detail. Writers use strong adjectives in all sorts of creative works, from books to poems.

  8. Creative Writing 101: Everything You Need to Get Started

    Creative writing is writing meant to evoke emotion in a reader by communicating a theme. In storytelling (including literature, movies, graphic novels, creative nonfiction, and many video games), the theme is the central meaning the work communicates. Take the movie (and the novel upon which it's based) Jaws, for instance.

  9. 200+ Descriptive Adjectives and Their Definitions

    This list of descriptive adjectives includes many of the common, as well as some less common, adjectives used in creative writing, and they can be used in all types of writing. The following list is organized alphabetically with the definitions listed first and the common uses for each adjective afterward.

  10. Tips on How to Use Adjectives Effectively in Fiction

    Adjectives are like swear words. The more you use them the less impact they have. Is there a rule of thumb for how often we should use adjectives in a piece of writing? The unhelpful answer is: not really. But let's think about swearing again.

  11. Adding Adjectives to Make Your Writing More Descriptive

    Adjectives add information about number, color, type, and other qualities about the nouns and pronouns in your sentences. Adjectives help your reader get a fuller picture of the things you are writing about. Where do you find adjectives? In the adjective aisle of the supermarket. Okay, you don't.

  12. Awesome Adjectives List

    Adjectives are words that describe nouns. When you write with interesting adjectives, you help your reader know more about how your characters and your setting look, feel, smell, taste, and sound. Better adjectives create a story with more vivid and precise detail. For example, your character could have blue eyes.

  13. 60 Literary Devices and Terms Every Writer Should Know

    11. Litotes. Litotes (pronounced lie-toe-teez) is the signature literary device of the double negative. Writers use litotes to express certain sentiments through their opposites, by saying that that opposite is not the case. Don't worry, it makes more sense with the examples. 😉.

  14. A list of adjectives for your writing needs

    There are two main categories of words you'll find on a list of adjectives: Descriptive words and limiting words. Each has its own adjective list subcategories. Here's an overview of what is covered in this guide: A Descriptive Adjectives List Attributive and Predicate Words A Limiting Adjectives List Cardinal Adjective List

  15. 500 Descriptive Words To Improve Your Writing

    1 - without purpose or direction. "Don't live an aimless life." BRAVE 1 - To face or endure danger or pain; showing courage. The brave healthcare workers are putting their life on the line. BEWILDERED 1 - perplexed and confused; very puzzled. "I had a bewildered look on my face" BRIGHT 1 - giving out or reflecting a lot of light; shining.

  16. Make It Fun: Teach Adjectives Using These 9 Creative Writing Ideas

    Adjectives are just one area of vocabulary that can benefit from writing creatively. Many students may claim that they don't know where to start with creative writing but giving clear instructions and suggested themes will start the ball rolling.

  17. Writing Fun

    In this one time, 30 minute class, I will explain the importance of using different adjectives to clearly express specific meaning while writing (# creative) Nancy Gilbert Average rating: 5.0 Number of reviews: ( 307 )

  18. Don't Use Adverbs and Adjectives to Prettify Your Prose

    Learn how adjectives and adverbs create redundancy and promote lazy writing, and see how you can make your writing direct, vivid, and descriptive without making your readers want to get rid of your book. William Noble Aug 21, 2008

  19. Strengthen Your Creative Writing with Extraordinary Adverbs

    Adverbs are words or phrases that modify or qualify an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group. In general, they express a relation of: Degree Focus Frequency Manner Place Time There are also conjunctive/linking adverbs that connect one clause to another.

  20. How to Use Powerful and Creative Verbs

    Mrs. Parsons policed her garden until it was completely pest free. You can get very creative with unusual verbs: bubble-wrapped the insult (to suggest that the insult was surrounded by "softer" words) tabled your idea. But you do have to use colorful verbs tactfully. Use good judgment and don't overdo the creativity.

  21. Examples of Adjectives from Top Authors' Novels

    Read adjective examples from works by esteemed authors that show how to be creative with your descriptions: 1. Reveal characters with strong describing words: Charles Dickens. The Victorian author Charles Dickens is a master of creating vivid, characterful protagonists, villains and supporting characters.

  22. The BIGGEST killer of CREATIVE WRITING

    The BIGGEST killer of CREATIVE WRITING - the OVERUSE of Adjectives Raewyn (Aiyshah) Gwilliam CEO, Founder and Author Published Jan 2, 2017 + Follow (Photo credit: http://bit.ly/1Xziben) "The...

  23. 20+ Best Words to Describe Creativity, Adjectives for Creativity

    Here are the 20 Most Popular adjectives for creativity: Adventurous Artistic Bold Curious Daring Expressive Imaginative Innovative Inspiring Inventive Original Playful Resourceful Risk-taking Talented Thought-provoking Unconventional Unique Visionary Versatile Adjectives for a creative person: Imaginative Innovative Resourceful Visionary Inventive

  24. What To Know About Earning A Creative Writing Degree

    A creative writing degree teaches you the techniques behind many writing projects, including fiction, nonfiction, screenplays, biographies and poems. A bachelor's degree in creative writing ...