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How to write a speech that your audience remembers

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Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . 

But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech. With the proper preparation and a clear outline, apprehensive public speakers and natural wordsmiths alike can write and present a compelling message. Here’s how to write a good speech you’ll be proud to deliver.

What is good speech writing?

Good speech writing is the art of crafting words and ideas into a compelling, coherent, and memorable message that resonates with the audience. Here are some key elements of great speech writing:

  • It begins with clearly understanding the speech's purpose and the audience it seeks to engage. 
  • A well-written speech clearly conveys its central message, ensuring that the audience understands and retains the key points. 
  • It is structured thoughtfully, with a captivating opening, a well-organized body, and a conclusion that reinforces the main message. 
  • Good speech writing embraces the power of engaging content, weaving in stories, examples, and relatable anecdotes to connect with the audience on both intellectual and emotional levels. 

Ultimately, it is the combination of these elements, along with the authenticity and delivery of the speaker , that transforms words on a page into a powerful and impactful spoken narrative.

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What makes a good speech?

A great speech includes several key qualities, but three fundamental elements make a speech truly effective:

Clarity and purpose

Remembering the audience, cohesive structure.

While other important factors make a speech a home run, these three elements are essential for writing an effective speech.

The main elements of a good speech

The main elements of a speech typically include:

  • Introduction: The introduction sets the stage for your speech and grabs the audience's attention. It should include a hook or attention-grabbing opening, introduce the topic, and provide an overview of what will be covered.
  • Opening/captivating statement: This is a strong statement that immediately engages the audience and creates curiosity about the speech topics.
  • Thesis statement/central idea: The thesis statement or central idea is a concise statement that summarizes the main point or argument of your speech. It serves as a roadmap for the audience to understand what your speech is about.
  • Body: The body of the speech is where you elaborate on your main points or arguments. Each point is typically supported by evidence, examples, statistics, or anecdotes. The body should be organized logically and coherently, with smooth transitions between the main points.
  • Supporting evidence: This includes facts, data, research findings, expert opinions, or personal stories that support and strengthen your main points. Well-chosen and credible evidence enhances the persuasive power of your speech.
  • Transitions: Transitions are phrases or statements that connect different parts of your speech, guiding the audience from one idea to the next. Effective transitions signal the shifts in topics or ideas and help maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.
  • Counterarguments and rebuttals (if applicable): If your speech involves addressing opposing viewpoints or counterarguments, you should acknowledge and address them. Presenting counterarguments makes your speech more persuasive and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion is the final part of your speech and should bring your message to a satisfying close. Summarize your main points, restate your thesis statement, and leave the audience with a memorable closing thought or call to action.
  • Closing statement: This is the final statement that leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the main message of your speech. It can be a call to action, a thought-provoking question, a powerful quote, or a memorable anecdote.
  • Delivery and presentation: How you deliver your speech is also an essential element to consider. Pay attention to your tone, body language, eye contact , voice modulation, and timing. Practice and rehearse your speech, and try using the 7-38-55 rule to ensure confident and effective delivery.

While the order and emphasis of these elements may vary depending on the type of speech and audience, these elements provide a framework for organizing and delivering a successful speech.

Man-holding-microphone-at-panel-while-talking--how-to-give-a-speech

How to structure a good speech

You know what message you want to transmit, who you’re delivering it to, and even how you want to say it. But you need to know how to start, develop, and close a speech before writing it. 

Think of a speech like an essay. It should have an introduction, conclusion, and body sections in between. This places ideas in a logical order that the audience can better understand and follow them. Learning how to make a speech with an outline gives your storytelling the scaffolding it needs to get its point across.

Here’s a general speech structure to guide your writing process:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

How to write a compelling speech opener

Some research shows that engaged audiences pay attention for only 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Other estimates are even lower, citing that people stop listening intently in fewer than 10 minutes . If you make a good first impression at the beginning of your speech, you have a better chance of interesting your audience through the middle when attention spans fade. 

Implementing the INTRO model can help grab and keep your audience’s attention as soon as you start speaking. This acronym stands for interest, need, timing, roadmap, and objectives, and it represents the key points you should hit in an opening. 

Here’s what to include for each of these points: 

  • Interest : Introduce yourself or your topic concisely and speak with confidence . Write a compelling opening statement using relevant data or an anecdote that the audience can relate to.
  • Needs : The audience is listening to you because they have something to learn. If you’re pitching a new app idea to a panel of investors, those potential partners want to discover more about your product and what they can earn from it. Read the room and gently remind them of the purpose of your speech. 
  • Timing : When appropriate, let your audience know how long you’ll speak. This lets listeners set expectations and keep tabs on their own attention span. If a weary audience member knows you’ll talk for 40 minutes, they can better manage their energy as that time goes on. 
  • Routemap : Give a brief overview of the three main points you’ll cover in your speech. If an audience member’s attention starts to drop off and they miss a few sentences, they can more easily get their bearings if they know the general outline of the presentation.
  • Objectives : Tell the audience what you hope to achieve, encouraging them to listen to the end for the payout. 

Writing the middle of a speech

The body of your speech is the most information-dense section. Facts, visual aids, PowerPoints — all this information meets an audience with a waning attention span. Sticking to the speech structure gives your message focus and keeps you from going off track, making everything you say as useful as possible.

Limit the middle of your speech to three points, and support them with no more than three explanations. Following this model organizes your thoughts and prevents you from offering more information than the audience can retain. 

Using this section of the speech to make your presentation interactive can add interest and engage your audience. Try including a video or demonstration to break the monotony. A quick poll or survey also keeps the audience on their toes. 

Wrapping the speech up

To you, restating your points at the end can feel repetitive and dull. You’ve practiced countless times and heard it all before. But repetition aids memory and learning , helping your audience retain what you’ve told them. Use your speech’s conclusion to summarize the main points with a few short sentences.

Try to end on a memorable note, like posing a motivational quote or a thoughtful question the audience can contemplate once they leave. In proposal or pitch-style speeches, consider landing on a call to action (CTA) that invites your audience to take the next step.

People-clapping-after-coworker-gave-a-speech-how-to-give-a-speech

How to write a good speech

If public speaking gives you the jitters, you’re not alone. Roughly 80% of the population feels nervous before giving a speech, and another 10% percent experiences intense anxiety and sometimes even panic. 

The fear of failure can cause procrastination and can cause you to put off your speechwriting process until the last minute. Finding the right words takes time and preparation, and if you’re already feeling nervous, starting from a blank page might seem even harder.

But putting in the effort despite your stress is worth it. Presenting a speech you worked hard on fosters authenticity and connects you to the subject matter, which can help your audience understand your points better. Human connection is all about honesty and vulnerability, and if you want to connect to the people you’re speaking to, they should see that in you.

1. Identify your objectives and target audience

Before diving into the writing process, find healthy coping strategies to help you stop worrying . Then you can define your speech’s purpose, think about your target audience, and start identifying your objectives. Here are some questions to ask yourself and ground your thinking : 

  • What purpose do I want my speech to achieve? 
  • What would it mean to me if I achieved the speech’s purpose?
  • What audience am I writing for? 
  • What do I know about my audience? 
  • What values do I want to transmit? 
  • If the audience remembers one take-home message, what should it be? 
  • What do I want my audience to feel, think, or do after I finish speaking? 
  • What parts of my message could be confusing and require further explanation?

2. Know your audience

Understanding your audience is crucial for tailoring your speech effectively. Consider the demographics of your audience, their interests, and their expectations. For instance, if you're addressing a group of healthcare professionals, you'll want to use medical terminology and data that resonate with them. Conversely, if your audience is a group of young students, you'd adjust your content to be more relatable to their experiences and interests. 

3. Choose a clear message

Your message should be the central idea that you want your audience to take away from your speech. Let's say you're giving a speech on climate change. Your clear message might be something like, "Individual actions can make a significant impact on mitigating climate change." Throughout your speech, all your points and examples should support this central message, reinforcing it for your audience.

4. Structure your speech

Organizing your speech properly keeps your audience engaged and helps them follow your ideas. The introduction should grab your audience's attention and introduce the topic. For example, if you're discussing space exploration, you could start with a fascinating fact about a recent space mission. In the body, you'd present your main points logically, such as the history of space exploration, its scientific significance, and future prospects. Finally, in the conclusion, you'd summarize your key points and reiterate the importance of space exploration in advancing human knowledge.

5. Use engaging content for clarity

Engaging content includes stories, anecdotes, statistics, and examples that illustrate your main points. For instance, if you're giving a speech about the importance of reading, you might share a personal story about how a particular book changed your perspective. You could also include statistics on the benefits of reading, such as improved cognitive abilities and empathy.

6. Maintain clarity and simplicity

It's essential to communicate your ideas clearly. Avoid using overly technical jargon or complex language that might confuse your audience. For example, if you're discussing a medical breakthrough with a non-medical audience, explain complex terms in simple, understandable language.

7. Practice and rehearse

Practice is key to delivering a great speech. Rehearse multiple times to refine your delivery, timing, and tone. Consider using a mirror or recording yourself to observe your body language and gestures. For instance, if you're giving a motivational speech, practice your gestures and expressions to convey enthusiasm and confidence.

8. Consider nonverbal communication

Your body language, tone of voice, and gestures should align with your message . If you're delivering a speech on leadership, maintain strong eye contact to convey authority and connection with your audience. A steady pace and varied tone can also enhance your speech's impact.

9. Engage your audience

Engaging your audience keeps them interested and attentive. Encourage interaction by asking thought-provoking questions or sharing relatable anecdotes. If you're giving a speech on teamwork, ask the audience to recall a time when teamwork led to a successful outcome, fostering engagement and connection.

10. Prepare for Q&A

Anticipate potential questions or objections your audience might have and prepare concise, well-informed responses. If you're delivering a speech on a controversial topic, such as healthcare reform, be ready to address common concerns, like the impact on healthcare costs or access to services, during the Q&A session.

By following these steps and incorporating examples that align with your specific speech topic and purpose, you can craft and deliver a compelling and impactful speech that resonates with your audience.

Woman-at-home-doing-research-in-her-laptop-how-to-give-a-speech

Tools for writing a great speech

There are several helpful tools available for speechwriting, both technological and communication-related. Here are a few examples:

  • Word processing software: Tools like Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or other word processors provide a user-friendly environment for writing and editing speeches. They offer features like spell-checking, grammar correction, formatting options, and easy revision tracking.
  • Presentation software: Software such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Google Slides is useful when creating visual aids to accompany your speech. These tools allow you to create engaging slideshows with text, images, charts, and videos to enhance your presentation.
  • Speechwriting Templates: Online platforms or software offer pre-designed templates specifically for speechwriting. These templates provide guidance on structuring your speech and may include prompts for different sections like introductions, main points, and conclusions.
  • Rhetorical devices and figures of speech: Rhetorical tools such as metaphors, similes, alliteration, and parallelism can add impact and persuasion to your speech. Resources like books, websites, or academic papers detailing various rhetorical devices can help you incorporate them effectively.
  • Speechwriting apps: Mobile apps designed specifically for speechwriting can be helpful in organizing your thoughts, creating outlines, and composing a speech. These apps often provide features like voice recording, note-taking, and virtual prompts to keep you on track.
  • Grammar and style checkers: Online tools or plugins like Grammarly or Hemingway Editor help improve the clarity and readability of your speech by checking for grammar, spelling, and style errors. They provide suggestions for sentence structure, word choice, and overall tone.
  • Thesaurus and dictionary: Online or offline resources such as thesauruses and dictionaries help expand your vocabulary and find alternative words or phrases to express your ideas more effectively. They can also clarify meanings or provide context for unfamiliar terms.
  • Online speechwriting communities: Joining online forums or communities focused on speechwriting can be beneficial for getting feedback, sharing ideas, and learning from experienced speechwriters. It's an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and improve your public speaking skills through collaboration.

Remember, while these tools can assist in the speechwriting process, it's essential to use them thoughtfully and adapt them to your specific needs and style. The most important aspect of speechwriting remains the creativity, authenticity, and connection with your audience that you bring to your speech.

Man-holding-microphone-while-speaking-in-public-how-to-give-a-speech

5 tips for writing a speech

Behind every great speech is an excellent idea and a speaker who refined it. But a successful speech is about more than the initial words on the page, and there are a few more things you can do to help it land.

Here are five more tips for writing and practicing your speech:

1. Structure first, write second

If you start the writing process before organizing your thoughts, you may have to re-order, cut, and scrap the sentences you worked hard on. Save yourself some time by using a speech structure, like the one above, to order your talking points first. This can also help you identify unclear points or moments that disrupt your flow.

2. Do your homework

Data strengthens your argument with a scientific edge. Research your topic with an eye for attention-grabbing statistics, or look for findings you can use to support each point. If you’re pitching a product or service, pull information from company metrics that demonstrate past or potential successes. 

Audience members will likely have questions, so learn all talking points inside and out. If you tell investors that your product will provide 12% returns, for example, come prepared with projections that support that statement.

3. Sound like yourself

Memorable speakers have distinct voices. Think of Martin Luther King Jr’s urgent, inspiring timbre or Oprah’s empathetic, personal tone . Establish your voice — one that aligns with your personality and values — and stick with it. If you’re a motivational speaker, keep your tone upbeat to inspire your audience . If you’re the CEO of a startup, try sounding assured but approachable. 

4. Practice

As you practice a speech, you become more confident , gain a better handle on the material, and learn the outline so well that unexpected questions are less likely to trip you up. Practice in front of a colleague or friend for honest feedback about what you could change, and speak in front of the mirror to tweak your nonverbal communication and body language .

5. Remember to breathe

When you’re stressed, you breathe more rapidly . It can be challenging to talk normally when you can’t regulate your breath. Before your presentation, try some mindful breathing exercises so that when the day comes, you already have strategies that will calm you down and remain present . This can also help you control your voice and avoid speaking too quickly.

How to ghostwrite a great speech for someone else

Ghostwriting a speech requires a unique set of skills, as you're essentially writing a piece that will be delivered by someone else. Here are some tips on how to effectively ghostwrite a speech:

  • Understand the speaker's voice and style : Begin by thoroughly understanding the speaker's personality, speaking style, and preferences. This includes their tone, humor, and any personal anecdotes they may want to include.
  • Interview the speaker : Have a detailed conversation with the speaker to gather information about their speech's purpose, target audience, key messages, and any specific points they want to emphasize. Ask for personal stories or examples they may want to include.
  • Research thoroughly : Research the topic to ensure you have a strong foundation of knowledge. This helps you craft a well-informed and credible speech.
  • Create an outline : Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval.
  • Write in the speaker's voice : While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style. Use language and phrasing that feel natural to them. If they have a particular way of expressing ideas, incorporate that into the speech.
  • Craft a captivating opening : Begin the speech with a compelling opening that grabs the audience's attention. This could be a relevant quote, an interesting fact, a personal anecdote, or a thought-provoking question.
  • Organize content logically : Ensure the speech flows logically, with each point building on the previous one. Use transitions to guide the audience from one idea to the next smoothly.
  • Incorporate engaging stories and examples : Include anecdotes, stories, and real-life examples that illustrate key points and make the speech relatable and memorable.
  • Edit and revise : Edit the speech carefully for clarity, grammar, and coherence. Ensure the speech is the right length and aligns with the speaker's time constraints.
  • Seek feedback : Share drafts of the speech with the speaker for their feedback and revisions. They may have specific changes or additions they'd like to make.
  • Practice delivery : If possible, work with the speaker on their delivery. Practice the speech together, allowing the speaker to become familiar with the content and your writing style.
  • Maintain confidentiality : As a ghostwriter, it's essential to respect the confidentiality and anonymity of the work. Do not disclose that you wrote the speech unless you have the speaker's permission to do so.
  • Be flexible : Be open to making changes and revisions as per the speaker's preferences. Your goal is to make them look good and effectively convey their message.
  • Meet deadlines : Stick to agreed-upon deadlines for drafts and revisions. Punctuality and reliability are essential in ghostwriting.
  • Provide support : Support the speaker during their preparation and rehearsal process. This can include helping with cue cards, speech notes, or any other materials they need.

Remember that successful ghostwriting is about capturing the essence of the speaker while delivering a well-structured and engaging speech. Collaboration, communication, and adaptability are key to achieving this.

Give your best speech yet

Learn how to make a speech that’ll hold an audience’s attention by structuring your thoughts and practicing frequently. Put the effort into writing and preparing your content, and aim to improve your breathing, eye contact , and body language as you practice. The more you work on your speech, the more confident you’ll become.

The energy you invest in writing an effective speech will help your audience remember and connect to every concept. Remember: some life-changing philosophies have come from good speeches, so give your words a chance to resonate with others. You might even change their thinking.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

What this handout is about

This handout will help you create an effective speech by establishing the purpose of your speech and making it easily understandable. It will also help you to analyze your audience and keep the audience interested.

What’s different about a speech?

Writing for public speaking isn’t so different from other types of writing. You want to engage your audience’s attention, convey your ideas in a logical manner and use reliable evidence to support your point. But the conditions for public speaking favor some writing qualities over others. When you write a speech, your audience is made up of listeners. They have only one chance to comprehend the information as you read it, so your speech must be well-organized and easily understood. In addition, the content of the speech and your delivery must fit the audience.

What’s your purpose?

People have gathered to hear you speak on a specific issue, and they expect to get something out of it immediately. And you, the speaker, hope to have an immediate effect on your audience. The purpose of your speech is to get the response you want. Most speeches invite audiences to react in one of three ways: feeling, thinking, or acting. For example, eulogies encourage emotional response from the audience; college lectures stimulate listeners to think about a topic from a different perspective; protest speeches in the Pit recommend actions the audience can take.

As you establish your purpose, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do you want the audience to learn or do?
  • If you are making an argument, why do you want them to agree with you?
  • If they already agree with you, why are you giving the speech?
  • How can your audience benefit from what you have to say?

Audience analysis

If your purpose is to get a certain response from your audience, you must consider who they are (or who you’re pretending they are). If you can identify ways to connect with your listeners, you can make your speech interesting and useful.

As you think of ways to appeal to your audience, ask yourself:

  • What do they have in common? Age? Interests? Ethnicity? Gender?
  • Do they know as much about your topic as you, or will you be introducing them to new ideas?
  • Why are these people listening to you? What are they looking for?
  • What level of detail will be effective for them?
  • What tone will be most effective in conveying your message?
  • What might offend or alienate them?

For more help, see our handout on audience .

Creating an effective introduction

Get their attention, otherwise known as “the hook”.

Think about how you can relate to these listeners and get them to relate to you or your topic. Appealing to your audience on a personal level captures their attention and concern, increasing the chances of a successful speech. Speakers often begin with anecdotes to hook their audience’s attention. Other methods include presenting shocking statistics, asking direct questions of the audience, or enlisting audience participation.

Establish context and/or motive

Explain why your topic is important. Consider your purpose and how you came to speak to this audience. You may also want to connect the material to related or larger issues as well, especially those that may be important to your audience.

Get to the point

Tell your listeners your thesis right away and explain how you will support it. Don’t spend as much time developing your introductory paragraph and leading up to the thesis statement as you would in a research paper for a course. Moving from the intro into the body of the speech quickly will help keep your audience interested. You may be tempted to create suspense by keeping the audience guessing about your thesis until the end, then springing the implications of your discussion on them. But if you do so, they will most likely become bored or confused.

For more help, see our handout on introductions .

Making your speech easy to understand

Repeat crucial points and buzzwords.

Especially in longer speeches, it’s a good idea to keep reminding your audience of the main points you’ve made. For example, you could link an earlier main point or key term as you transition into or wrap up a new point. You could also address the relationship between earlier points and new points through discussion within a body paragraph. Using buzzwords or key terms throughout your paper is also a good idea. If your thesis says you’re going to expose unethical behavior of medical insurance companies, make sure the use of “ethics” recurs instead of switching to “immoral” or simply “wrong.” Repetition of key terms makes it easier for your audience to take in and connect information.

Incorporate previews and summaries into the speech

For example:

“I’m here today to talk to you about three issues that threaten our educational system: First, … Second, … Third,”

“I’ve talked to you today about such and such.”

These kinds of verbal cues permit the people in the audience to put together the pieces of your speech without thinking too hard, so they can spend more time paying attention to its content.

Use especially strong transitions

This will help your listeners see how new information relates to what they’ve heard so far. If you set up a counterargument in one paragraph so you can demolish it in the next, begin the demolition by saying something like,

“But this argument makes no sense when you consider that . . . .”

If you’re providing additional information to support your main point, you could say,

“Another fact that supports my main point is . . . .”

Helping your audience listen

Rely on shorter, simpler sentence structures.

Don’t get too complicated when you’re asking an audience to remember everything you say. Avoid using too many subordinate clauses, and place subjects and verbs close together.

Too complicated:

The product, which was invented in 1908 by Orville Z. McGillicuddy in Des Moines, Iowa, and which was on store shelves approximately one year later, still sells well.

Easier to understand:

Orville Z. McGillicuddy invented the product in 1908 and introduced it into stores shortly afterward. Almost a century later, the product still sells well.

Limit pronoun use

Listeners may have a hard time remembering or figuring out what “it,” “they,” or “this” refers to. Be specific by using a key noun instead of unclear pronouns.

Pronoun problem:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This cannot continue.

Why the last sentence is unclear: “This” what? The government’s failure? Reality TV? Human nature?

More specific:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This failure cannot continue.

Keeping audience interest

Incorporate the rhetorical strategies of ethos, pathos, and logos.

When arguing a point, using ethos, pathos, and logos can help convince your audience to believe you and make your argument stronger. Ethos refers to an appeal to your audience by establishing your authenticity and trustworthiness as a speaker. If you employ pathos, you appeal to your audience’s emotions. Using logos includes the support of hard facts, statistics, and logical argumentation. The most effective speeches usually present a combination these rhetorical strategies.

Use statistics and quotations sparingly

Include only the most striking factual material to support your perspective, things that would likely stick in the listeners’ minds long after you’ve finished speaking. Otherwise, you run the risk of overwhelming your listeners with too much information.

Watch your tone

Be careful not to talk over the heads of your audience. On the other hand, don’t be condescending either. And as for grabbing their attention, yelling, cursing, using inappropriate humor, or brandishing a potentially offensive prop (say, autopsy photos) will only make the audience tune you out.

Creating an effective conclusion

Restate your main points, but don’t repeat them.

“I asked earlier why we should care about the rain forest. Now I hope it’s clear that . . .” “Remember how Mrs. Smith couldn’t afford her prescriptions? Under our plan, . . .”

Call to action

Speeches often close with an appeal to the audience to take action based on their new knowledge or understanding. If you do this, be sure the action you recommend is specific and realistic. For example, although your audience may not be able to affect foreign policy directly, they can vote or work for candidates whose foreign policy views they support. Relating the purpose of your speech to their lives not only creates a connection with your audience, but also reiterates the importance of your topic to them in particular or “the bigger picture.”

Practicing for effective presentation

Once you’ve completed a draft, read your speech to a friend or in front of a mirror. When you’ve finished reading, ask the following questions:

  • Which pieces of information are clearest?
  • Where did I connect with the audience?
  • Where might listeners lose the thread of my argument or description?
  • Where might listeners become bored?
  • Where did I have trouble speaking clearly and/or emphatically?
  • Did I stay within my time limit?

Other resources

  • Toastmasters International is a nonprofit group that provides communication and leadership training.
  • Allyn & Bacon Publishing’s Essence of Public Speaking Series is an extensive treatment of speech writing and delivery, including books on using humor, motivating your audience, word choice and presentation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Boone, Louis E., David L. Kurtz, and Judy R. Block. 1997. Contemporary Business Communication . Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Ehrlich, Henry. 1994. Writing Effective Speeches . New York: Marlowe.

Lamb, Sandra E. 1998. How to Write It: A Complete Guide to Everything You’ll Ever Write . Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

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Grow » thrive, 7 steps to writing a great speech.

These seven steps will help you write a memorable and effective speech.

 Person giving a speech to a group of people.

If you’re preparing for a presentation, the work really begins when you sit down to write your speech. A great speech will engage the audience and can lead to greater personal and professional success. Here are seven steps to writing an effective speech.

Know what your core message is

When preparing to write a speech, you want to start by thinking about the core message you want to share. Your core message should be a topic you’re knowledgeable and passionate about and one that’s relevant to your audience.

The topic should be delivered in a way that’s easy to understand and concise. Ideally, your audience should be able to explain what the speech was about in just one or two sentences.

Think about your audience

Next, you want to learn as much as possible about your audience because this will inform how you deliver the speech. The language you use and the examples you share will depend on the audience you’re speaking to.

As you learn more about your audience, you want to consider the circumstances that brought them together. Are they gathering for a business conference, or is it for a charity event? How big will the audience be, and how knowledgeable are they about the subject you’re speaking on?

[Read more: How to Give a Great Presentation ]

Do your research

The amount of research you complete will depend on how familiar you are with your topic. But even if it’s a topic you know inside and out, it’s a good idea to do at least some research. This will help you gather new information and come up with unique and fresh ideas.

The amount of research you complete will depend on how familiar you are with your topic. But even if it’s a topic you know inside and out, it’s a good idea to do at least some research.

Come up with an outline

Now it’s time to organize your information and ideas into a detailed outline. Organizing your information will make it easier once it’s time to sit down and write the speech. Your outline should include three main parts:

  • Introduction : The introduction sets the stage for the information you’ll be sharing. It’s a good idea to start with a story that will catch your audience’s attention. From there, you can outline what you’ll be sharing and the conclusion you’ll reach.
  • Body : The body of your speech is where you’ll highlight the overarching points you’re trying to make. But be careful not to throw too much information at your audience — two to three main points are enough.
  • Conclusion : During the conclusion, you’ll summarize your core message and what the audience should take away from the speech. Look for ways to end your speech on a strong note, so the audience understands why this topic matters and how they can take action.

Write a draft

Once you have an outline, you can begin drafting your speech. Don’t try to make your speech perfect during the drafting stage — just try to get your ideas on paper. You can come back to revise and improve your speech later.

Choose a presentation tool

If you’re speaking in a professional setting, you’ll likely want to compliment your speech with a presentation tool like PowerPoint. Using a slide deck is a great way to add a visual element to your speech that will further engage the audience. Using a template can make it easier to develop a well-designed slide deck.

[Read more: 6 Business Presentation Tools for Small Businesses ]

Practice and revise

Great speeches take time to write, so you should plan to practice and revise your speech as needed. You can practice your speech in front of a friend or family member, ask for their feedback, and then adjust your speech accordingly.

As you’re revising, focus on using conversational language and short sentences. Look for any areas that are too general or vague, and try to come up with specific examples that will back up your core message.

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How to Write a Speech: Top Tips

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Ashleigh Ferguson

how to write a speech

Table of Contents

9 engaging speech writing tips, what are the different speech types , how to find help writing a speech.

A great speech is impactful and engaging. It should eloquently and clearly express your ideas.

Whatever the topic, a good speech should showcase your authority on a topic and demonstrate excellent communication and leadership skills.

Many people don't know how to write a speech, so the process seems daunting. But there are a few best practices and tips that can make the writing process easier.

In this article, we’ll discuss some best practices to help you write an effective speech that engages and captures your audience.

Public speaking can be nerve-racking. However, having a well-written speech can decrease some of that anxiety.

Even if you’ve never written a speech before, there are still best practices you can follow. 

An engaging speech should be clear, to the point, and follow a logical order. But how do you ensure your speech follows these criteria? Follow these nine engaging speech writing tips.

speech writing tips

Know Your Audience

Analyze your target audience to improve the effectiveness of your speech because different audiences will have different expectations. 

Consider your audience’s age, level of understanding, attitudes, and what they expect to take away from your speech, then tailor your message accordingly. 

For example, if your audience members are teenagers, it’s unlikely that references to the ’70s will be effective.

Start With a Clear Purpose

Decide on the main point of your speech, and make sure all your content supports that point. Choose a topic that fits the following criteria:

A topic that is relevant to your audience

A topic you’re excited about

A topic you have reasonable knowledge about

Organize Your Ideas 

Use a speech outline to organize your thoughts and ideas logically. 

Identify the introduction, body, and conclusion of your speech to help you stay focused and make your speech easier to follow.

Use Strong, Clear Language

Choose your words carefully, and use simple language that is easy to understand. Avoid jargon or technical terms that your audience may not be familiar with. 

Again, your word choice will depend on your audience. For example, you’ll want to steer clear of slang when speaking to an older, conservative crowd.

Use Transitions

Speech transitions are words and phrases that allow you to move smoothly from one point to another. Use transitional words and phrases like “besides” to help your audience follow your thought process and understand how your points are connected.

Add Variety to Speech

A speech that is monotonous or lacks variety may cause your audience to lose interest. 

Including a variety of elements in your speech, such as anecdotes, examples, and visual aids, can help keep your audience engaged and interested. 

Practice, Practice, Practice

Practice your speech out loud to ensure it flows well and you’re comfortable with the material. Read your speech in front of the mirror or before someone you trust to give you critical feedback. Note the points for improvement, and incorporate them into how you deliver your speech.

End With a Strong Conclusion

How would you like to leave your audience members: inspired, informed, or mesmerized? Aim to end your speech on a high note. Summarize your main points, and leave your audience with a memorable takeaway.

Edit and Revise

Proofread and revise your speech to ensure it’s well written and error free. Use a grammar checker, such as ProWritingAid, to correct any grammar issues. You’ll also get suggestions on how to improve your sentence structures and transitions.

How to Write a Good Speech Introduction

speech introduction tips

The introduction can make or break your speech. It’s where you grab your audience’s attention to keep them engaged and state the purpose of your speech. 

An introduction also gives you the opportunity to establish your credibility. You should aim to give your audience a reason to listen to the rest of the speech rather than tuning out.

Here are some tips on how to create a positive first impression.

Start With a Hook

Begin your introduction with a hook that will grab your audience’s attention and make them want to listen. There are several options for a hook:

A statistic

A personal anecdote

Reference to a current or historical event

When thinking of an attention grabber, consider how appropriate and relevant it is to your audience and the purpose of the speech. For example, if you’re giving a speech to an older audience, you can make a historical reference that they can easily relate to.

speech hook ideas

Provide Context

Provide context by giving your audience some background information about the topic of your speech. This will help them understand the importance of what you are talking about and why they should care.

State Your Thesis

Clearly and concisely state the main point or purpose of your speech. Your thesis should be easy to follow and clearly outline the main argument and your stance. This will give your audience a clear understanding of what they can expect to learn from your presentation.

Preview Your Main Points

Give your audience a sense of the structure of your speech by briefly outlining the key points or arguments you will be making. They’ll know what to expect, and your speech will be easier to follow. 

Keep It Short

Your introduction should be concise and to the point, so don’t spend too much time on it. It’s important to keep your speech brief, and avoid including unnecessary or unrelated information. 

The goal is to engage and interest your audience, not bore them, so aim for a few well-chosen words rather than a lengthy introduction. Aim for your introduction to be about 10-15% of the total length of your speech.

4 types of speeches

A speech is just like any other piece of writing. You’ll need to identify your purpose, audience, and intention and then write accordingly. There are many types of speeches, and each type has its own expectations.

Let’s look at some of the most popular speeches and how to write them.

How to Write a Short Speech

Short speeches may be the most tedious to write because of how condensed and concise the information has to be. However, if you ever have to give a farewell, birthday tribute, or just a quick welcome, there are still some tips available to make your speech great.

Start by identifying your topic, title, and the purpose of your speech, which will set the foundation of your outline. Then, determine the main points of your speech; keep it short with two to three points. Remember, a short speech is typically less than ten minutes long, so keep your points concise and to the point.

Since you have limited time to make the most impact, incorporate powerful words or other engaging elements. For example, you could throw out a thought-provoking question or anecdote, which will grab your audience’s attention and keep them engaged.

Finally, once you’ve written your speech, review it for brevity and clarity. 

write a good speech

Be confident about grammar

Check every email, essay, or story for grammar mistakes. Fix them before you press send.

How to Write a Presentation Speech

A presentation speech is used to inform, persuade, explain, or demonstrate a particular topic.

Presentation speeches are well structured and follow a logical flow. They have an introduction, body, and conclusion. Use transition words and phrases to help your speech flow smoothly and prevent it from appearing disjointed.

You can use ProWritingAid to organize your speech and make it even clearer. ProWritingAid’s transition report will show you whether you’re using transitions effectively in your speech.

How to Write a Debate Speech

A debate is a formal argument on a particular topic. Debate speeches are persuasive since the aim is to convince the audience to agree with a stance.

Like most other speeches, a debate speech also follows the introduction, body, conclusion outline. This format helps the audience follow the speaker’s point in a linear and logical way.

When writing your introduction, clarify your stance so it’s clear to the audience. Anyone reading or listening to your speech shouldn’t have any doubt about your position on the topic. Take some time to prepare a solid opener, which can be an interesting fact, a personal story, or even a powerful quote.

The introduction also gives you the opportunity to explain terms your audience will need to understand throughout the speech. You should also provide an overview of your main points, but don’t spend long divulging too much.

Each body paragraph should cover a main point, whether that’s a key idea or a main claim, and each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence. The topic sentence is an initial sentence that summarizes the idea being presented. 

Your conclusion should be a simple and clear reiteration of the points you made in the thesis statement and body paragraphs. Add an attention-grabbing element to leave a lasting impression on your audience.

Remember to use strong and emotive language throughout your speech, which makes it more likely for your audience to feel emotionally connected to your stance.

Always use transition words and phrases to maintain a logical flow between your arguments. Finally, edit and proofread your work for any potential grammar, punctuation, or spelling mistakes.

How to Write an Elevator Speech

An elevator speech is a brief speech that’s used to pitch a product, service, expertise, or credentials.

You have 30–60 seconds to persuade someone to act how you’d like: the same time as a quick elevator ride.

An effective elevator speech should contain an introduction, a clear value proposition, and a strong conclusion. 

elevator speech definition

Your introduction should be polite and clear. Briefly explain who you are, what you do, and what you are offering. For example, if you’re pitching your expertise, condense your background into two sentences. Include things that will make your audience remember you.

End your speech with what you want to achieve. What are you trying to accomplish with this speech? Perhaps it’s a job opportunity, a follow-up meeting, or an internship.

Once you’ve written your speech, be sure to revise it for brevity. Then practice and record yourself to ensure you don’t go over the time limit.

Writing a good speech takes time, but these tips are a good start to improving your speech-writing process. If you encounter writer’s block, look up popular speeches for inspiration. Ask someone you trust to give you feedback once you’ve written your speech.

Finally, while ProWritingAid can’t write your speech for you, it can help you write in a cohesive and logical manner. It highlights any grammar, spelling, and punctuation issues. It also shows you suggestions on how to improve your sentence structure, transition, pacing, and readability, so your next speech can be impactful and memorable.

Ashleigh Ferguson is a Copywriter on the ProWritingAid Team. With an affinity for learning new things, you can always count on her to know some random fact. She’s a self-proclaimed ‘Fix-it Felix’ and a newly minted ‘candle lady’.

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Microsoft 365 Life Hacks > Writing > How To Write a Speech Everyone Will Remember (In a Good Way)

How To Write a Speech Everyone Will Remember (In a Good Way)

Speeches have the power to move, inspire and celebrate some of life’s greatest moments—or make your audience scout out the nearest exit. To keep an audience engaged and deliver a meaningful or persuasive speech—you have to do more than stand up and give an impromptu talk to a room full of people. You need to know how to write a good speech.

A person writing a speech on a tablet

Whether you’re speaking at a graduation or a wedding reception, every good speech follows four important guidelines:

1. Keep it short & sweet. One of the best markers of a good speech is that it ends before people get antsy.

2. Don’t make it about you. You may have everyone’s attention, but keep the spotlight where it belongs—on the audience.

3. Practice, practice, practice. Practice with a friend, use a free coaching tool , or record yourself and listen for any parts that venture off topic or don’t need to be included.

4. Watch your grammar. Run a grammar check on your script to avoid embarrassing errors or even possible bias in your final speech.

Different types of speeches have special considerations, too. Here are some of the most common types, along with additional tips to deliver them well.

How to write a best man speech or maid of honor speech :

  • Be generous with compliments. Thank the other speakers, congratulate the newlyweds, and say a few nice words about the ceremony, the other guests, and the couple themselves. Convey the warmth that the occasion brings.
  • Be strategically funny. You’ll probably have people from different generations and cultures there to celebrate, and possibly even the boss or colleagues of the bride and groom. Humor is great, but don’t cross the line with things like inappropriate jokes, references to exes, or embarrassing anecdotes that could make Grandma blush and give the newlyweds something to fight about on their honeymoon.
  • End on a celebratory note. Leave the happy couple and their guests feeling even more joyful. Read a memorable quote or love poem, and then propose a toast or invite the guests to applaud the happy couple.

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How to write a graduation speech :

Gather inspiration. Some of history’s best graduation speeches are posted online as transcripts and videos. Watch them for inspiration on topics, delivery, and overall themes that you can emulate in your own speech.

  • Acknowledge the graduates and their supporters. Thank and acknowledge the faculty and families while you name and celebrate the accomplishments of the graduates. Hitting an educational milestone is a team effort that deserves broad recognition.
  • End with an inspirational look toward the future. Graduation is an ending that is also a beginning. End your speech with a positive quote or your own heartfelt message about a bright future.

How to write a persuasive speech :

  • Describe the current situation in detail. Set the stage by giving context to the idea or argument you’re going to introduce. Describe the current state along with any different viewpoints that are being widely shared.
  • Share the drawbacks of inaction. Describe the pitfalls of not adopting an idea, changing an approach, or doing the thing you’d like them to do. Provide supporting facts that demonstrate how important it is to find a solution.
  • Introduce your solution. Share your idea or solution and describe why it’s the best approach. Paint a picture of how things will be once the solution is in place. Clearly tie it to the pitfalls you described before. End with a clear call to action.

How to write an informative speech:

  • Create a strong thesis. After you set the context with a brief introduction, deliver a strong, clear thesis statement. Make a note to follow your statement with a pause to emphasize the importance of your thesis statement and allow the audience to fully take it in.
  • Consider the audience. Focusing on your audience, decide what type of information and what level of detail they’ll be most interested in. Include stories or anecdotes that will resonate.
  • End with a concluding statement. Summarize the information you shared and why your audience should care. End your speech with a strong, concise conclusion that reiterates your thesis statement and leaves your audience with the main takeaway of your speech.

Above all, have fun. A good speech is a gift to your audience that they’ll remember for years to come.

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How to write a good speech in 7 steps

By:  Susan Dugdale  | Last modified: 09-11-2022

- an easily followed format for writing a great speech

Did you know writing a speech doesn't have be an anxious, nail biting experience?

Unsure? Don't be.

You may have lived with the idea you were never good with words for a long time. Or perhaps giving speeches at school brought you out in cold sweats.

However learning how to write a speech is relatively straight forward when you learn to write out loud.

And that's the journey I am offering to take you on: step by step.

To learn quickly, go slow

Take all the time you need. This speech format has 7 steps, each building on the next.

Walk, rather than run, your way through all of them. Don't be tempted to rush. Familiarize yourself with the ideas. Try them out.

I know there are well-advertised short cuts and promises of 'write a speech in 5 minutes'. However in reality they only truly work for somebody who already has the basic foundations of speech writing in place.

The foundation of good speech writing 

These steps are the backbone of sound speech preparation. Learn and follow them well at the outset and yes, given more experience and practice you could probably flick something together quickly. Like any skill, the more it's used, the easier it gets.

In the meantime...

Step 1: Begin with a speech overview or outline

Are you in a hurry? Without time to read a whole page? Grab ... The Quick How to Write a Speech Checklist And come back to get the details later.

  • WHO you are writing your speech for (your target audience)
  • WHY you are preparing this speech. What's the main purpose of your speech? Is it to inform or tell your audience about something? To teach them a new skill or demonstrate something? To persuade or to entertain? (See 4 types of speeches: informative, demonstrative, persuasive and special occasion or entertaining for more.) What do you want them to think, feel or do as a result of listening the speech?
  • WHAT your speech is going to be about (its topic) - You'll want to have thought through your main points and have ranked them in order of importance. And have sorted the supporting research you need to make those points effectively.
  • HOW much time you have for your speech eg. 3 minutes, 5 minutes... The amount of time you've been allocated dictates how much content you need. If you're unsure check this page: how many words per minute in a speech: a quick reference guide . You'll find estimates of the number of words required for 1 - 10 minute speeches by slow, medium and fast talkers.

Use an outline

The best way to make sure you deliver a perfect speech is to start by carefully completing a speech outline covering the essentials: WHO, WHY, WHAT and HOW.

Beginning to write without thinking your speech through is a bit like heading off on a journey not knowing why you're traveling or where you're going to end up. You can find yourself lost in a deep, dark, murky muddle of ideas very quickly!

Pulling together a speech overview or outline is a much safer option. It's the map you'll follow to get where you want to go.

Get a blank speech outline template to complete

Click the link to find out a whole lot more about preparing a speech outline . ☺ You'll also find a free printable blank speech outline template.  I recommend using it!

Understanding speech construction

Before you begin to write, using your completed outline as a guide, let's briefly look at what you're aiming to prepare.

  • an opening or introduction
  • the body where the bulk of the information is given
  • and an ending (or summary).

Imagine your speech as a sandwich

Image: gourmet sandwich with labels on the top (opening) and bottom (conclusion) slices of bread and filling, (body). Text: Key ingredients for a superb speech sandwich.

If you think of a speech as a sandwich you'll get the idea.

The opening and ending are the slices of bread holding the filling (the major points or the body of your speech) together.

You can build yourself a simple sandwich with one filling (one big idea) or you could go gourmet and add up to three or, even five. The choice is yours.

But whatever you choose to serve, as a good cook, you need to consider who is going to eat it! And that's your audience.

So let's find out who they are before we do anything else. 

Step 2: Know who you are talking to

Understanding your audience.

Did you know a  good speech is never written from the speaker's point of view?  ( If you need to know more about why check out this page on  building rapport .)

Begin with the most important idea/point on your outline.

Consider HOW you can explain (show, tell) that to your audience in the most effective way for them to easily understand it.   

Writing from the audience's point of view

write a good speech

To help you write from an audience point of view, it's a good idea to identify either a real person or the type of person who is most likely to be listening to you.

Make sure you select someone who represents the "majority" of the people who will be in your audience. That is they are neither struggling to comprehend you at the bottom of your scale or light-years ahead at the top.

Now imagine they are sitting next to you eagerly waiting to hear what you're going to say. Give them a name, for example, Joe, to help make them real.

Ask yourself

  • How do I need to tailor my information to meet Joe's needs? For example, do you tell personal stories to illustrate your main points? Absolutely! Yes. This is a very powerful technique. (Click storytelling in speeches to find out more.)
  • What type or level of language is right for Joe as well as my topic? For example if I use jargon (activity, industry or profession specific vocabulary) will it be understood?

Step 3: Writing as you speak

Writing oral language.

Write down what you want to say about your first main point as if you were talking directly to Joe.

If it helps, say it all out loud before you write it down and/or record it.

Use the information below as a guide

Infographic: The Characteristics of Spoken Language - 7 points of difference with examples.

(Click to download The Characteristics of Spoken Language  as a pdf.) 

You do not have to write absolutely everything you're going to say down * but you do need to write down, or outline, the sequence of ideas to ensure they are logical and easily followed.

Remember too, to explain or illustrate your point with examples from your research. 

( * Tip: If this is your first speech the safety net of having everything written down could be just what you need. It's easier to recover from a patch of jitters when you have a word by word manuscript than if you have either none, or a bare outline. Your call!)

Step 4: Checking tone and language

The focus of this step is re-working what you've done in Step 2 and 3.

You identified who you were talking to (Step 2) and in Step 3, wrote up your first main point.  Is it right? Have you made yourself clear?  Check it.

Graphic:cartoon drawing of a woman sitting in front of a laptop. Text:How to write a speech: checking tone and language.

How well you complete this step depends on how well you understand the needs of the people who are going to listen to your speech.

Please do not assume because you know what you're talking about the person (Joe) you've chosen to represent your audience will too. Joe is not a mind-reader!

How to check what you've prepared

  • Check the "tone" of your language . Is it right for the occasion, subject matter and your audience?
  • Check the length of your sentences. You need short sentences. If they're too long or complicated you risk losing your listeners.

Check for jargon too. These are industry, activity or group exclusive words.

For instance take the phrase: authentic learning . This comes from teaching and refers to connecting lessons to the daily life of students. Authentic learning is learning that is relevant and meaningful for students. If you're not a teacher you may not understand the phrase.

The use of any vocabulary requiring insider knowledge needs to be thought through from the audience perspective. Jargon can close people out.

  • Read what you've written out loud. If it flows naturally, in a logical manner, continue the process with your next main idea. If it doesn't, rework.

We use whole sentences and part ones, and we mix them up with asides or appeals e.g. "Did you get that? Of course you did. Right...Let's move it along. I was saying ..."

Click for more about the differences between spoken and written language .

And now repeat the process

Repeat this process for the remainder of your main ideas.

Because you've done the first one carefully, the rest should follow fairly easily.

Step 5: Use transitions

Providing links or transitions between main ideas.

Between each of your main ideas you need to provide a bridge or pathway for your audience. The clearer the pathway or bridge, the easier it is for them to make the transition from one idea to the next.

Graphic - girl walking across a bridge. Text - Using transitions to link ideas.

If your speech contains more than three main ideas and each is building on the last, then consider using a "catch-up" or summary as part of your transitions.

Is your speech being evaluated? Find out exactly what aspects you're being assessed on using this standard speech evaluation form

Link/transition examples

A link can be as simple as:

"We've explored one scenario for the ending of Block Buster 111, but let's consider another. This time..."

What follows this transition is the introduction of Main Idea Two.

Here's a summarizing link/transition example:

"We've ended Blockbuster 111 four ways so far. In the first, everybody died. In the second, everybody died BUT their ghosts remained to haunt the area. In the third, one villain died. His partner reformed and after a fight-out with the hero, they both strode off into the sunset, friends forever. In the fourth, the hero dies in a major battle but is reborn sometime in the future.

And now what about one more? What if nobody died? The fifth possibility..."

Go back through your main ideas checking the links. Remember Joe as you go. Try each transition or link out loud and really listen to yourself. Is it obvious? Easily followed?

Keep them if they are clear and concise.

For more about transitions (with examples) see Andrew Dlugan's excellent article, Speech Transitions: Magical words and Phrases .

Step 6: The end of your speech

The ideal ending is highly memorable . You want it to live on in the minds of your listeners long after your speech is finished. Often it combines a call to action with a summary of major points.

Comic Graphic: End with a bang

Example speech endings

Example 1: The desired outcome of a speech persuading people to vote for you in an upcoming election is that they get out there on voting day and do so. You can help that outcome along by calling them to register their support by signing a prepared pledge statement as they leave.

"We're agreed we want change. You can help us give it to you by signing this pledge statement as you leave. Be part of the change you want to see!

Example 2: The desired outcome is increased sales figures. The call to action is made urgent with the introduction of time specific incentives.

"You have three weeks from the time you leave this hall to make that dream family holiday in New Zealand yours. Can you do it? Will you do it? The kids will love it. Your wife will love it. Do it now!"

How to figure out the right call to action

A clue for working out what the most appropriate call to action might be, is to go back to your original purpose for giving the speech.

  • Was it to motivate or inspire?
  • Was it to persuade to a particular point of view?
  • Was it to share specialist information?
  • Was it to celebrate a person, a place, time or event?

Ask yourself what you want people to do as a result of having listened to your speech.

For more about ending speeches

Visit this page for more about how to end a speech effectively . You'll find two additional types of speech endings with examples.

Write and test

Write your ending and test it out loud. Try it out on a friend, or two. Is it good? Does it work?

Step 7: The introduction

Once you've got the filling (main ideas) the linking and the ending in place, it's time to focus on the introduction.

The introduction comes last as it's the most important part of your speech. This is the bit that either has people sitting up alert or slumped and waiting for you to end. It's the tone setter!

What makes a great speech opening?

Ideally you want an opening that makes listening to you the only thing the 'Joes' in the audience want to do.

You want them to forget they're hungry or that their chair is hard or that their bills need paying.

The way to do that is to capture their interest straight away. You do this with a "hook".

Hooks to catch your audience's attention

Hooks come in as many forms as there are speeches and audiences. Your task is work out what specific hook is needed to catch your audience.

Graphic: shoal of fish and two hooked fishing lines. Text: Hooking and holding attention

Go back to the purpose. Why are you giving this speech?

Once you have your answer, consider your call to action. What do you want the audience to do, and, or take away, as a result of listening to you?

Next think about the imaginary or real person you wrote for when you were focusing on your main ideas.

Choosing the best hook

  • Is it humor?
  • Would shock tactics work?
  • Is it a rhetorical question?
  • Is it formality or informality?
  • Is it an outline or overview of what you're going to cover, including the call to action?
  • Or is it a mix of all these elements?

A hook example

Here's an example from a fictional political speech. The speaker is lobbying for votes. His audience are predominately workers whose future's are not secure.

"How's your imagination this morning? Good? (Pause for response from audience) Great, I'm glad. Because we're going to put it to work starting right now.

I want you to see your future. What does it look like? Are you happy? Is everything as you want it to be? No? Let's change that. We could do it. And we could do it today.

At the end of this speech you're going to be given the opportunity to change your world, for a better one ...

No, I'm not a magician. Or a simpleton with big ideas and precious little commonsense. I'm an ordinary man, just like you. And I have a plan to share!"

And then our speaker is off into his main points supported by examples. The end, which he has already foreshadowed in his opening, is the call to vote for him.

Prepare several hooks

Experiment with several openings until you've found the one that serves your audience, your subject matter and your purpose best.

For many more examples of speech openings go to: how to write a speech introduction . You'll find 12 of the very best ways to start a speech.

write a good speech

That completes the initial seven steps towards writing your speech. If you've followed them all the way through, congratulations, you now have the text of your speech!

Although you might have the words, you're still a couple of steps away from being ready to deliver them. Both of them are essential if you want the very best outcome possible. They are below. Please take them.

Step 8: Checking content and timing

This step pulls everything together.

Check once, check twice, check three times & then once more!

Go through your speech really carefully.

On the first read through check you've got your main points in their correct order with supporting material, plus an effective introduction and ending.

On the second read through check the linking passages or transitions making sure they are clear and easily followed.

On the third reading check your sentence structure, language use and tone.

Double, triple check the timing

Now go though once more.

This time read it aloud slowly and time yourself.

If it's too long for the time allowance you've been given make the necessary cuts.

Start by looking at your examples rather than the main ideas themselves. If you've used several examples to illustrate one principal idea, cut the least important out.

Also look to see if you've repeated yourself unnecessarily or, gone off track. If it's not relevant, cut it.

Repeat the process, condensing until your speech fits the required length, preferably coming in just under your time limit.

You can also find out how approximately long it will take you to say the words you have by using this very handy words to minutes converter . It's an excellent tool, one I frequently use. While it can't give you a precise time, it does provide a reasonable estimate.

Graphic: Click to read example speeches of all sorts.

Step 9: Rehearsing your speech

And NOW you are finished with writing the speech, and are ready for REHEARSAL .

write a good speech

Please don't be tempted to skip this step. It is not an extra thrown in for good measure. It's essential.

The "not-so-secret" secret of successful speeches combines good writing with practice, practice and then, practicing some more.

Go to how to practice public speaking and you'll find rehearsal techniques and suggestions to boost your speech delivery from ordinary to extraordinary.

The Quick How to Write a Speech Checklist

Before you begin writing you need:.

  • Your speech OUTLINE with your main ideas ranked in the order you're going to present them. (If you haven't done one complete this 4 step sample speech outline . It will make the writing process much easier.)
  • Your RESEARCH
  • You also need to know WHO you're speaking to, the PURPOSE of the speech and HOW long you're speaking for

The basic format

  • the body where you present your main ideas

Split your time allowance so that you spend approximately 70% on the body and 15% each on the introduction and ending.

How to write the speech

  • Write your main ideas out incorporating your examples and research
  • Link them together making sure each flows in a smooth, logical progression
  • Write your ending, summarizing your main ideas briefly and end with a call for action
  • Write your introduction considering the 'hook' you're going to use to get your audience listening
  • An often quoted saying to explain the process is: Tell them what you're going to tell them (Introduction) Tell them (Body of your speech - the main ideas plus examples) Tell them what you told them (The ending)

TEST before presenting. Read aloud several times to check the flow of material, the suitability of language and the timing.

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  • 11 Tips for Giving a Great Speech

write a good speech

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Chances are you’ll be asked to give speeches or presentations in classes at school. If you get involved in volunteer groups, brief speeches to open events or thank participants are a must. Then there are the speeches at events such as weddings, as well as speeches that you might have to give in the workplace. That amounts to the average person being required to give quite a lot of speeches, even if they don’t get involved in an area such as politics where the ability to give a good speech becomes even more important. You might also have suffered through quite a number of bad speeches from other people – whether that’s at family events where the microphone squeaks the whole way through or a school presentation where the headteacher can’t quite make the jokes work. If you don’t want to inflict the same sort of experience on others, here are our top tips for giving a great speech.

1. Practise your microphone technique

Correct spacing is key - you want to be heard but don't want to end up deafening your audience!

2. Keep it short

Be strict with yourself when it comes to timing.

Particularly at something like a party or a wedding, no one will be unhappy if your speech runs a little short; it’ll just give them more time to investigate the canapés. If you are giving a speech for a class in school, and it’ll be assessed, you need to prioritise keeping it within the required time limits. But even under these circumstances, if you’ve been tasked – say – with giving a 10-15 minute speech, it’s usually better to come in nearer the 10 than the 15 minute mark. Put simply, even if your speech is terrible, your audience can probably tolerate it for 10 minutes. Much longer, and they’ll be struggling. This shouldn’t limit what you can cover; in the film Up , the whole of Carl and Ellie’s heartbreaking love story is told in under 12 minutes. Do you really need longer to make your points? Achieve brevity by writing out the speech you would give if you had all the time in the world, and then cut anything that seems extraneous or boring.

3. Consider what your audience wants to hear

If you are giving a speech in class because it’s your assignment, what your audience wants to hear is likely to be “the bell ringing for lunch”; you can’t help them there. But under other circumstances, consider what your audience wants to hear and what you want to say, and strive for there to be as much overlap as possible. In the context of a political speech, for instance, what you want to say might be why your party should receive votes; what your audience wants to hear is what your party would do for them, if they won power. Hopefully it should be possible to write a speech that meets both sets of needs, rather than focusing solely on whatever it is that you want to say and leaving your audience disappointed.

4. Pick a theme and stick to it

Beware: digressions ahead.

Here’s a goal for giving a speech: someone sitting near the back, who’s messing around on their phone for at least two-thirds of it and focusing mainly on how long it will be until lunch, should nonetheless be able to give a reasonably accurate answer to the question, “what was it about?” If you’re supposed to be giving a speech in defence of the nuclear deterrent, for example, both the topic and your position on it should be clearly identifiable. This means – to stick with the nuclear deterrent example – not talking for a while about jobs, and then the wider economy, and then the North-South divide, and then Scottish independence, and then Ukraine with a brief digression into South Ossetia before rounding off by squeaking out “and that’s why we should renew Trident!” seconds before you run out of time – no matter how relevant that cornucopia of topics may feel (and they are all relevant, albeit tenuously). It means that even if you do have to take a while to explain a more complex idea, you need to be concise, and bring it back to your theme as quickly as you can.

5. Speak slowly

Most people speak more quickly than they realise when they’re on stage, especially if they’re nervous. But no one will be able to follow your speech if you’re jabbering it out. Thankfully, this one is easy to fix with a little effort and practise. First of all, figure out how quickly you’re actually speaking: do a word count for your speech and then time yourself saying it. A fast speaker will speak at maybe 160 words per minute, a slow speaker at 100 wpm and an average speaker at 130 wpm. For a formal speech, you want to be speaking on the slow side. While this will vary by culture and environment, 120 wpm is a reasonable target to aim for; slow enough that everyone should be able to understand you, and fast enough that you hopefully won’t be sending them to sleep.

6. Tell a couple of jokes

A touch of humour won't go amiss, even if you're not a natural comedian.

This is a tricky tip because there are lots of pitfalls in the world of telling jokes. For instance, there’s the temptation to include an in-joke that three of your friends will understand and find hilarious, that is utterly baffling to everyone else in the room. Avoid this – if you include any jokes, witty references or anything along those lines, make sure they are accessible to everyone present. All the same, if you can manage a joke or two, it can be a useful way to break up a speech and retain the audience’s interest. A little self-deprecation (not too much!) or the use of classic joke formats such as “the scene was chaotic; it looked as if a bomb had hit and we didn’t know where to start on repairs – but that’s enough about the hen party…” work nicely even if you’re not very confident. Don’t turn it into a stand-up comedy sketch if you’re not a comedian, don’t wait for ages for laughter that’s not showing up, and don’t make jokes at the expense of anyone who you don’t know for sure can take it.

7. Don’t be afraid to repeat yourself if you need to

If you follow US or UK politics at all, you’ve probably heard some of these phrases recently: take back control, make America great again, long-term economic plan, son of a bus driver. Three of these have already led the party or people they’re associated with to electoral victory; the fourth remains to be seen. To take the ‘son of a bus driver’ as an example, this refers to Sadiq Khan, now Mayor of London. There can be hardly anyone in London who doesn’t know what their Mayor’s dad did for a living. Meanwhile, many of them probably can’t remember his rival Zac Goldsmith’s name, let alone anything he said during the campaign. The point is that repetition works. In pursuit of point 4, if you want people to remember your key theme, you’re going to have to say it more than once. Don’t assume that everyone will have paid attention to everything you’ve said, unless you’re in a classroom setting where they’ll get told off if they don’t.

8. Only use the visual aids you need

Scratch the notes and speak directly to your audience.

This tip applies to two things: PowerPoints and notes. If you can do without either (and your assignment allows it), then do. Every time you’re glancing over your notes or up at the screen, fiddling with the laptop to get the slide to move on, fighting with a video that isn’t working or struggling to read your own handwriting, is time that you’re not spending engaging with your audience. A well-written, clear speech delivered without notes is always going to be better than someone awkwardly reading aloud the bullet points on their PowerPoint slides. If you must do a presentation – for instance, because there are photos that need to be included – have as little text on it as possible, preferably none. That way, if there are people at the back who can’t really see the screen through the sea of heads in front of them, they’ll still be able to follow what you’re saying.

9. Get a friend to check for awkward mannerisms

Mannerisms that are entirely fine in normal life become awkward and strange when you’re speaking in public. Perhaps you’re inclined to fiddle with your hair or your cuffs, you rock back and forth on the balls of your feet, or you have a habit of reaching your hand to your cheek when you’re talking. No one would notice in everyday conversation, but when you’re on a stage, it’ll become all they’ll see. Some of this is easily avoidable – for instance, if you have long hair that you’re inclined to twirl or otherwise fiddle with, tie it up. For other mannerisms, get the critical friend who helped you sort out your microphone technique to tell you what they are, and do your best to suppress the more annoying ones.

10. Look around the room

Overly intense eye-contact can easily feel intimidating.

Talking about eye contact usually has the effect of making normal eye contact a lot harder, and so does giving a speech. All of a sudden, you’re up on stage, and you have no idea what a normal way to look at a group of people is. Some speakers deal with this by picking a point in the middle distance and speaking to it; others by picking a particular person near to the back and addressing their entire speech at them. This is obviously no fun for that person, who probably spends the whole thing feeling extremely uncomfortable, but it’s not too weird for everyone else. Better still, though, if you can manage it, is to look slowly and steadily around the room, trying to make eye contact with a decent range of people, before returning to the middle distance for a while, rinse and repeat. This needs to be slow and steady, or you give the impression that you’ve just smelled smoke and are casting about for a fire exit before the stampede beings.

11. Don’t be scared of a good reaction

If your speech is genuinely engaging, funny, inspiring or any of the other things you might hope it would be, your audience will react to it. There might be laughter, or applause, or even a bit of cheering depending on the setting. This can be daunting because when you’re practising your speech in front of your bedroom mirror, there’s no way to prepare for it. And it’s where even the best speakers can go wrong, by launching straight into what they were going to say next without waiting for the laughter or applause to stop, or by looking painfully awkward while it’s going on. It’s a pitfall that’s mostly solved by being aware it might happen. If your audience is applauding you or otherwise reacting well, it’s OK to smile, look up, wait for them to stop and then keep going with your speech – it’s as simple as that. You could even throw in a “thank you” before you continue in the knowledge that it’s all going well. Image credits: microphones ; audience ; boy with microphone ; clock ; winding road ; enjoy a joke ; sticky notes ; 

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How to Make a Good Speech for School

Last Updated: February 10, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Patrick Muñoz . Patrick is an internationally recognized Voice & Speech Coach, focusing on public speaking, vocal power, accent and dialects, accent reduction, voiceover, acting and speech therapy. He has worked with clients such as Penelope Cruz, Eva Longoria, and Roselyn Sanchez. He was voted LA's Favorite Voice and Dialect Coach by BACKSTAGE, is the voice and speech coach for Disney and Turner Classic Movies, and is a member of Voice and Speech Trainers Association. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,253,000 times.

A good speech in school will earn you the admiration of your teachers and peers alike. You probably won't deliver the kind of speech you hear in the movies, but that's a good thing: people will enjoy your original take much more. From getting an idea to conquering stage fright, here are the steps to take if you want to make your final speech a memorable, exciting success.

Sample Speeches

write a good speech

Writing the Speech

Step 1 Choose a topic or theme.

  • If you're not sure which theme to choose, write down or summarize a few stories and statements you could include in your speech. Pick the ones you like best and see if there's a unifying theme to tie them together.
  • See What to Do and What Not to Do for more advice on themes.

Step 2 Pick a tone that makes you comfortable.

  • Don't interrupt one point with a clause, or section set aside by commas or parentheses. Instead of saying "Our tennis and basketball teams, which we all know won the regional championships two years ago, need increased funding to compete," say "Our tennis and basketball teams both won the regional championships two years ago. Now we need to increase their funding to compete with other schools."
  • You can reference your school's slang once or twice to get a laugh, but don't overdo it, especially if there are parents in the audience.

Step 4 Write down original stories and messages.

  • Find a broad message that your whole audience can connect to their own life, but still deals with a specific idea. For instance: "Become an even better version of the hero who inspired you." (But don't steal your "original" idea from this website!)
  • Your stories can be specific incidents in your life or from history, but you should connect them to a more general idea. For instance, you could tell a story about your sibling's hospital visit, then go on to talk about overcoming fear and hardship in general.
  • If you like what you're writing but it doesn't fit the theme you had planned, it's fine to adjust your topic or switch it entirely. Switch back and forth between writing stories and brainstorming a theme if you keep getting stuck.

Step 5 Find a gripping way to begin your speech.

  • Surprise your audience by diving right into a tough story. "When I was ten years old, I lost my father."
  • Make your audience laugh by telling a joke, especially one that everyone in the room will get. "Hello everyone. Let's have a round of applause for the guy who installed air conditioning."
  • Start with a grand, thought-provoking statement. "Our galaxy contains billions of earth-like planets, and we're only just beginning to discover them."
  • Most likely, someone else will introduce you, and many of your classmates know you already. Unless you're asked specifically to introduce yourself, you can get right to the good stuff.

Step 6 Make the theme clear.

  • To use an example from earlier, if your theme is "Become an even better version of the hero who inspired you," you could begin your speech with two or three sentence about your hero, then say "You all have heroes who inspire you, but you don't have to just follow them. You can become even greater than the people you look up to."

Step 7 Move from one idea to the next in a natural order.

  • Include phrases such as "Now I'd like to talk about..." and "But we should also remember..." when moving on to your next idea.

Step 8 End with a memorable statement that captures your speech.

  • Build up to a big ending, then crack a joke to wrap up a funny speech. "And I know when you walk to the ballot box tomorrow, you'll be ready to do the right thing. Protect the interests of yourself and your school by washing your hands afterward. Do you know how many people touch that thing?"
  • If you're giving a commencement speech, leave people feeling excited or awed about the future. This is a big moment and you have the power to help them realize it. "Years from now, you will be the father or mother your kid looks up to. The writer who changes the way we think. The inventor who creates new ways to live. Come up to the stage and start becoming heroes!"

Step 9 Edit and polish it as much as possible.

  • Have a teacher, family member, or trusted friend check it over for grammar mistakes and offer feedback. Spelling isn't as important, since you'll be speaking out loud.

Step 10 Consider visual aids.

  • If your topic involves a lot of numbers, plan to write them on the board so your audience can remember them

Step 11 Turn the speech into note cards, then practice!

  • Your notes are there to remind you what to say next and of important facts. "Move on to bear wrestling story (guy's name is Paul Bunyan)" is the level of detail you need.

Practicing and Delivering the Speech

Step 1 Think about movement and materials.

  • Practice giving your speech in as situation as similar to your actual speech as possible.
  • In general, you should stay fairly still while giving a speech. Small hand gestures and occasionally moving to a new spot are fine, especially if they help you feel and appear confident

Step 2 Practice speaking loudly and clearly.

  • If you speech is too long, you absolutely need to cut some material out of it or shorten the longer stories or ideas. If you're giving a commencement speech, aim for a 10 or 15 minute maximum. An election speech should be no more than a few minutes, and your teacher should be able to tell you the time limit for a class assignment speech.

Step 4 Talk slowly and pause between ideas.

  • If you can't stop rushing, work out how long you should spend on each section and write the number of minutes at the top of each index card or paragraph. Practice near a clock so you can check whether you're on pace.

Step 5 Deliver your speech to a mirror until you can do it without reading.

  • Use slightly different words each time once you have the main ideas down. Try not to get caught up on exact memorization; using a new phrase to communicate the written idea makes your speech sound more natural.

Step 6 Pay attention to other details once you become comfortable with the content.

  • Practice varying your facial expression if your face looks fixed and mechanical.
  • Try to vary the tone of your voice as well. Don't make it sound like you're reciting every word from memory; pretend you're speaking in ordinary conversation.

Step 7 Practice in front of a test audience.

  • Try to make eye contact with different members of your audience throughout the speech. Don't stare at any one person for too long.
  • Resist the temptation to hide by standing near a corner or large object.
  • Don't fidget, tap your foot, or make other nervous gestures. Try slowly walking back and forth across the stage to get rid of your nervous energy.

Step 8 Use their feedback to practice more.

  • Dressing nicely will increase your confidence and gain respect and attention from your audience.

What to Do and What Not to Do

Step 1 Choose an appropriate theme (for an election speech).

  • Memories your class shares and personal memories that many people will connect to, such as your first day at the school.
  • Overcoming obstacles. Talk about how your classmates overcame problems related to academics, finances, and health, and how proud everyone is that they're standing here.
  • The diversity of your classmates and celebrating the rich variety of experiences, personalities, and interests at your school. Describe some of the many ways people will go on to do good in the world.

Step 3 Use techniques to make your speech more memorable.

  • Address your audience directly. Ask them questions to get them thinking, although you shouldn't expect an answer.
  • Use groups of three. The human brain loves repetition, and especially trios. Start three sentences with the same phrase, speaking louder each sentence.
  • Use emotive language. Try to provoke a strong emotional response in your audience, not present a list of facts to them.

Step 4 Thank specific people, but don't go on too long.

  • Don't tell stories that only a few friends will understand. Even references that your whole class will get should be used sparingly if there are parents in the room as well.

Step 6 Avoid clichés.

  • Go change the world!
  • Today is not the last day of your education, but the first.
  • The future belongs to you.
  • If elected, I will be the voice of the students.
  • It's time for change!

Step 7 Don't insult or offend anyone.

  • If you're giving a high school commencement speech, remember that not everyone in your class will be attending college. Don't joke about your education letting you avoid a "bad" profession; chances are good there's a parent who has that job out in the audience.=

Expert Q&A

Patrick Muñoz

  • Look at everyone in the audience, not just one person. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Make sure you don't offend or embarrass your audience. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Before you start, pick a spot on the wall to focus on. Throughout the speech, keep looking at that spot after each sentence. This shows to your audience and teacher that you can make eye contact! Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

write a good speech

Things You'll Need

  • Writing tool
  • Index cards

You Might Also Like

Prepare and Give a Speech

  • ↑ [v161163_b01].12 November 2019.
  • ↑ https://finley-h.schools.nsw.gov.au/content/dam/doe/sws/schools/f/finley-h/localcontent/how_to_write_a_speech.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.toastmasters.org/magazine/articles/for-the-novice-six-simple-steps-to-writing-a-fantastic-speech
  • ↑ https://www.unr.edu/writing-speaking-center/student-resources/writing-speaking-resources/speech-introductions
  • ↑ [v161163_b01]. 12 November 2019.
  • ↑ https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zv7fqp3/articles/z4w96v4
  • ↑ http://classroom.synonym.com/write-good-speech-school-4859.html
  • ↑ https://www.unr.edu/writing-speaking-center/student-resources/writing-speaking-resources/speech-delivery
  • ↑ https://library.taylor.edu/kin-355/speech

About This Article

Patrick Muñoz

To make a good speech for school, choose a theme or topic to focus your speech on so it's easier to write. When you're writing your speech, stick with simple language so your audience understands and doesn't get bored. Also, try to start your speech with a joke, story, or shocking fact that will immediately grab their attention. Remember to talk directly to your audience by asking rhetorical questions and making references they'll understand. End your speech with something memorable, like an inspirational quote or a call to action. To learn more about how to practice and memorize your speech before you present it, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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5 Tips on How to Write a Speech Essay

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  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

When figuring out how to write a speech, the essay form can offer a good foundation for the process. Just like essays, all speeches have three main sections: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion.

However, unlike essays, speeches must be written to be heard as opposed to being read. You need to write a speech in a way that keeps the attention of an audience and helps paint a mental image at the same time. This means that your speech should contain some color, drama, or humor . It should have “flair.” Make your speech memorable by using attention-grabbing anecdotes and examples.

Determine the Type of Speech You're Writing

Since there are different types of speeches, your attention-grabbing techniques should fit the speech type.

Informative  and instructional  speeches inform your audience about a topic, event, or area of knowledge. This can be a how-to on podcasting for teens or a historical report on the Underground Railroad. It also can relate to health and beauty, such as "How to Shape Perfect Eyebrows," or hobby-related, such as "Make a Great Bag Out of Old Clothing."​

Persuasive  speeches attempt to convince or  persuade  the audience to join one side of an argument. You might write a speech about a life choice, such as, "Abstinence Can Save Your Life," or getting involved in the community, such as "The Benefits of Volunteering."

Entertaining  speeches entertain your audience, and topics may not practical. Your speech topic could be something like, "Life Is Like a Dirty Dorm," or "Can Potato Peels Predict the Future?"

Special occasion  speeches entertain or inform your audience, like graduation speeches and toasts at celebrations.

Explore the different types of speeches and decide what speech type fits your assignment.

Craft a Creative Speech Introduction

Thoughtco.com / Grace Fleming

The introduction of the informative speech should contain an attention-grabber, followed by a statement about your topic. It should end with a strong transition into your body section.

As an example, consider a template for an informative speech called "African-American Heroines." The length of your speech will depend on the amount of time you have been allotted to speak.

The red section of the speech in the graphic provides the attention-grabber. It makes audience members think about what life would be like without civil rights. The last sentence states directly the purpose of the speech and leads into the speech body, which provides more details.

Determine the Flow of the Body of the Speech

Thoughtco.com / Grace Fleming

The body of your speech can be organized in a number of ways, depending on your topic. Suggested organization patterns include:

  • Chronological: Provides the order of events in time;
  • Spatial: Gives an overview of physical arrangement or design;
  • Topical: Presents information one subject at a time;
  • Causal: Shows cause-and-effect pattern.

The speech pattern illustrated in the image in this slide is topical. The body is divided into sections that address different people (different topics). Speeches typically include three sections (topics) in the body. This speech would continue with a third section about Susie King Taylor.

Writing a Memorable Speech Conclusion

The conclusion of your speech should restate the main points you covered in your speech and end with a memorable statement. In the sample in this graphic, the red section restates the overall message you wanted to convey: that the three women you've mentioned had strength and courage, despite the odds they faced.

The quote is an attention-grabber since it is written in colorful language. The blue section ties the entire speech together with a small twist.

Address These Key Objectives

Whatever type of speech you decide to write, find ways to make your words memorable. Those elements include:

  • Clever quotes
  • Amusing stories   with a purpose
  • Meaningful transitions
  • A good ending

The structure of how to write your speech is just the start. You'll also need to finesse the speech a bit. Start by paying attention to your audience and their interests. Write the words you'll speak with passion and enthusiasm, but you also want your listeners to share that enthusiasm. When writing your attention-grabbing statements, make sure you are writing what will get their attention, not just yours.

Study Famous Speeches

Gain inspiration from others' speeches. Read famous speeches and look at the way they are constructed. Find things that stand out and figure out what makes it interesting. Oftentimes, speechwriters use rhetorical devices to make certain points easy to remember and to emphasize them. 

Get to the Point Quickly

Remember to begin and end your speech with something that will gain and hold the attention of your audience. If you spend too much time getting into your speech, people will zone out or start checking their phones. If you get them interested immediately, they will be more likely to stick with you until the end.

Keep It Conversational

How you deliver the speech is also important. When you  give the speech , think about the tone you should use, and be sure to write the speech in the same flow that you'd use in conversations. A great way to check this flow is to practice reading it out loud. If you stumble while reading or it feels monotone, look for ways to jazz up the words and improve the flow. 

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Speech Writing

Speech Examples

Barbara P

20+ Outstanding Speech Examples for Your Help

Published on: Oct 21, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 2, 2023

speech examples

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Public speaking can be daunting for students. They often struggle to start, engage the audience, and be memorable. It's a fear of forgetting words or losing the audience's interest.

This leads to anxiety and self-doubt. Students wonder, "Am I boring them? Will they remember what I say? How can I make my speech better?"

The solution lies in speech examples. In this guide, we'll explore these examples to help students create captivating and memorable speeches with confidence.

So, keep reading to find helpful examples!

On This Page On This Page

Speech Examples 

Talking in front of a bunch of audiences is not as easy as it seems. But, if you have some good content to deliver or share with the audience, the confidence comes naturally.

Before you start writing your speech, it is a good idea that you go through some good speech samples. The samples will help to learn how to start the speech and put information into a proper structure. 

Speech Examples for Students 

Speech writing is a huge part of academic life. These types of writing help enhance the creative writing skills of students.

Here is an amazing farewell speech sample for students to learn how to write an amazing speech that will captivate the audience.

Below, you will find other downloadable PDF samples.

Speech Examples for Students

Every school and college has a student council. And every year, students elect themselves to be a part of the student council. It is mandatory to impress the student audience to get their votes. And for that, the candidate has to give an impressive speech. 

Here are some speech examples pdf for students.

Speech Examples For Public Speaking

Speech Examples About Yourself

Speech Examples Short

Speech Examples For College Students

Speech For Student Council

Speech Examples Introduction

Speech Example For School

Persuasive Speech Examples

The main purpose of a speech is to persuade the audience or convince them of what you say. And when it comes to persuasive speech , the sole purpose of speech becomes more specific.

Persuasive Speech Example

Informative Speech Examples

Informative speeches are intended to inform the audience. These types of speeches are designed to provide a detailed description of the chosen topic. 

Below we have provided samples of informative speech for you.

Informative Speech Example

Informative Speech Sample

Entertainment Speech Examples

Entertainment speeches are meant to entertain the audience. These types of speeches are funny, as well as interesting. The given speech samples will help you in writing an entertaining speech.

Entertainment Speech Example

Entertainment Speech Sample

Argumentative Speech Examples

Making a strong argument that is capable of convincing others is always difficult. And, when it comes to making a claim in an argumentative speech, it becomes more difficult. 

Check out the argumentative speech sample that demonstrates explicitly how an argumentative speech needs to be written.

Argumentative Speech Example

Demonstration Speech Examples

The demonstrative speeches are intended to demonstrate or describe the speech topic in depth. Get inspired by the demonstrative speech sample given below and write a captivating demonstrative speech.

Demonstration Speech Example

Demonstration Speech Sample

Motivational Speech Examples

Motivational speeches are designed to motivate the audience to do something. Read out the sample motivational speech given below and learn the art of motivational speech writing.

Impromptu Speech Examples

Impromptu speech writing makes you nervous as you are not good at planning and organization?

Check out the sample impromptu speech and learn to make bullet points of your thoughts and plan your speech properly.

Graduation Speech Examples

Are you graduating soon and need to write a graduation farewell speech?

Below is a sample graduation speech for your help. 

Wedding Speech Examples

“My best friend’s wedding is next week, and I’m the maid of honor. She asked me to give the maid of honor speech, but I’m not good at expressing emotions. I’m really stressed. I don’t know what to do.”

If you are one of these kinds of people who feel the same way, this sample is for you. Read the example given below and take help from it to write a special maid of honor speech.

Best Man Speech Examples

Father of The Bride Speech Example

Speech Essay Example

A speech essay is a type of essay that you write before writing a proper speech. It helps in organizing thoughts and information. 

Here is a sample of speech essays for you to understand the difference between speech format and speech essay format.

Tips to Write a Good Speech

Reading some famous and incredible sample speeches before writing your own speech is really a good idea. The other way to write an impressive speech is to follow the basic tips given by professional writers. 

  • Audience Analysis: Understand your audience's interests, knowledge, and expectations. Tailor your speech to resonate with them.
  • Clear Purpose: Define a clear and concise purpose for your speech. Ensure your audience knows what to expect right from the beginning.
  • Engaging Opening: Start with a captivating hook – a story, question, quote, or surprising fact to grab your audience's attention.
  • Main Message: Identify and convey your main message or thesis throughout your speech.
  • Logical Structure: Organize your speech with a clear structure, including an introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Transitions: Use smooth transitions to guide your audience through different parts of your speech.
  • Conversational Tone: Use simple, conversational language to make your speech accessible to everyone.
  • Timing: Respect the allocated time and write the speech accordingly. An overly long or short speech can diminish the audience's engagement.
  • Emotional Connection: Use storytelling and relatable examples to evoke emotions and connect with your audience.
  • Call to Action (if appropriate): Encourage your audience to take action, change their thinking, or ponder new ideas.
  • Practice Natural Pace: Speak at a natural pace, avoiding rushing or speaking too slowly.

So, now you know that effective communication is a powerful tool that allows you to inform, persuade, and inspire your audience. Throughout this blog, we've provided you with numerous examples and invaluable tips to help you craft a compelling speech. 

And for those moments when you require a professionally written speech that truly stands out, remember that our team is here to help. We can rescue you from writer's block and deliver an outstanding speech whenever you need it.

With our essay writing service , you can be confident in your ability to communicate your message effectively and leave a lasting impact. 

So, don't hesitate – request " write my speech " and buy a speech that will truly captivate your audience.

Barbara P (Literature, Marketing)

Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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7 Keys for Writing a Strong Speech

write a good speech

Average: 4 ( 1 vote)

7 Keys for Writing a Strong Speech for Public Speaking

If you need to deliver a speech soon, you may be feeling stressed. If it’s your first speech, you may not know how to approach the writing process at all, because speeches are different from written works. Before you prepare and deliver a speech, you should figure out what speeches are and how to make your speech successful.

When delivering a speech, you should aim to not only provide your audience with valuable information but also establish positive relationships. You should deliver facts and useful information, and you should also be sure to deliver it in an engaging way. Your posture, tone, and gestures are all important if you want to make a good impression.

Although public speaking is a challenge for many people, it’s still a very useful skill. It turns out that professionals with strong public speaking skills earn 10% more than their colleagues, but it is common knowledge that it takes a lot of time, which students, for example, don't have much. Every public speaking professional has often chosen to set aside time for improvement, which is why, being swamped with tons of homework, it was necessary to request writers to write my essay online and free up time for the opportunity to become a master of his craft. If you want to grow professionally, you should consider improving your public speaking skills, and this article will help you focus on the right aspects. We gathered the seven best tips for writing a strong speech that will impress your audience. First of all, let’s think about what makes a good speech."

What Makes a Good Speech

What Makes a Good Speech

No matter what your speech is about, you should ensure that your audience will understand you easily and that your speech will be engaging. Here are the main ingredients for writing a great speech.

Make it concise A good speech is concise. You don’t want to waste your audience’s time with lengthy introductions and unnecessary details. Of course, you may want to deliver a lot of information, but it doesn’t mean that your speech should be long. If you have control over the length of your speech, make it brief yet informative, presenting information in a condensed and well-structured way.

Make it clear Make sure that your audience will understand exactly what you say. Your speech should be easy to comprehend, so you should choose the right style of delivery. Don’t fill your speech with complex terms. Stick with simple language. A speech shouldn’t be as formal as a research paper, so use some informal phrases that will make your speech sound more natural.

Avoid bias Your speech must be as objective as possible. There’s nothing wrong with evoking emotions in your audience. Quite the opposite, if your audience reacts to your speech emotionally, the chances are that it’s good. However, you shouldn’t be overly emotional when delivering your speech, and you must ensure that all opinions that you present are unbiased and based on facts.

Keep it relevant Your speech should be interesting for the audience. You should ensure that there’s a need for your topic and that your message is perfectly relevant. Don’t try to impress your audience by providing lots of information that has nothing much to do with the main topic of your speech. Keep it focused.

Top 7 Tips for Writing a Strong Speech

Top 7 Tips for Writing a Strong Speech

1. Analyze your audience

Delivering a speech is a kind of interaction, and successful interaction is impossible without having a clear idea of who you’re talking with, what they can relate to, and what is interesting to them. You should also evaluate the size of your audience and the overall setting because these factors also have a direct influence on the nature of the interactions.

Consider the demographics of your audience: their age, gender, profession, etc. Think of what all members of your audience might have in common. Consider the reasons why they are present and want to listen to your speech in the first place. What do these people need? Do they need help with decision-making? Do they need information? What do they expect from you? 

“Speakers 101: How to wow your audience” : 60-second summary

2. Consider the format and venue and prepare accordingly

Consider the reason why your audience has gathered to listen to your speech. Knowing the occasion, you’ll be able to prepare properly and improve the relevance of your speech, addressing the circumstances. Think of how much time you will have, what the format of the event is and how formal it is, as well as what tools will be available.

How to Grab and Keep Your Online Audience’s Attention

3. Avoid fillers

This might be one of the most difficult things to do because almost all people tend to use fillers like “uh” or “umm,” especially when they are a little stressed out. Such vocal placeholders can distract your audience from your message and have a negative impact on your credibility. Fillers become more and more obvious (and therefore annoying) every time you repeat them, so we recommend that you pay attention to the way you speak from the very beginning.

If avoiding fillers is especially difficult for you, you can ask for help. When rehearsing your speech, ask a friend or someone who helps you prepare the speech to stop you every time you add another “umm”. This way, you will know how often you use fillers, and what parts of your speech need more attention. Because on your own, you’re not even going to be aware of your use of fillers most of the time.

Stop “Um-ing” (and using other fillers)

4. Be confident

Don’t start your presentation with “I’m so nervous.” You don’t need to be nervous and nobody will find out that you’re nervous because you won’t give them any reasons to think so. You will deliver your well-prepared speech easily, with no fillers and no other problems. You will manage to do it easily because you will prepare, rehearse your speech, and talk about things your audience is interested in.

World of Speakers E.37: Angela Lussier | Gaining confidence to get on stage and get paid

5. Keep it simple

Don’t try to impress your audience with complex terms and complicated sentences. First, a successful speech must be easy to understand. Second, delivering a speech isn’t academic writing, so it enables you to choose a less formal tone. It means that when writing a speech you should approach the writing process in a different way than when writing academic papers. If you need help with the style and tone of your writing, you can order writing assistance from the Best Writers Online and choose experienced writers on platforms like Online Writers Rating or Writing Judge .

4 simple ways to improve your talks

6. Connect with the whole audience

No matter how big your audience is, it’s a group of individuals, and if possible, you should connect with each and every one of them. Therefore, we recommend that you use body language to keep your speech authentic, and also maintain eye contact with members of the audience. You should make your speech as engaging as possible.

Walk around and show some energy so that your audience won’t feel bored. This way, it will be much easier for you to keep their attention. Look at different members of your audience and don’t forget about those who sit at the back.

Presenting complex data? Engage your audience with these 10 tips

7. Prepare a strong introduction

The introduction is one of the most important factors that determine the success of your speech. You should use your introduction to grab attention and help your audience immediately understand why they should listen to you. Your introduction should be brief and interesting. For example, consider beginning with a short relevant story, a staggering fact, a controversial statement, or a meaningful question.

6 Best Persuasion Techniques That You Can Use in Your Speeches

Wrapping Up

Many people worry when they need to deliver a speech, but the truth is that if you prepare well, you don’t need to worry. Think about your audience, plan and rehearse your speech, and make it engaging. Developing strong public speaking skills may take some time, but practice makes perfect.

Disclaimer: this article includes a paid product promotion.

How to Properly Write a Review of a Speech

How to Properly Write a Review of a Speech

Business Presentations

The Importance of Physical and Mental Preparedness in Business Presentations

write a good speech

5 Common Public Speaking Mistakes and How to Overcome Them

  • Speech Topics For Kids
  • How To Write A Speech

How to Write a Speech: A Guide to Enhance Your Writing Skills

Speech is a medium to convey a message to the world. It is a way of expressing your views on a topic or a way to showcase your strong opposition to a particular idea. To deliver an effective speech, you need a strong and commanding voice, but more important than that is what you say. Spending time in preparing a speech is as vital as presenting it well to your audience.

Read the article to learn what all you need to include in a speech and how to structure it.

Table of Contents

  • Self-Introduction

The Opening Statement

Structuring the speech, choice of words, authenticity, writing in 1st person, tips to write a speech, frequently asked questions on speech, how to write a speech.

Writing a speech on any particular topic requires a lot of research. It also has to be structured well in order to properly get the message across to the target audience. If you have ever listened to famous orators, you would have noticed the kind of details they include when speaking about a particular topic, how they present it and how their speeches motivate and instill courage in people to work towards an individual or shared goal. Learning how to write such effective speeches can be done with a little guidance. So, here are a few points you can keep in mind when writing a speech on your own. Go through each of them carefully and follow them meticulously.

Self Introduction

When you are writing or delivering a speech, the very first thing you need to do is introduce yourself. When you are delivering a speech for a particular occasion, there might be a master of ceremony who might introduce you and invite you to share your thoughts. Whatever be the case, always remember to say one or two sentences about who you are and what you intend to do.

Introductions can change according to the nature of your target audience. It can be either formal or informal based on the audience you are addressing. Here are a few examples.

Addressing Friends/Classmates/Peers

  • Hello everyone! I am ________. I am here to share my views on _________.
  • Good morning friends. I, _________, am here to talk to you about _________.

Addressing Teachers/Higher Authorities

  • Good morning/afternoon/evening. Before I start, I would like to thank _______ for giving me an opportunity to share my thoughts about ________ here today.
  • A good day to all. I, __________, on behalf of _________, am standing here today to voice out my thoughts on _________.

It is said that the first seven seconds is all that a human brain requires to decide whether or not to focus on something. So, it is evident that a catchy opening statement is the factor that will impact your audience. Writing a speech does require a lot of research, and structuring it in an interesting, informative and coherent manner is something that should be done with utmost care.

When given a topic to speak on, the first thing you can do is brainstorm ideas and pen down all that comes to your mind. This will help you understand what aspect of the topic you want to focus on. With that in mind, you can start drafting your speech.

An opening statement can be anything that is relevant to the topic. Use words smartly to create an impression and grab the attention of your audience. A few ideas on framing opening statements are given below. Take a look.

  • Asking an Engaging Question

Starting your speech by asking the audience a question can get their attention. It creates an interest and curiosity in the audience and makes them think about the question. This way, you would have already got their minds ready to listen and think.

  • Fact or a Surprising Statement

Surprising the audience with an interesting fact or a statement can draw the attention of the audience. It can even be a joke; just make sure it is relevant. A good laugh would wake up their minds and they would want to listen to what you are going to say next.

  • Adding a Quote

After you have found your topic to work on, look for a quote that best suits your topic. The quote can be one said by some famous personality or even from stories, movies or series. As long as it suits your topic and is appropriate to the target audience, use them confidently.  Again, finding a quote that is well-known or has scope for deep thought will be your success factor.

To structure your speech easily, it is advisable to break it into three parts or three sections – an introduction, body and conclusion.

  • Introduction: Introduce the topic and your views on the topic briefly.
  • Body: Give a detailed explanation of your topic. Your focus should be to inform and educate your audience on the said topic.
  • Conclusion:  Voice out your thoughts/suggestions. Your intention here should be to make them think/act.

While delivering or writing a speech, it is essential to keep an eye on the language you are using. Choose the right kind of words. The person has the liberty to express their views in support or against the topic; just be sure to provide enough evidence to prove the discussed points. See to it that you use short and precise sentences. Your choice of words and what you emphasise on will decide the effect of the speech on the audience.

When writing a speech, make sure to,

  • Avoid long, confusing sentences.
  • Check the spelling, sentence structure and grammar.
  • Not use contradictory words or statements that might cause any sort of issues.

Anything authentic will appeal to the audience, so including anecdotes, personal experiences and thoughts will help you build a good rapport with your audience. The only thing you need to take care is to not let yourself be carried away in the moment. Speak only what is necessary.

Using the 1st person point of view in a speech is believed to be more effective than a third person point of view. Just be careful not to make it too subjective and sway away from the topic.

  • Understand the purpose of your speech: Before writing the speech, you must understand the topic and the purpose behind it. Reason out and evaluate if the speech has to be inspiring, entertaining or purely informative.
  • Identify your audience: When writing or delivering a speech, your audience play the major role. Unless you know who your target audience is, you will not be able to draft a good and appropriate speech.
  • Decide the length of the speech: Whatever be the topic, make sure you keep it short and to the point. Making a speech longer than it needs to be will only make it monotonous and boring.
  • Revising and practicing the speech: After writing, it is essential to revise and recheck as there might be minor errors which you might have missed. Edit and revise until you are sure you have it right. Practise as much as required so you do not stammer in front of your audience.
  • Mention your takeaways at the end of the speech: Takeaways are the points which have been majorly emphasised on and can bring a change. Be sure to always have a thought or idea that your audience can reflect upon at the end of your speech.

How to write a speech?

Writing a speech is basically about collecting, summarising and structuring your points on a given topic. Do a proper research, prepare multiple drafts, edit and revise until you are sure of the content.

Why is it important to introduce ourselves?

It is essential to introduce yourself while writing a speech, so that your audience or the readers know who the speaker is and understand where you come from. This will, in turn, help them connect with you and your thoughts.

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How to write a speech

Did you know?

The longest speech ever recorded in the UK Parliament was delivered in the House of Commons in 1828 and lasted for six hours!

Introduction to how to write a speech

Speeches are a powerful way of expressing your ideas to others.

When writing a speech, you need to think carefully about how you structure it to make sure it is easy for listeners to follow.

In order for it to be engaging, you need to consider the language you use, ensuring that you target your audience and their interests. In fact, there are a range of language techniques that can help to make your speech even more powerful.

Video on how to write a speech

What is a speech.

A speech is a formal talk given to an audience. It has an aim and purpose – often to either inform and/or persuade, although it’s important to remember that some have other intentions too, eg to entertain.

Speeches are used in many different contexts. A bride or groom may give a speech at their wedding. A politician or activist may give a speech to inform others of the need for change, and persuade them of the right way to bring it about. A manager may need to give a speech to their employees or bosses. A speech may even be given when you leave school to reflect upon your time in education and inspire others to look to the future.

Speeches are not necessarily something we do every day, but speech writing is a useful skill to have.

What is the most common purpose of a speech?

a) To inform and/or persuade b) To entertain and/or amuse c) To advise and/or describe

Answer: a) To inform and/or persuade

Famous speeches

Throughout history, speeches have had a massive impact on social change and political decisions. Famous speeches that are credited as having helped change the world include:

‘I Have a Dream’ by Martin Luther King Jr in 1963. It was given as part of the USA Civil Rights movement in order to help bring about racial equality.

‘We shall fight on the beaches’ by Winston Churchill in 1940. It was a speech delivered to MPs in the UK House of Commons, encouraging the nation to rise to the challenges of World War Two and not to give up hope of victory.

‘I am prepared to die’ by Nelson Mandela in 1964, given as part of the fight to end apartheid and bring about a free and equal society for both black and white people in South Africa.

‘Freedom or Death’ by Emmeline Pankhurst in 1913 was a speech given as part of the fight for women’s right to vote.

In more recent times, we have seen a number of celebrities give speeches on a range of social, political and environmental issues. For instance:

Emma Watson’s ‘HeForShe’ speech given at the United Nations Headquarters as part of the UN campaign to end global gender inequality.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s speech on climate change at the opening of the 2014 UN Climate Summit.

There are also wide ranging TED Talks that are now available on almost any topic imaginable that have gone on to inform, persuade and inspire others around the world.

What issues do you think speeches most commonly given about?

a) Personal and family issues b) Social and political issues c) Financial issues

Answer: b) Social and political issues.

How to structure a speech

The opening.

Start with an opening that hooks your audience before making the overall topic of your speech clear. Get their attention and prepare them to focus on the words that will follow. For example, you could use:

  • A powerful image: ‘Imagine a huge clock - the slow, steady tick filling this room. Counting away the seconds and minutes we have left to act.’
  • A shocking or surprising fact: ‘Recently, I found out that up to one million species of plants and animals are threatened with extinction at this very moment.’
  • A rhetorical question: ‘Who wouldn't want to be a millionaire?’

Think carefully about how you want your audience to feel. A shocking fact may work well for some topics or audiences but a powerful image, for instance, may be more appropriate for others.

The main body of your speech

Having a simple structure to the main part of your speech is important to help the audience follow your points and ideas. Think about which points are more important and focus on reinforcing them. It is a good idea to put the most important points near the beginning of the speech, making sure they are in a logical order. Include the most important supporting examples and facts, but don’t overload the speech with too much detail.

Which sentence is the 'hook' in this paragraph?

Did you know that women make up more than two-thirds of the world's 796 million illiterate people? This means that the majority of the women in the world still cannot read or write to a functioning level. As a consequence of this, many women can only get low-paying jobs (if they are employed at all), meaning that, globally, there are a higher percentage of women who are suffering from poverty and starvation.

The rhetorical question 'Did you know that women make up more than two-thirds of the world's 796 million illiterate people?' is the hook in this paragraph. It asks the reader or listener a question that gets them thinking and wanting to know more.

Engaging language techniques

Think carefully about your audience . Choose language that will engage your specific listeners. A speech to a group of teenagers may use very different language compared to a speech given to a group of local politicians.

Think about the purpose of your speech. Are you hoping to persuade, inform, advise, entertain or argue? Many speeches will have more than one purpose. Ensure that you remain focussed on the purpose(s) you are trying to achieve.

There are a number of language techniques and rhetorical devices which can be used to keep listeners engaged during a speech and make points memorable. For example:

  • Tricolon (also known as Rule of Three or Triples): Three words or phrases in a row within a sentence to emphasise a positive or negative point.
  • Hyperbole : Exaggerated statements or claims for emphasis.
  • Emotive language : Words and phrases deliberately and intentionally used to make your reader feel certain emotions (eg sadness, worry, urgency etc).
  • Expert quote : A quotation taken from an expert in the topic about which you are speaking and which supports the point you are making, giving it more authority.
  • Imperative : A command or direct instruction.
  • Rhetorical question : A question asked for effect without the expectation of an answer.
  • Repetition : A key word or phrase said more than once in order to reinforce a point.
  • Statistic : A set of figures or a percentage used to demonstrate a point, giving it more authority.

Powerful conclusions

It can be useful to include phrases directed at the audience that highlight you’re ending the speech:

  • ‘I hope these ideas I’ve shared today will fill your thoughts on the way home. It is important that we…’
  • ‘My final message to you is…’

‘In conclusion, it is clear that…’

Or you may want to finish your speech with a powerful image, question or memorable idea:

  • ‘You hold our fragile future in your hands – don’t break it.’
  • ‘Do we really want to be responsible for the destruction of our environment?’

‘When all is said and done, will you have said more than you have done?’

And finally…

Don’t forget to thank your audience for giving you their time!

  • ‘Thank you all for listening today.’

Which part of the following paragraph that clearly signals this is the ending of the speech to the audience?

The point of no return regarding climate change is just around the corner. It is time for us to act before it is too late. As you leave here today, leave with at least one idea regarding how you can cut your carbon emissions and put it into practice. You can make a difference. Together, we can be the difference.

Answer: As you leave here today, leave with at least one idea regarding how you can cut your carbon emissions and put it into practice.

An effective speech takes careful planning. Even the most powerful politicians who seem to be speaking spontaneously may have spent a lot of time preparing what to say. What you say, the order in which you say it, and the techniques you use to get your points across will all add impact to your speech.

Focus on what you want the audience to know and how you want them to feel at the end of the speech.

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Tips and Strategies for Writing Quality Speeches

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Famous Lines from Famous Speeches by Famous Figures

  • “We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.” -The Decision to go the Moon by John F. Kennedy, 1961
  • “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.” -I Have A Dream by Martin Luther King, 1963
  • “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war.” Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln, 1863
  • “Such laughter is worse than the crackling of thorns under a pot, for it denotes not merely the vacant mind, but the heart in which high emotions have been choked before they could grow to fruition.” -The Man with the Muck-rake by Theodore Roosevelt, 1906
  • “Someone will say: Yes, Socrates, but cannot you hold your tongue, and then you may go into a foreign city, and no one will interfere with you? Now I have great difficulty in making you understand my answer to this. For if I tell you what to do as you say would be a disobedience to the God, and therefore that I cannot hold my tongue, you will not believe that I am serious; and if I say again that daily to discourse about virtue, and of those other things about which you hear me examining myself and others, is the greatest good of man, and that the unexamined life is not worth living, you are still less likely to believe me.” – Apology speech by Socrates, 399 B.C.

Speechwriting in Perspective: A Brief Guide to Effective and Persuasive Communication

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Use this Online Speech Generator to Help You Quickly Create a Good Speech

How to use this tool.

  • Select what you would like. To generate free speech topics or free speech content.
  • Select the type of speech e.g. "Explanatory", "Motivational".
  • Enter your speech topic.
  • Enter the additional instructions for better results.
  • Click "Generate Speech" and wait 1 minute to get the speech.
  • You can generate again when you are not satisfied with the speech or the topics.

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To generate speech essays, enter your prompt, and the tool will generate a speech essay. After the tool has generated the speech, you don't have to download the speech; you copy and paste it into the documents and make the necessary edits to suit what you were looking for.

You can also hire our speech homework helpers to help you craft a great speech that will move your audience.

Benefits of Using Our Speech Maker

Our online speech generator has several advantages. They include:

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What Makes a Good Speech

The following are the major components of a good speech:

  • It should be concise . You should not take much time with lengthy introductions and irrelevant details.
  • It should be clear . Your speech should be easy for the audience to comprehend and understand. So, avoid complex terms and pick the right delivery style.
  • Avoid bias. Your speech should be objective. Avoid being over-emotional, base your opinions on facts, and avoid biased opinions.
  • It should be relevant. Your speech topic should be perfectly relevant and interesting to your audience. Avoid much information that does not relate to the main topic.

Good Speech Examples

  • Organ Donation Persuasive Speech
  • Informative Speech about Stress Management
  • Informative Speech about Stress Management among Students
  • Speech on the Importance of Reading

How to Choose a Good Speech Topic

  • Specify Your Goals. Establish the occasion and the message you want to convey to your audience.
  • Assess Your Audience. Research your audience's knowledge, interests, needs, and background.
  • Think of What You Can Offer Your Audience . Avoid shortlisted topics which you are not passionate about. And then ensure you have enough resources and knowledge on the topic you have chosen.

Random Speech Topics

Informative speech topics.

  • Evolution of the human species
  • Are male victims of domestic violence as well?
  • Should gay couples be allowed to adopt?
  • A guide for creating a strong profile on LinkedIn
  • The drawbacks of vegan diets

Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Foreign labor slows down the economy
  • Voting rights should not be universal
  • Google is the death of libraries
  • Government should regulate internet usage
  • Fashion is an important part of society

Informative vs Persuasive Speeches

An informative speech is a speech where the speaker is a professional and intends to transfer their knowledge or inform the audience about a specific topic. In a persuasive speech, the speaker aims to persuade the listeners to change their point of view.,

  • An informative speech aims to deliver new information, while a persuasive speech aims to convince the audience to believe or do something specific.
  • The informative speech presents facts and information to the audience, while the persuasive speech is based on logic and emotions.
  • Informative speech does not rely on emotions to motivate the audience, but emotions are highly applicable in persuasive speeches.
  • In an informative speech, the speaker acts as a teacher, while in persuasive speeches, the speaker is the leader.

No matter the type of speech you are writing, you must identify the purpose and maintain the focus. For informative speeches, you should remain objective and unbiased and present facts only. In a persuasive speech , you aim to persuade the audience to agree with your opinion. Use our speech generator to craft speech in any category.

Our words to time tool will help you estimate the time it will take to deliver your speech.

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454 Persuasive Speech Topics: Easy, Fun, & Controversial Ideas for Students

454 Persuasive Speech Topics: Easy, Fun, & Controversial Ideas for Students

Every day, we create and consume persuasive messages. For example, when we argue about what movie to watch or where to go on the weekend. But how often do we pause to consider how we form our arguments or perceive the ones we hear from others? Public speaking on persuasive topics provides us the chance to do so.

Persuasive speeches do not inform the audience on the issue but rather convince them to take action or change their attitudes. In this article, we’ll discuss the structure of the persuasive speech. You’ll also find many compelling topics for public speaking that can come in handy and motivate the audience to change!

🔝 Top 10 Persuasive Speech Topics in 2023

✍️ persuasive speech outline, 😊 easy persuasive speech topics.

  • 🎒 Speech Topics for High School
  • 🎓 Speech Topics for College

⭐ Good Persuasive Speech Topics

💊 medical persuasive speech topics.

  • 🍃 Environmental Speech Topics

⚖️ Ethical Persuasive Speech Topics

➡️ problem solution persuasive speech topics, 😜 funny persuasive speech topics, 🤔 controversial persuasive speech topics, 📝 persuasive essay topics, ❓ persuasive speech faq, 🔗 references.

  • Why should society accept the AI revolution?
  • Free education should be accessible to everyone.
  • Social media impacts social behavior.
  • Sports should be a part of children’s life.
  • The death penalty should be canceled.
  • Fashion and style reveal the inner world of the person.
  • Every country should have open borders.
  • Teenagers are addicted to Instagram and Snapchat.
  • Solo travel is the best method to explore oneself.
  • Should teachers teach kids in middle school about sex?

Delivering persuasive speeches is not that easy. It usually requires thorough preparation and thoughtful structuring to convey your message clearly and motivate the audience to make a move. We have prepared a detailed outline to help you create an effective persuasive speech. Check out the table below to learn its key components!

  • Money cannot buy love and loyalty.
  • Higher education should be free for everyone .
  • Online communication is better than offline.
  • Students should not wear the uniform .
  • Use of cell phones while driving should be banned .
  • Youngsters should respect their elders.
  • Why should lying be banned?
  • Gay marriage should not be legal .
  • Selfies in tourist locations should be taxed.
  • iOS is better in use than Android .
  • Should the federal government legalize the use of marijuana ?
  • Gender should not matter in the sports industry .
  • Why should people colonize Mars ?
  • Why should same-sex marriage be a norm ?
  • People should visit dentists several times per year.
  • Educational institutions should promote inclusivity .
  • Should societies impose monogamy ?
  • Adventures are better than routine life.
  • Memes are a quick way to brighten up the mood.
  • Why humans should not visit Mars .
  • Offensive jokes should be forbidden.
  • Nightclubbing is a waste of time.
  • Tattoos should be considered fine art .
  • Why should Halloween as the event be canceled?
  • A good sense of humor helps make new acquaintances.
  • Why celebrities should avoid political topics .
  • Why does time pass faster on vacation?
  • Life exists after death.
  • Why celebrities should be apositive role model .
  • Vaping should be banned in public places.

🎒 Persuasive Speech Topics for High School

  • Dating a coworker should be illegal.
  • Should parents spank their children ?
  • Jealousy destroys all types of relationships.
  • Procrastination plays a vital role in the working process.
  • Should we restrict the Internet usage by children ?
  • Why shouldn’t parents force their kids to go to church?
  • Small businesses should be protected by law.
  • Should US public schools have a longer year ?
  • Why are online bloggers beneficial to society?
  • Owning a business leads people to feel lonely and isolated.
  • Adult children should support elderly parents .
  • Bitcoin should be used as legal currency.
  • Technology doesn’t make us lazy.
  • Why you should not have grades in school .
  • Why should the death penalty still be used as a punishment?
  • People should buy only electric vehicles .
  • Cigarette manufacturers should be prohibited .
  • Kids under the age of 13 should have an 8 PM curfew .
  • Police brutality against black people should be punished.
  • Censorship issue: books should never be banned .
  • People should have hobbies to be satisfied with life.
  • Having a role model is essential for constant self-improvement.
  • Why should marriage be based on love and not arranged ?
  • Why is creativity crucial in the SMM industry ?
  • The payment for commonalities should be decreased.
  • Why should evolution be taught in schools ?
  • Planning prevents procrastination.
  • Listening to music while driving decreases the rate of car crashes.
  • English language learners should be immersed in English .
  • Lotteries should be illegal, the same as gambling and casinos.

🎓 Persuasive Speech Topics for College

  • The government should take serious measures to prevent the issue of child pornography .
  • Should Mormon children be returned to their homes ?
  • Enormous coffee consumption can cause anxiety or panic attacks.
  • The three-day weekends can increase work productivity .
  • All police officers should wear a body camera .
  • Why texting on the road is the leading cause of car accidents?
  • The number of ads on the billboards should be cut.
  • Should public servants have the right to strike ?
  • Democracy as the government structure has a lot of pitfalls.
  • Foreign aid from the United States should aim to support global peace.
  • Why juveniles should be tried as adults .
  • Affirmative action should be taken to redress historical and ingrained inequalities.
  • The government should promote the spread of charter schools .
  • Should casinos be legal in Texas ?
  • The Black Lives Matter movement has played a vital role in preventing vigilante violence.
  • COVID-19 vaccines should be mandatory to protect people at risk.
  • Should parents have the right to choose their children based on genetics ?
  • Genetic engineering can be used for the treatment of genetic diseases.
  • White nationalism should be canceled.
  • Should guns be banned from college campuses ?
  • Why does routine make people feel healthier and more energetic?
  • Food preferences have the power to connect people around the world.
  • Individuals should not be allowed to sell their body organs .
  • Positive childhood memories play a crucial role in a person’s development.
  • Each individual should have a sense of purpose.
  • Should aid to developing countries be stopped ?
  • Border security should be a priority in ensuring national safety.
  • Extreme weather disasters are the consequences of global warming.
  • Should we rely on eye-witness testimonies to identify crime-suspects ?
  • Why does applying sunscreen reduce the risks of skin cancer ?

Whether you want to change the opinion of your audience or motivate them to action, here are some fascinating and thought-provoking topics that are perfect for persuasive speeches:

  • Year-round school is better for academic success .
  • Should academic achievement be a primary concern for college admission ?
  • The use of fossil fuels should be banned to stop global warming.
  • The drinking age should be raised to 25 years old.
  • Why should marijuana be legalized and crack or cocaine remain illegal ?
  • Abortion should be legalized at the federal level.
  • Why is a strong middle class crucial to economic development?
  • Should social norms change at the brink of the new era ?
  • Prisoners should be allowed to vote after being acquitted.
  • Violent video games promote aggressive behavior in teenagers.
  • Why should bullies be expelled from school ?
  • Parents should not track the location of their children.
  • Why is conflict necessary for change in a relationship?
  • Drinking age should be lowered to 18 years .
  • The prices of pharmaceutical drugs should be affordable for elders.

Persuasive Speech Topics about Music

  • Every person who has good hearing may sing.
  • Discusison of why we should keep vocal fry .
  • Why does classical music still play a vital role in music art?
  • The lyrics of a song should elicit emotions in the audience.
  • Legalizing free downloads of music and movies .
  • Music is an effective way to communicate with the masses.
  • Pirating music is a severe danger to the country’s economy.
  • Can music be an enhancement to education ?
  • Rap music has a bad influence on people’s behavior.
  • Music should be an anchor to positive emotions.
  • How does music reinforce stereotypes ?
  • Songs with violent lyrics should be banned for teenagers under 18.
  • Music has the potential to be the most effective therapy for mental illnesses.
  • Does music distract students or help them ?
  • Why should patriotic songs inspire people to feel passionate about their country?

Sports Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Coaches should be more active in athlete health management.
  • Should athletes be held to a higher moral standard ?
  • Why should hunting animals be banned as a sport in all countries?
  • Extreme sports with severe consequences should be outlawed.
  • Should football be banned for being too violent and dangerous ?
  • Heavy training and burnout put young athletes at risk of serious injury.
  • Alcohol and tobacco advertising during athletic events should be forbidden.
  • Reasons why kids should not play football .
  • The success of the football team depends on coaching skills.
  • College athletic teams should have sponsorship from the government.
  • College athletes should not be paid .
  • Terrorist countries should not be allowed to host international sporting activities.
  • Why do stress and anxiety make athletes more vulnerable to injuries?
  • Should Russian athletes be allowed to play in tournaments ?
  • The pay for men and women athletes should be equal.

Social Media Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Social media dating should be treated more seriously.
  • Should social media be banned ?
  • Social media is to blame for the proliferation of online sexual exploitation.
  • Why does Internet communication impact politics and social awareness?
  • YouTube comments: users should have a choice .
  • Instagram and TikTok make people more selfish.
  • The use of social networks should be banned for elementary school students.
  • Lemon coffee trend on TikTok shouldn’t be done .
  • Social media causes severe mental disorders.
  • Why do social networks lead to problems with self-esteem ?
  • Should online shaming be considered a problem ?
  • Instagram is the best place to earn money in the modern world.
  • The key benefit of social media is the freedom of speech .
  • Social media for children: threat or opportunity ?
  • People should be more cautious with using social networks.

The field of medicine provides many intriguing and interesting persuasive speech topics for students! You can check some of them below:

  • Healthcare should be a right, not a privilege.
  • Should parents avoid vaccinating their children ?
  • Why should health insurance cover dentistry?
  • Artificial intelligence positively influences the healthcare industry.
  • Mandatory overtime for nurses should be eliminated .
  • Medical aid for dying should be legalized.
  • Organ donation and transportation should not be forbidden.
  • Why we should all be wearing face masks .
  • Marijuana should be legalized for medical purposes .
  • COVID-19 vaccination protects children and adolescents.
  • Should we withhold life support ?
  • Healthy eating habits positively impact physical health.
  • E-cigarettes lead to lung cancer and cardiovascular disease.
  • Should physician-assisted suicide be legal ?
  • The quality of prenatal and postnatal care should be improved.
  • Animal testing in medical research should be canceled.
  • Should COVID-19 vaccines be mandatory ?
  • Sex education is crucial in preventing teenage pregnancy .
  • Childhood obesity comes from the lack of nutrition education in schools.
  • Should patients have access to truthful information ?
  • Regular medical checkups lower the chance of premature mortality.
  • People should regulate the amount of sugar intake to promote a healthy lifestyle.
  • Competence for nurses: why is it important ?

Mental Health Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Employers should create healthy work environments for their workforce.
  • Social media as a cause of anxiety and depression .
  • Children experience mental health issues less often than adults.
  • Stress at work leads to severe psychological issues.
  • Does social media use contribute to depression ?
  • Music therapy should be widely used in healing and recovery processes.
  • Implicit bias shapes the way medical providers interact with patients.
  • Hypnotherapy as an effective method for treating depression .
  • Regular sport and a healthy diet promote good mental well-being.
  • Why do open discussions on mental health help cope with anxiety?
  • Substance abuse: the cause of social problems .
  • Promoting a person’s social-emotional well-being leads to lower crime rates .
  • Raising awareness of mental health reduces suicide rates .
  • Why is anxiety not related to personal weakness ?
  • Mental healthcare professionals should encourage self-care to avoid burnout.

This image lists common myths about mental health.

Psychology Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the most effective method of treating people with PTSD .
  • Psychology: when we should trust our senses .
  • Why do family relationships affect behavior patterns in children?
  • Burnout at work is the leading cause of mental disorders.
  • Is creativity a modern panacea from boredom and depression ?
  • People should not work as psychologists without higher education.
  • The harm reduction treatment model is a great alternative to abstinence.
  • Is Islamic spirituality a key to psychological well-being ?
  • Why is it a bad idea for therapists to text clients?
  • The social pressure from peers leads to a mental breakdown.
  • Psychological testing: beneficial or harmful ?
  • War veterans should take therapy for PTSD.
  • Marketing firms use human behavior patterns to their advantage.
  • Psychology: does a criminal mind exist ?
  • Happy childhood does not guarantee good mental health.

🍃 Environmental Persuasive Speech Topics

The environment takes an important place in our lives. We can make beneficial changes and save the Earth for future generations by highlighting numerous persuasive environmental topics in our speeches! Here are some of the most relevant ones:

  • Eco-fashion is an effective way to save the Earth.
  • Clear cutting in rainforest should be limited .
  • Plastic pollution poses a danger to the marine ecosystem.
  • Why does overpopulation negatively impact the environment?
  • Seven things you should know about the eco-friendly bags .
  • Eco-tourism helps conserve natural resources and raise environmental consciousness.
  • People should care about e-waste in our digital age.
  • Reasons why plastic bags should be banned .
  • Why do plant-based diets positively affect people’s mental and physical health?
  • Rural development contributes to widespread pollution and wildfires.
  • Should the Green New Deal be embraced ?
  • Buying sustainable production has a positive effect on biodiversity promotion.
  • Quality of life highly depends on the quality of the environment.
  • Water recycling: why is it important ?
  • Every person should plant a tree beside the house.
  • Littering should be punished with heavy fines.
  • Renewable energy: why do we need it ?
  • Covid-19 has played an essential role in the environment’s recovery.
  • Developed countries are responsible for global warming .
  • Why hunting is environmentally beneficial .
  • We should aim toward a paperless society.
  • A carbon tax should be necessary to preserve the environment.
  • Biodiversity on the Earth: why is it crucial for the environment ?

This image shows environmental issues to argue about.

Persuasive Speech Topics about Food

  • Fast-food restaurants should ban the usage of palm oil.
  • Should Americans adopt a vegan lifestyle ?
  • Why should the use of chemicals in agriculture be decreased?
  • Factory farms increase the instance or exacerbation of asthma cases .
  • Should food manufacturers label all GMOs ?
  • Food waste significantly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions.
  • People should form mindful consumption habits and proper food storage techniques.
  • Eating home-cooked food is essential .
  • Seasonal eating has a positive impact on reducing transportation emissions.
  • Plastic food packaging should be banned around the world.
  • Is fast food really harmful and can it be healthy ?
  • The government should take water-saving measures at the national level.
  • Why can optimizing energy usage in food processing save the environment?
  • Genetically modified foods: how safe are they ?
  • A responsible food system contributes to the long-term health of our planet.

Persuasive Speech Topics About Animals

  • People should prioritize the protection of endangered species .
  • Animals should have the same rights as humans: pros and cons .
  • Zoos should be closed to prevent animal abuse.
  • Beauty companies that encourage animal testing should be banned.
  • Animal welfare: why animals should be treated with kindness and respect .
  • Why are animal sports banning campaigns ineffective?
  • Young kids should be taught how to take care of animals.
  • Save animals: experimentation should be stopped .
  • Spending time with pets reduces stress and depression.
  • Domestic animals should be vaccinated as necessary.
  • Animal use in scientific testing should be stopped .
  • Pets should be adopted from the shelter rather than bought in a shop.
  • Why should pets be microchipped?
  • Should animals be used for research ?
  • Flies, bees, and other insects are essential to the ecosystem.

Ethical persuasive speech topics provide a compelling platform for discussing our world’s moral issues and inspiring significant change. Below are the best persuasive speech topics on ethics themes that can come in handy!

  • People should live together before marriage.
  • Philosophy prospectus: why should we be moral ?
  • LGBT people should be permitted to serve in the military .
  • Why should suicide commitment be legal?
  • Should parents be responsible for children’s crimes ?
  • Vaccinations against infectious illnesses should be made mandatory in schools.
  • Why is lying appropriate when it comes down to survival?
  • Why should I be moral when it is not in my best interest to do so ?
  • A sugar tax can assist in reducing the spread of diet-related health issues.
  • People should be legally responsible for their moral decisions and actions.
  • Should Kant be criticized for his absolutism ?
  • Why should graffiti be considered art?
  • Wearing natural fur and leather is unethical in the modern world.
  • Should children be tried as adults for murder ?
  • Children should be protected from using inappropriate websites.
  • Each person should own a gun for personal protection.
  • Ethical dilemma: should gene editing be performed on human embryos ?
  • Kids should be taught ethics in elementary school.
  • Religious organizations should be required to pay taxes.
  • Should behavior be made illegal because it is considered immoral ?
  • Innovative gadgets make teenagers lazy and rude.
  • Terminally ill patients should have access to euthanasia .
  • Should the powerful have a right to rule over the weak ?

Business Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Harassment is one of the most significant ethical challenges in business .
  • Biometric security should be mainstream in firms .
  • Abuse of leadership negatively affects company development.
  • Why are transparency and trustworthiness crucial in business financial performance?
  • Should companies disclose key executives’ medical problems ?
  • Extraverts are worse entrepreneurs than introverts.
  • Companies should foremost create a good working environment for their employees.
  • Should companies engage corporate social responsibility ?
  • Smoke breaks should not be allowed during the working process.
  • Why is working for a rival a wise decision?
  • Should marketers test advertising ?
  • Political relationships should not be used for business development .
  • Free perks to employees positively influence overall productivity.
  • Why should businesses embrace remote work ?
  • Each business should take corporate social responsibility .

Political Persuasive Speech Topics

  • Psychological therapies should be government funded.
  • Should illegal immigrants be made legal citizens ?
  • Why is torture an inappropriate method to receive a confession in prison?
  • Welfare recipients should be obliged to submit to a drug test.
  • Why gun control laws should be scrapped .
  • Political corruption should be punished with the death penalty.
  • Why should the government fund partisan organizations?
  • Why should Bernie Sanders be a president ?
  • The voting age should be decreased to 16 years old.
  • Why is there never a good enough cause to declare war?
  • Military policy that should be changed .
  • Prostitution should be legalized and protected by the law.
  • Illegal immigration significantly impacts terrorism act rates.
  • Chinese one-child policy: why it should not be relaxed .
  • Health insurance should be mandatory by law.

Persuasive Speech Topics About Education

  • Teachers should use social networks to communicate with students.
  • Should Canada provide free tuition for university students ?
  • Why is higher education overrated?
  • Exams should no longer be used to assess the skills of students.
  • Why should vocabulary lessons be taught ?
  • Online learning is more effective than attending classes at school.
  • University bribes affect hardworking students.
  • Should stimulants be prescribed to boost grades ?
  • Why do teachers assist students in cheating during exams ?
  • Teachers’ preferential treatment in schools should be punished.
  • Should the US adopt the British tradition of a gap year ?
  • Parents and students should report bullying and cyberbullying cases.
  • Students should not be allowed to have their phones with them during school.
  • Should concealed handguns be allowed in Texas classrooms ?
  • Immigrants without documents should be permitted to attend public schools.

Problem-solution topics convince audiences to actively engage in discovering practical and effective answers to challenges affecting our society. Check out some ideas below!

  • How can we deal with climate change ?
  • Should Georgia legalize gambling to raise revenue ?
  • Maintaining peace and security is critical for poverty prevention.
  • Filtration and disinfection as methods to solve the water pollution issue.
  • Have “three-strikes” laws been effective and should they be continued ?
  • How can a rise in public awareness decrease human rights violation cases?
  • Taking baths as a way to reduce anxiety and stress.
  • Why should immigrants receive social services ?
  • How can the government solve the problem of wage inequality ?
  • Buying e-books as a way to protect the environment.
  • Where and how sex education should be conducted among the young people ?
  • Government sanctions are crucial to reducing child labor .
  • How can we provide adequate salaries for qualified teachers?
  • The Right-to-Die bill: why all states should pass it .
  • Interactive games as a way to increase attention in class.
  • International cooperation is vital to combat cyber threats .
  • Should the province of Nova Scotia increase its minimum wage ?
  • Donating as a method to reduce global poverty .
  • How to deal with misinformation and fake news in the digital age?
  • How should we deal with the rising cost of education ?
  • Planning strategies are essential to solve the problem of overpopulation.
  • How can gender inequality be stopped at school or the workplace?
  • Animal transplantation and commerce in organs should be used to reduce the shortage in organs .
  • Increasing access to cheap internet infrastructure as a way to narrow the digital gap.
  • How can we solve the problem of doping in sports ?
  • E-cigarettes smoking: threat or solution ?
  • Good school culture as a modern approach to reducing truancy .
  • Reading out loud helps improve the critical thinking of students .
  • Assisted suicide as a solution in end-of-life care .
  • How can we make the media ethical and responsible?

This image shows current problems with possible solutions.

Funny persuasive speech topics perform two functions: entertain and persuade the target audience. We have prepared a list of the cleverest ideas for you to use in your speech!

  • Video games should be considered a sport.
  • Should apartments ban dogs based on breed ?
  • Why is the Moon landing fake?
  • Eating dessert first positively impacts people’s well-being.
  • Feminism: how a man should look at a woman .
  • The homework for high school students should be canceled.
  • Laughing is the best therapy for depression.
  • Why should pitbulls not be banned ?
  • People in the future should have personal robots.
  • Why should children be allowed to choose their bedtime?
  • Should people under 18 get a tattoo ?
  • Instagram kills individuality in teenagers.
  • Why should schools have pizza breaks between classes?
  • Should plant-based dairy be labeled as milk ?
  • Parents should not be allowed to comment on their kids’ wardrobe choices.
  • The consumption of junk food should be controlled on the federal level.
  • The United States government should release more UFO information to the public .
  • Comic books should be used to teach Mathematics.
  • The mismatched socks impact academic performance during exams.
  • Should spamming be illegal ?
  • The government should create insurance for breakups.
  • The Loch Ness Monster should be protected from annoying tourists.
  • Should people be paid to stay healthy ?
  • Why can sarcastic jokes save the conversation?
  • Men should always go on compromise with their wives.
  • Gender stereotypes: should real men wear pink ?
  • Rap music provokes aggressive behavior among teens.
  • Why breaking up via social media should be illegal?
  • Online dating should not be classified as dating .
  • Binge-watching Netflix should be practiced during the lessons.

Controversial persuasive speech topics provoke listeners’ critical thinking and encourage dynamic discussion. Check the best persuasive speech topics on controversial themes below!

  • Why does a bad first date lead to a strong and long relationship?
  • Why should flogging be brought back ?
  • The dream job topic is the lightest way to talk about work.
  • Aliens should share their secret technologies with NATO.
  • Ukraine should not join the European Union .
  • Only intelligent speakers should have freedom of speech.
  • Atheism is not a religion but rather a philosophical position.
  • Should college education be free for all US citizens ?
  • Why is nuclear energy ingrained as part of the power grid in the US?
  • Terrorists are generally more sadistic than religious.
  • Why cameras should be placed in public places .
  • Everyone should be able to possess a gun .
  • Why is it crucial to be selfish from time to time?
  • Should schools distribute condoms ?
  • People should pass the test on political awareness before voting.
  • Gay people should be permitted to adopt children.
  • Should the sale of human organs be legalized ?
  • Why is feminism irrelevant in the 21st century?
  • Schools should provide free birth control for teenagers .
  • Should gay and lesbian couples be allowed to adopt ?
  • Children as young as 12 should be allowed to work.
  • Why should human cloning be allowed?
  • Should the US resume a millitary draft ?
  • The show The Kardashians is harming society.
  • Why are most conspiracy theories fake?
  • What should society censor ?
  • The Big Bang Theory movie deepens viewers’ knowledge of science.
  • McDonald’s should be opened in every town around the world.
  • Why should abortion be included in the national healthcare plan ?
  • Why is writing an autobiography a good idea?

Need to write a persuasive essay ? Do not panic! Here are some additional persuasive topics that you can use for your writing:

  • Negative news on TV increases the level of stress.
  • Should sex and violence be restricted on television ?
  • Leisure time should be spent with benefits for physical and mental health.
  • Daydreaming develops learning skills in students.
  • Why the government should not have bailed out banks .
  • Every person should be required to participate in national public service.
  • Cell phone radiation is hazardous to people’s health.
  • What qualities should a leader have ?
  • More money should be invested in space exploration .
  • Alternative medicine should be outlawed.
  • Mandatory job drug test should be allowed .
  • Why can stalkers be dangerous?
  • Parents should not buy a lot of candies for their children.
  • Which country should the US invest in, Australia or Mexico ?
  • Students should plant trees to contribute to a greener environment.
  • Why is your biggest failure the most beneficial lesson for you?
  • Why should we look at race when trying to understand fascism ?
  • Countries that started the wars should pay reparations .
  • Pineapple on a pizza should be canceled.
  • Why Guantanamo Bay should stay open .
  • Why should you and your parents never be friends on Instagram?
  • Starting a day by making a bed increases productivity during the day.
  • Why the Pantheon should be preserved .
  • TikTok is an entertaining social network as well as educational.
  • Using curse words should be taxed.
  • Should net neutrality be protected or discontinued ?
  • Dreaming is the first step in achieving the goal.
  • Stereotypes and biases are not appropriate in the modern world.
  • Should Turkey enter the European Union ?
  • Why are politics bad role models for children?

What Is a Persuasive Speech?

A persuasive speech is a type of communication with the audience where the speaker tries to persuade them by appealing to logic, ethics, or emotions. The speaker must provide clear arguments to back up their point of view. In contrast to informative speeches, persuasive speeches do not try to give information. Instead, they motivate audiences to think or behave differently.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Speech?

Various qualities characterize effective persuasive speeches:

  • Attention-grabbing introduction. Convincing speakers immediately draw the listener into their messages by starting with a brief intriguing statement supported by evidence.
  • Authority to speak. The audience usually heeds speakers’ messages if they establish their expertise and credibility.
  • The logical order. The speaker should put the arguments logically and sequentially to control the information flow.
  • Effective conclusion. The final part of the speech is the last chance to convince the audience, so it must summarize key points and include a call to action.

What to Write a Persuasive Speech on?

To find a perfect topic for your speech, follow the steps below:

  • Think of something that is important to you or has a life-changing effect.
  • Try to understand what makes you happy or angry about this theme.
  • Write down ways in which you can make a difference.

That’s it! Now you know which topic has the potential to inspire action or change among the target listeners!

What Are Good Persuasive Speech Topics?

If you want to rock the stage as a public speaker, aim at topics that are controversial and risky. Human cloning, polygamy, workplace romance, and abortion are just a few examples. Like no other, such topics provoke the audience to take action and change. In addition, they raise deep concern in listeners’ minds and show alternative viewpoints on the issue.

  • 110+ Controversial Debate Topics to Challenge Your Students | We Are Teachers
  • 100 Persuasive Essay Topics | ThoughtCo
  • Keeping Your Speech Moving | Stand Up, Speak Out
  • Persuasive Speeches | Public Speaking as Performance
  • Persuasive Speaking | University of Pittsburgh
  • Persuasive Speaking | Communication in the Real World
  • 105 Interesting Persuasive Speech Topics for Any Project | PrepScholar
  • Appendix A: Persuasive Speech Topic Ideas | Principles of Public Speaking
  • Top 10 Controversial Psychiatric Disorders | LiveScience
  • Mental Health Myths and Facts | SAMHSA
  • Select a Research Topic: Current Events and Controversial Issues | Southern Adventist University
  • Persuasive Speeches: What Are You Questioning? | UNC Greensboro
  • 100 Persuasive Speech Topics for Students | ThoughtCo
  • Persuasive Speech Topics on Relationships | Classroom
  • Unique Persuasive Speech Topics for College | YourDictionary
  • How to Slay Your Speech | University of Alaska Fairbanks
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How to Write a Poem: A Step-by-Step Guide

Lindsay Kramer

Poetry is . . . song lyrics without the music? Writing that rhymes? A bunch of comparisons and abstract imagery that feels like a code for the reader to decipher?

The answer to all of the above is yes, but poetry encompasses much more. Poetry is a broad literary category that covers everything from bawdy limericks to unforgettable song lyrics to the sentimental couplets inside greeting cards. Poetry’s lack of rules can make it feel hard to define but is also what makes poetry enjoyable for so many to write. 

If you’ve ever wondered how to write a poem, read on. Writing poetry doesn’t have to be daunting—we’re going to demystify the process and walk you through it, one step at a time.  

Write confidently Grammarly helps you choose the perfect words Write with Grammarly

What is a poem?

A poem is a singular piece of poetry. 

Poems don’t have to rhyme; they don’t have to fit any specific format; and they don’t have to use any specific vocabulary or be about any specific topic. But here’s what they do have to do: use words artistically by employing figurative language . With a poem, the form is as important as the function—perhaps even more so.

In contrast, prose is writing that follows the standard sentence and paragraph structure. Prose, while it takes many different forms and tones, largely mimics human speech patterns. 

The purpose of a poem

Poetry expresses emotions and conveys ideas, but that’s not all it can do. Poets tell stories, teach lessons, and even communicate hidden messages through poetry. When you listen to music with lyrics, you’re listening to poetry. 

When you’re writing poetry, keep your goal in mind. Are you writing to evoke emotion? To perform your poem at an open mic night? To get a good grade on your assignment? Although there aren’t any hard and fast rules for writing poetry, there are some fundamental guidelines to keep in mind: 

  • Show, don’t tell. The goal is to provoke an emotion in the reader.
  • Less can be more. While it’s perfectly acceptable to write long, flowery verse, using simple, concise language is also powerful. Word choice and poem length are up to you. 
  • It’s OK to break grammatical rules when doing so helps you express yourself.

Elements of poetry

The key elements that distinguish poetry from other kinds of literature include sound, rhythm, rhyme, and format. The first three of these are apparent when you hear poetry read aloud. The last is most obvious when you read poetry.

One thing poetry has in common with other kinds of literature is its use of literary devices. Poems, like other kinds of creative writing , often make use of allegories and other kinds of figurative language to communicate themes. 

In many cases, poetry is most impactful when it’s listened to rather than read. With this in mind, poets often create sound, whether to be pleasing, jarring, or simply highlight key phrases or images through words. Read this short poem “The Cold Wind Blows” by Kelly Roper aloud and listen to the sounds the letters and words make: 

Who knows why the cold wind blows

Or where it goes, or what it knows.

It only flows in passionate throes

Until it finally slows and settles in repose.

Do you hear the repeated “ose” sound and how it mimics the sound of wind gusts? Poets create sound in a variety of ways, like alliteration , assonance, and consonance. 

Poetry has rhythm. That’s what often makes it so attractive to set to music. 

A poem’s rhythmic structure is known as its meter . Meter refers to:

  • The number of syllables in each line
  • The stressed and unstressed syllables in each line 

These syllables are grouped together to form feet , units that make up a line of poetry. A foot is generally two or three syllables, and each combination of two or three stressed and unstressed syllables has a unique name. 

You probably recognize the term iambic pentameter from English class. It comes up a lot in high school English classes because Shakespeare wrote in it frequently, and Shakespeare is frequently read in high school English classes. An iamb is a two-syllable foot where the second syllable is stressed: duh-DUH. Pentameter means that each line in the poem has five feet or ten total syllables. 

Iambic pentameter is just one of the many kinds of rhythm a poem can have . Other types of feet include the trochee , two syllables where the first syllable is stressed (DUH-duh), and dactyl , three syllables where only the first is stressed (DUH-duh-duh). When a poem only has one foot per line, it’s in monometer; when there are two feet per line, it’s in dimeter; and so on. 

Stressed and unstressed syllables aren’t the only way you can create rhythm in your poetry. Another technique poets frequently embrace is repetition. Repetition underscores the words being repeated, which could be a phrase or a single word. In her poem “Still I Rise”, Maya Angelou repeats the phrase “I rise” with increasing frequency as the poem progresses, changing it from “I’ll rise” in the first stanzas to a repeated “I rise” toward the ending, to emphasize her unbreakable spirit:

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear

Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,

I am the dream and the hope of the slave.

With poetry, rhythm and rhyme go hand in hand. Both create musicality in the poem, making it pleasurable to recite and listen to. 

Rhymes can appear anywhere in a poem, not just at the ends of alternating lines. Take a look at all the places Lewis Carrol uses rhymes in this excerpt from “Jabberwocky”:

One, two! One, two! And through and through

      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

      He went galumphing back.

When you’re reading poetry, one of the first things you’ll likely notice is its formatting. Simply put, poems just aren’t formatted the same way as prose. Sentences end in weird places, there are blank lines between the different sections, one word might have a line all to itself, or the words might be arranged in a shape that makes a picture on the page. 

One of poetry’s defining characteristics is that it doesn’t adhere to the same formatting that prose does. You (most likely) won’t find sentences and paragraphs in poetry. Instead, you’ll find stanzas, lines, and line breaks. 

A stanza is the poetic equivalent of a paragraph. It’s a group of lines that (usually) adheres to a specific rhyme or rhythm pattern. For example, a quatrain is a four-line stanza in which the second and fourth lines rhyme. An isometric stanza is a stanza of any length where each line has the same meter. 

Literary devices

Literary devices aren’t limited to prose—many, perhaps even most, poems incorporate one or more literary devices. Literary devices commonly found in poetry include:

  • Figurative language
  • Juxtaposition
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personification

Often, poets use literary devices in conjunction with other poetic elements. One famous example of a poem that layers multiple literary devices is Margaret Atwood’s “[you fit into me]”:

you fit into me

like a hook into an eye

a fish hook

an open eye

In the first stanza, Atwood uses a simile, a type of figurative language , to create an initially pleasant image: a hook and eye closure, a small metal hook that neatly fits into an appropriately sized metal loop to fasten clothing. Then the second stanza juxtaposes this with a jarring image: a fish hook plunged into an eyeball. These images together, formatted as two stark sections separated by a break, express the poem’s uncomfortable, visceral theme. 

Types of poetic forms

There are many different types of poems. Some have very strict style rules, while others are classified according to the topics they cover rather than their structure. When you’re writing poetry, keep the form you’re writing in mind as you brainstorm—with forms that involve rhyming or require a specific number of syllables, you’ll probably want to jot down a list of go-to words that fit into your chosen format before you start writing. 

A haiku is a three-line poem that always fits this format: The first and third lines contain five syllables and the second line contains seven syllables. 

A limerick is a five-line poem that follows a strict AABBA rhyme scheme. Though they often discuss humorous subjects, this isn’t a requirement—the only requirement is that it fits this precise rhyme pattern.  

A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem that was often used by Shakespeare and Petrarch. Although a sonnet’s exact rhyme scheme varies from poem to poem, each sonnet has some kind of consistent rhyme pattern.

Here’s a tip: Grammarly’s  Citation Generator  ensures your essays have flawless citations and no plagiarism. Try it for citing sonnets in Chicago , MLA , and APA styles.

Blank verse

Blank verse poetry is written in a specific meter that, as a rule, does not rhyme. Although this specific meter is often iambic pentameter, that isn’t a requirement for blank verse poetry—the only requirements are that it does not stray from its meter (whichever meter the poet chose) and that it doesn’t rhyme. 

With free verse, anything goes. When you read a poem that doesn’t appear to fit any specific format, you’re reading free verse poetry. 

An ode is a poem that celebrates a person, an event, or even an object. An ode uses vivid language to describe its subject. 

Elegies are poems that, like odes, pay tribute to specific subjects. However, rather than being purely celebratory, an elegy is generally a reflection on its subject’s death and includes themes of mourning and loss. 

How to write a poem

Writing a poem isn’t the same as writing a short story , an essay, an email, or any other type of writing. While each of these other kinds of writing requires a unique approach, they all have one thing in common: they’re prose. 

Poetry isn’t prose, as we explained above. And that’s what makes it feel like the wildcard of creative writing. 

With poetry, going through the standard writing process can feel like a creativity killer. That doesn’t mean you should just sit down, scrawl out a poem, and call it a day. On the contrary, when you’re writing poetry, you might find that skipping one or more stages in the traditional writing process will help you be more creative. 

Of course, you might also find that following the writing process helps you explore and organize your thoughts before you start to write. The usefulness of starting with brainstorming, then moving onto outlining, then starting to write only once you’ve got an outline varies from poet to poet and even poem to poem. Sometimes, inspiration strikes and the words just start flowing out of your mind and onto the page. 

Here are a few tips to help you get started and write your next poem:

1 Decide what you want to write about

Unless you’ve been assigned to write a poem about a specific topic, the first step in writing a poem is determining a topic to write about. Look for inspiration around you, perhaps in nature, your community, current events, or the people in your life. Take notes on how different things make you feel and what they drive you to think about. 

Freewriting can be a helpful exercise when you’re searching for the perfect topic to write a poem about. You can use a writing prompt as a jumping-off point for your freewriting or just jot down a word (or a few) and see where your mind guides your pen, stream-of-consciousness style. 

Once you have a topic and a theme in mind, the next step is to determine which kind of poem is the best way to express it. 

2 Determine the best format for your topic

Your poem doesn’t have to adhere to any specific format, but choosing a format and sticking to it might be the way to go. By opting to write in a particular format, like a sonnet or a limerick, for example, you constrain your writing and force yourself to find a way to creatively express your theme while fitting that format’s constraints. 

3 Explore words, rhymes, and rhythm

If you’ve decided to write your poem in a specific format, read other poems in that format to give yourself a template to follow. A specific rhythm or rhyme scheme can highlight themes and clever wordplay in your poem. For example, you might determine that a limerick is the most effective way to make your readers laugh at your satirical poem because the format feels like it has a built-in punchline. 

4 Write the poem

Now it’s time to write! Whether you opt for using a pen and paper, typing on a laptop, or tapping on your phone, give yourself some uninterrupted time to focus on writing the poem. 

Don’t expect to write something perfect on the first try. Instead, focus on getting your words out. Even if your lines don’t rhyme perfectly or you’ve got too many or too few syllables to fit the format you chose, write what’s on your mind. The theme your words are expressing is more important than the specific words themselves, and you can always revise your poem later. 

5 Edit what you’ve written

Once you have a draft, the next step is to edit your poem. You don’t have to jump right from writing to editing—in fact, it’s better if you don’t. Give yourself a break. Then in a day or two, come back to your poem with a critical eye. By that, we mean read it again, taking note of any spots where you can replace a word with a stronger one, tighten your rhythm, make your imagery more vivid, or even remove words or stanzas that aren’t adding anything to the poem. When you do this, you might realize that the poem would work better in another form or that your poem would be stronger if it rhymed . . . or if it didn’t. 

Reading your poem aloud can help you edit it more effectively because when you listen to it, you’ll hear the poem’s rhythm and quickly notice any spots where the rhythm doesn’t quite work. This can help you move words around or even completely restructure the poem. 

If you’re comfortable sharing your poetry with others, have somebody else read your poem and give you feedback on ways you can improve it. You might even want to join a writing group, online or off, where you can workshop your poetry with other writers. Often, other people can spot strengths and weaknesses in your work that you might not have noticed because your perspective is too close to the poem. A more distanced perspective, as well as perspectives from readers and writers of different backgrounds, can offer up ways to make your writing stronger that you hadn’t considered before. 

Give your writing extra spark

When you’re writing poetry, you’re allowed to break the rules. In fact, you’re encouraged to break the rules. Breaking the rules artistically is one of the key differences between writing poetry and writing prose. 

But making mistakes isn’t the same as breaking the rules. Mistakes in your poetry, like misspelled words and incorrect punctuation, can distract readers from what you’re communicating through your words. That’s where Grammarly comes in. Grammarly catches any mistakes or tone inconsistencies in your work and suggests ways you can make your writing stronger. The outcome: writing with confidence and getting better at breaking the rules on purpose.

write a good speech

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COMMENTS

  1. Here's How to Write a Perfect Speech

    Updated on May 22, 2019 Writing Tips Writing a speech isn't all that different than writing for other mediums. You need to know your audience, the required length, and the purpose or topic. This is true whether your speech is for a business conference, a wedding, a school project, or any other scenario.

  2. How to Write a Good Speech: 10 Steps and Tips

    Firstly, clarity and purpose are key. The speaker must be clear and focused on their message throughout. The audience should easily understand the purpose and takeaway of the speech without any ambiguity. Remembering the audience

  3. 3 Ways to Write a Speech

    1 Research your topic well. If you are writing an informative or persuasive speech, then it should be very well researched! This will help to give you credibility and make your points far more convincing.

  4. Speeches

    Get their attention, otherwise known as "The Hook" Think about how you can relate to these listeners and get them to relate to you or your topic. Appealing to your audience on a personal level captures their attention and concern, increasing the chances of a successful speech. Speakers often begin with anecdotes to hook their audience's attention.

  5. How to write a great speech

    1. Keep it simple All good speeches have a very simple message, one big idea that the speakers want to get across. So think about what that big idea is and stick to that. 2. Repeat, repeat, repeat! Once a good speaker has found their big, simple idea, they repeat it, repeat it, and repeat it.

  6. How to Write a Speech: 6 Tips for a Powerful Address

    How Do You Write a Good Speech? Before you can deliver a powerful message that stays with your listeners for a long time, you must write a well-structured speech that is clear, definite, brief, and complete. Here are the steps you can follow if you've booked a speaking engagement or need to deliver an important presentation: 1.

  7. How to Write a Great Speech in 7 Simple Steps

    Share From doing research to choosing a presentation tool, here are seven steps to take to writing an effective and engaging speech. — Getty Images/Klaus Vedfelt If you're preparing for a presentation, the work really begins when you sit down to write your speech.

  8. How to Write a Structured Speech in 5 Steps

    Written by MasterClass Last updated: Aug 19, 2021 • 5 min read Learning how to write a speech requires a keen awareness of how to tailor your rhetoric to a given issue and specific audience. Check out our essential speech-writing guidelines to learn how to craft an effective message that resonates with your audience.

  9. How to Write a Speech: Top Tips

    A great speech is impactful and engaging. It should eloquently and clearly express your ideas. Whatever the topic, a good speech should showcase your authority on a topic and demonstrate excellent communication and leadership skills. Many people don't know how to write a speech, so the process seems daunting.

  10. How To Write a Speech Everyone Will Remember

    1. Keep it short & sweet. One of the best markers of a good speech is that it ends before people get antsy. 2. Don't make it about you. You may have everyone's attention, but keep the spotlight where it belongs—on the audience. 3. Practice, practice, practice.

  11. How to write a good speech [7 easily followed steps]

    Step 1: Begin with a speech overview or outline Are you in a hurry? Without time to read a whole page? And come back to get the details later. Before you start writing you need to know: you are writing your speech for (your target audience) you are preparing this speech. What's the main purpose of your speech?

  12. 11 Tips for Giving a Great Speech

    Do you really need longer to make your points? Achieve brevity by writing out the speech you would give if you had all the time in the world, and then cut anything that seems extraneous or boring. 3. Consider what your audience wants to hear

  13. How to Write a Great Speech for Public Speaking in 7 Steps

    For example, people use one writing tool to put the speech's theme in a 15-20 word short poem or memorable paragraph, then build your speech around it. 3. Have a Clear Structure. When your speech has a clear structure to it your speech becomes more memorable. When writing your speech, have a clear path and a destination.

  14. How to Make a Good Speech for School

    To make a good speech for school, choose a theme or topic to focus your speech on so it's easier to write. When you're writing your speech, stick with simple language so your audience understands and doesn't get bored. Also, try to start your speech with a joke, story, or shocking fact that will immediately grab their attention.

  15. The 8 Key Steps to Successful Speech Writing (With Tips)

    5. Use concrete details and visual aids. Use concrete details to support your points. Brief stories, interesting examples, or factual data can help to engage your audience and convey the truth of your purpose. Consider using visual aids to further support your speech. Images can be powerful and engaging.

  16. How to write a perfect speech

    Cody Keenan, speechwriter to Barack Obama, shares his top tips for how to deliver a speech that will be remembered. He says a great speech is authentic, spea...

  17. How to Write a Speech Essay for Any Occasion

    You need to write a speech in a way that keeps the attention of an audience and helps paint a mental image at the same time. This means that your speech should contain some color, drama, or humor. It should have "flair.". Make your speech memorable by using attention-grabbing anecdotes and examples.

  18. 20+ Free Speech Examples to Craft the Best Speech

    1. Speech Examples 2. Tips to Write a Good Speech Speech Examples Talking in front of a bunch of audiences is not as easy as it seems. But, if you have some good content to deliver or share with the audience, the confidence comes naturally. Before you start writing your speech, it is a good idea that you go through some good speech samples.

  19. 7 Keys for Writing a Strong Speech

    Here are the main ingredients for writing a great speech. Make it concise A good speech is concise. You don't want to waste your audience's time with lengthy introductions and unnecessary details. Of course, you may want to deliver a lot of information, but it doesn't mean that your speech should be long. If you have control over the ...

  20. How to Write a Speech: A Guide to Enhance Your Writing Skills

    Identify your audience: When writing or delivering a speech, your audience play the major role. Unless you know who your target audience is, you will not be able to draft a good and appropriate speech. Decide the length of the speech: Whatever be the topic, make sure you keep it short and to the point. Making a speech longer than it needs to be ...

  21. How to write a speech for KS3 English students

    Key points Test your knowledge Did you know? The longest speech ever recorded in the UK Parliament was delivered in the House of Commons in 1828 and lasted for six hours! Introduction to how to...

  22. Speech Writing

    4. Create the right tone for the right audience. Before you would start writing your speech, determine first who is your audience, the reason why they are there, and what they want to hear from you based on the theme of the event or the event itself. For example, you are invited as a guest speaker in a women empowerment forum.

  23. Online speech generator

    Use this Online Speech Generator to Help You Quickly Create a Good Speech Get your troublesome papers finished by our competent writers now! Hire A Writer Now Special offer! Get 20% discount on your first order. Promo code: SAVE20 To generate speech essays, enter your prompt, and the tool will generate a speech essay.

  24. 454 Persuasive Speech Topics: Easy, Fun, & Controversial Ideas for

    Transition 1: Include a linking sentence that would tie your introduction to your speech's main body. Point 1—Need for action: Describe the problems concerning your topic and their effects, supporting your claims with evidence. Problem 1 + Effects + Evidence Problem 2 + Effects + Evidence Problem 3 + Effects + Evidence.

  25. How to Write a Poem: A Step-by-Step Guide

    1 Decide what you want to write about. Unless you've been assigned to write a poem about a specific topic, the first step in writing a poem is determining a topic to write about. Look for inspiration around you, perhaps in nature, your community, current events, or the people in your life.

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