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How to Write a Good Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter can be intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be!

Some people believe cover letters are a science. Others seem to think they are more akin to black magic. Regardless of how you feel about cover letters, they are one of the most important parts of the job application process. Your resume or CV may get you an interview, but a good cover letter is what ensures that the hiring manager reads your resume in the first place.

Writing a cover letter for any job is important, but the art of writing a good cover letter for a research position can make or break your application. While writing a cover letter for a research position, you have to walk a fine line of proving your expertise and passion while limiting jargon and dense language.

In this post, we will explain cover letter writing basics, and then dive into how to write a research specific cover letter with examples of both good and bad practices.

hands typing on blank google doc

What Is A Cover Letter and Why Do Cover Letters Matter?

A cover letter is your opportunity to tell a story and connect the dots of your resume. Resumes and curriculum vitae (CVs) are often cold and static—they don’t show any sort of character that will give companies a hint about if you will fit in with their culture. 

Your cover letter gives you the chance to demonstrate that you are an interesting, qualified, and intelligent person. Without proving that you are worth the time to interview, a company or research organization will set your application in the rejection pile without giving it a second look. 

So, what is a cover letter, exactly? It is an explanation (written out in paragraph form) of what you can bring to the company that goes beyond the information in your resume. Cover letters give a company a glimpse into the qualities that will make you the ideal candidate for their opening. 

Note that a cover letter is not the same as a letter of intent. A cover letter is written for a specific job opening. For example, if I got an email saying that the University of Colorado was looking for a tenure track faculty member to teach GEO 1001, and I chose to apply, I would write a cover letter. 

A letter of intent, however, is written regardless of the job opening. It is intended to express an interest in working at a particular company or with a particular group. The goal of a letter of intent is to demonstrate your interest in the company (or whatever type of group you are appealing to) and illustrate that you are willing to work with them in whatever capacity they feel is best. 

For example, if I loved the clothing company, Patagonia and wanted to work there, I could write a letter of intent. They may have an opening for a sales floor associate, but after reading my application and letter of intent, decide I would be better suited to a design position. Or, they may not have any positions open at all, but choose to keep my resume on hand for the next time they do. 

Most organizations want a cover letter, not a letter of intent, so it is important to make sure your cover letter caters to the specifics of the job posting. A cover letter should also demonstrate why you want to work at the company, but it should be primarily focused on why you can do the job better than any of the other applicants.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter: The Basics 

Writing a cover letter isn’t hard. Writing a good cover letter, a cover letter that will encourage a hiring manager to look at your application and schedule an interview, is more difficult (but certainly not impossible). Below, we will go over each of the important parts of a cover letter: the salutation, introduction, body, and conclusion, as well as some other best practices.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Salutation

Don’t start with “Dear Sir/Ma’am” (or any iteration of a vague greeting, including “to whom it may concern”). Avoiding vague greetings is the oldest trick in the book, but it still holds a lot of weight. Starting a cover letter with the above phrase is pretty much stamping “I didn’t bother to research this company at all because I am sending out a million generic cover letters” across your application. It doesn’t look good. 

The best practice is to do your research and use your connections to find a name. “Dear Joe McGlinchy” means a lot more than “Dear Hiring Manager.” LinkedIn is a great tool for this—you can look up the company, then look through the employees until you find someone that seems like they hire for the relevant department. 

The most important thing about the salutation is to address a real human. By selecting someone in the company, you’ve demonstrated that you’ve done some research and are actually interested in this company specifically. Generic greetings aren’t eye-catching and don’t do well.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Introduction

Once you’ve addressed your cover letter to a real human being, you need a powerful introduction to prove that this cover letter is worth the time it will take to read. This means that you need a hook. 

Your first sentence needs to be a strong starter, something to encourage the hiring manager not only to continue reading the cover letter, but to look at your application as well. If you have a contact in the company, you should mention them in the first sentence. Something along the lines of “my friend, Amanda Rice (UX/UI manager), suggested I apply for the natural language processing expert position after we worked together on a highly successful independent project.” 

The example above uses a few techniques. The name drop is good, but that only works if you actually have a connection in the company. Beyond that, this example has two strengths. First, it states the name of the position. This is important because hiring managers can be hiring for several different positions at a time, and by immediately clarifying which position you are applying for, you make their job a little bit easier.  Next, this sentence introduces concrete skills that apply to the job. That is a good way to start because it begins leading into the body, where you will go into depth about how exactly your experience and skills make you perfect for the job. 

Another technique for a strong lead-in to a cover letter is to begin with an applicable personal experience or anecdote. This attracts more attention than stereotypical intros (like the example above), but you have to be careful to get to the point quickly. Give yourself one or two sentences to tell the story and prove your point before you dive into your skills and the main body of the cover letter.

A more standard technique for introductions is simply expressing excitement. No matter how you choose to start, you want to demonstrate that you are eager about the position, and there is no easier way to do that than just saying it. This could take the form of “When I saw the description for X job on LinkedIn, I was thrilled: it is the perfect job for my Y skills and Z experience.” This option is simple and to-the-point, which can be refreshing for time-crunched hiring managers. 

Since we’ve provided a few good examples, we will offer a bad example, so you can compare and contrast. Don’t write anything along the line of: “My name is John Doe, and I am writing to express my interest in the open position at your company.” 

There are a few issues here. First, they can probably figure out your name. You don’t need that to be in the first sentence (or any of the sentences—the closing is an obvious enough spot). Next, “the open position” and “your company” are too generic. That sounds like the same cover letter you sent to every single employer in a hundred mile radius. Give the specifics! Finally, try to start with a little more spice. Add in some personality, something to keep the hiring manager reading. If you bore them to death in the first line, they aren’t going to look over your resume and application with the attention they deserve. 

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body

So, you’ve addressed a real human being, and you’ve snagged their attention with a killer opening line. What next? Well, you have to hold on to that attention by writing an engaging and informative cover letter body. 

The body of a cover letter is the core of the important information you want to transmit. The introduction’s job was to snag the attention of the hiring manager. The body’s job is to sell them on your skills.  There are a few formatting things to be aware of before we start talking about what content belongs in the body of the cover letter. First, keep the company culture and standards in mind when picking a format. For example, if I want to work for a tech startup that is known for its wit and company culture, I can probably get away with using a bulleted list or another informal format. However, if I am applying to a respected research institution, using a standard five paragraph format is best. 

In addition, the cover letter should not be longer than a page. Hiring managers are busy people. They may have hundreds of resumes to read, so they don’t need a three page essay per person. A full page is plenty, and many hiring managers report finding three hundred words or less to be the idea length. Just to put that into context, the text from here to the “How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body” header below is about perfect, length-wise. 

Now, on to the more important part: the content. A cover letter should work in tandem with a resume. If you have a list of job experiences on your resume, don’t list them again in the cover letter. Use the valuable space in the cover letter to give examples about how you have applied your skills and experience. 

For example, if I have worked as a barista, I wouldn’t just say “I have worked as a barista at Generic Cafe.” The hiring manager could learn that from my resume. Instead, I could say “Working as a barista at Generic Cafe taught me to operate under pressure without feeling flustered. Once…” I would go on to recount a short story that illustrated my ability to work well under pressure. It is important that the stories and details you choose to include are directly related to the specific job. Don’t ramble or add anything that isn’t obviously connected. Use the job description as a tool—if it mentions a certain skill a few times, make sure to include it!

If you can match the voice and tone of your cover letter to the voice of the company, that usually earns you extra points. If, in their communications, they use wit, feel free to include it in your letter as well. If they are dry, to the point, and serious, cracking jokes is not the best technique.

A Few Don’ts of Writing a Cover Letter Body   

There are a few simple “don’ts” in cover letter writing. Do not: 

  • Bad: I am smart, dedicated, determined, and funny.
  • Better: When I was working at Tech Company, I designed and created an entirely new workflow that cut the product delivery time in half. 
  • Bad: When I was seven, I really loved the monkeys at the zoo. This demonstrates my fun-loving nature. 
  • Better: While working for This Company, I realized I was far more productive if I was light-hearted. I became known as the person to turn to in my unit when my coworkers needed a boost, and as my team adopted my ideology, we exceeded our sales goals by 200%. 
  • Bad: I would love this job because it would propel me to the next stage of my career.
  • Better: With my decade of industry experience communicating with engineers and clients, I am the right person to manage X team. 
  • Bad: I know I’m not the most qualified candidate for this job, but…
  • Better: I can apply my years of experience as an X to this position, using my skills in Y and Z to… 
  • Bad: I am a thirty year old white woman from Denver…
  • Better: I have extensive experience managing diverse international teams, as illustrated by the time I…  

The most important part of the cover letter is the body. Sell your skills by telling stories, but walk the razor’s edge between saying too much and not enough. When in doubt, lean towards not enough—it is better for the hiring manager to call you in for an interview to learn more than to bore them.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Conclusion

 The last lines of a cover letter are extremely important. Until you can meet in-person for an interview, the conclusion of your cover letter will greatly affect the impression the hiring manager has of you. A good technique for concluding your cover letter is to summarize, in a sentence, what value you can bring to the company and why you are perfect for the position. Sum up the most important points from your cover letter in a short, concise manner. 

Write with confidence, but not arrogance. This can be a delicate balance. While some people have gotten away (and sometimes gotten a job) with remarks like, “I’ll be expecting the job offer soon,” most do not. Closing with a courteous statement that showcases your capability and skills is far more effective than arrogance. Try to avoid trite or generic statements in the closing sentence as well. This includes the template, “I am very excited to work for XYZ Company.” Give the hiring manager something to remember and close with what you can offer the company. 

The final step in any cover letter is to edit. Re-read your cover letter. Then, set it aside for a few hours (or days, time permitting) and read it again. Give it to a friend to read. Read it aloud. This may seem excessive, but there is nothing more off-putting than a spelling or grammar error in the first few lines of a cover letter. The hiring manager may power through and ignore it, but it will certainly taint their impression. 

Once the cover letter is as flawless and compelling as it can be, send it out! If you are super stuck on how to get started, working within a template may help. Microsoft Word has many free templates that are aesthetically appealing and can give you a hint to the length and content. A few good online options live here (free options are at the bottom—there is no reason to pay for a resume template).

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter for a research position is the same as writing any other cover letter. There are, however, a few considerations and additions that are worth pointing out. A job description may not directly ask for a cover letter, but it is good practice to send one unless they specifically say not to. This means that even if a cover letter isn’t mentioned, you should send one—it is best practice and gives you an opportunity to expand on your skills and research in a valuable way.

Format and Writing Style for a Research Position Cover Letter

Research and academics tend to appreciate formality more than start-ups or tech companies, so using the traditional five paragraph format is typically a good idea. The five paragraph format usually includes an introduction, three short examples of skills, and a concluding paragraph. This isn’t set in stone—if you’d rather write two paragraphs about the skills and experience you bring to the company, that is fine. 

Keep in mind that concise and to-the-point writing is extremely valuable in research. Anyone who has ever written a project proposal under 300 words knows that every term needs to add value. Proving that you are a skilled writer, starting in your cover letter, will earn you a lot of points. This means that cover letters in research and academia, though you may have more to say, should actually be shorter than others. Think of the hiring manager—they are plowing through a massive stack of verbose, technical, and complex cover letters and CVs. It is refreshing to find an easy to read, short cover letter. 

On the “easy to read” point, remember that the hiring manager may not be an expert in your field. Even if they are, you cannot assume that they have the exact same linguistic and educational background as you. For example, if you have dedicated the last five years of your life to studying a certain species of bacteria that lives on Red-Eyed Tree Frogs, all of those technical terms you have learned (and maybe even coined) have no place in your cover letter. Keep jargon to an absolute minimum. Consider using a tool like the Hemingway Editor to identify and eliminate jargon. While you want to reduce jargon, it is still important to prove that you’ve researched their research. Passion about the research topic is one of the most valuable attributes that a new hire can offer. 

Use your cover letter to prove that you have done your homework, know exactly what the institution or group is doing, and want to join them. If you have questions about the research or want to learn more, it isn’t a bad idea to get in touch with one of the researchers. You can often use LinkedIn or the group’s staff site to learn who is working on the project and reach out.

What Research Information Should be Included in a Cover Letter

A research position cover letter is not the place for your academic history, dissertation, or publications. While it may be tempting to go into detail about the amazing research you did for your thesis, that belongs in your CV. Details like this will make your cover letter too long. While these are valuable accomplishments, don’t include them unless there is something  that pertains to the group’s research, and your CV doesn’t cover it in depth. 

If you do choose to write about your research, write about concrete details and skills that aren’t in your CV. For example, if you have spent the last few years working on identifying the effects of a certain gene sequence in bird migration, include information about the lab techniques you used. Also, try to put emphasis on the aspects of your resume and CV that make you stand out from other candidates. It is likely that you will be competing with many similarly qualified candidates, so if you have a unique skill or experience, make sure it doesn’t get lost in the chaos—a cover letter is the perfect place to highlight these sorts of skills. 

Industry experience is a great differentiator. If you have relevant industry experience, make sure to include it in your cover letter because it will almost certainly set you apart. Another valuable differentiator is a deep and established research network. If you have been working on research teams for years and have deep connections with other scientists, don’t be afraid to include this information. This makes you a very valuable acquisition for the company because you come with an extensive network

Include Soft Skills in Your Cover Letter

Scientific skills aren’t the only consideration for hiring managers. Experience working with and leading teams is incredibly valuable in the research industry. Even if the job description doesn’t mention teamwork, add a story or description of a time you worked with (or, even better, lead) a successful team. Soft skills like management, customer service, writing, and clear communication are important in research positions. Highlight these abilities and experiences in your cover letter in addition to the hard skills and research-based information. 

If you are struggling to edit and polish your letter, give it to both someone within your field and someone who is completely unfamiliar with your research (or, at least, the technical side of it). Once both of those people say that the letter makes sense and is compelling, you should feel confident submitting it.

Cover letters are intended to give hiring managers information beyond what your resume and CV are able to display. Write with a natural but appropriately formal voice, do your research on the position, and cater to the job description. A good cover letter can go a long way to getting you an interview, and with these tips, your cover letters will certainly stand out of the pile.

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Professional Researcher Cover Letter Example for 2023

Read for inspiration or use it as a base to improve your own Researcher cover letter. Just replace personal information, company application data and achievements with your own.

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Have a researcher cover letter that tells your story

Would a good cover letter increase your chances of landing an interview? Yes.

Do we have any specific tips for Researcher applications? Yes.

Are cover letters the same as resumes, but longer? Definitely not!

So what are cover letters?

Well, great cover letters give you the opportunity to tell a personal story, while making the right impression and proving you’re the best candidate at the same time.

Need more details? Let’s dive deep.

researcher coverletter.png

So what’s the difference between a cover letter and a resume?

In short – the resume showcases your achievements and skills, while the cover letter focuses more on your personality and motivations.

Of course, you should mention some of your relevant skills in the cover letter as well. But make sure you’re not repeating your resume word by word.

Now let's move on to the things that make every cover letter great!

Address your cover letter to the right person and make your introduction strong

Choosing the right salutation for your cover letter is crucial – after all, it’s the first thing the hiring manager will read.

For this reason, we’ve gathered several classic salutations. Note that some of them could be used even if you don't know the hiring manager's name.

  • Dear [company name] Recruiter
  • Dear Mr./Ms. Smith
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • To the [team you're applying for] Team

The introduction of your Researcher cover letter is without a doubt crucial for the first impression you’ll make as an applicant. But is there a way to make sure your opening line is good enough?

Yes, there is. You can start by sharing your enthusiasm for the job or the field (or why not both!). You could also share your reasons to find the company exciting.

Try to be original. Don’t go for phrases like “I want to apply for the position that I saw advertised on platform X”. They're outdated and sound like you’ve got nothing better to say

Emphasize your Researcher soft skills and mention your hard skills

So what skills do you need to include? Well, unfortunately, there’s no one answer to this. It all depends on the job description and the skills you’ve currently got.

According to experts, what recruiters look for in cover letters is how you can link your soft skills to particular achievements and goals. So, try to figure out what has helped you on the way to success.

However, don’t forget about hard skills. Even if they’re not the focus of your happy story, you need to include at least the ones that were mentioned as part of the requirements section of the job posting. This will help you pass applicant tracking systems (ATS) that screen applicant documents for certain keywords and phrases.

Show that you know the company and its problems well

Proving that you’re familiar with the company is a great way to win the recruiter’s heart. It shows that you’ve taken some time for research and that you’re attentive to detail.

What’s more, it will also help you find out the issues at hand. This way, you can link your own skills and qualifications to some potential challenges the company might have to deal with in the future.

End on a positive note

While the introduction is the best way to make a good impression, using the right words to end your cover letter can help you get a callback.

Our advice is to make sure that your closing line matches the company culture. However, “Looking forward to hearing from you” and other traditional phrases are always a safe choice.

Researcher cover letter

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Become the center of attention with a matching Researcher resume

Pairing your strong cover letter with a great resume can never be a bad idea. In fact, that’s one of the best ways to show you’re the ideal candidate for the position.

Tell your story with confidence with a job-winning Researcher resume template.

Still not sure what your cover letter should look like? Hire an expert to help you!

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Research Scientist Cover Letter

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  • Cover Letter

Research Scientist Cover Letter (With Examples)

While resumes are necessary for any complete job application, they only tell part of the story for many of us.

On the other hand, cover letters share more about who you are as a person and why you would be a good fit for the job . They also allow you to speak directly to the hiring manager long before an interview.

The perfect cover letter may seem like something out of your reach, especially if you are prone to imposter syndrome or simply dislike talking about yourself. But, you’re in luck, since there are numerous templates available for you to use; nearly every word processor has templates, including Microsoft Word and Google Docs .

Looking for a job? These position are hiring now near you:

  • Research Scientist
  • Associate Research Scientist
  • Research Associate
  • Associate Scientist

Parts of a Research Scientist Cover Lette

It doesn’t matter what job you’re applying to; the main structure of the letter will remain the same.

Cover letters begin with an opening. These openings follow tradition, meaning they start with an address and a formal greeting, as if you were sending the letter by mail.

Then, in the body of the letter , you will explain some of your experience, emphasize some of your greatest achievements, and talk a bit about yourself and why you would be a good fit for the position. You can also show off your writing and communication skills in this section while you’re at it.

Finally, you’ll end the letter with a few concluding words and a farewell.

Splitting the letter up into these three sections makes it a bit easier to handle, preventing you from becoming overwhelmed by the task itself.

Cover Letter Opening

As we said, the opening of the letter will include information you would find on a mailed letter.

To begin, in the header of your document, include your full name, phone number, email address, and any other information you’d like the hiring manager to have easy access to.

Start your document by checking your font. It should be 12pt Times New Roman, single-spaced.

The first line of the document should be the date that you’re submitting your application, written as Month Day, Year.

March 23, 2021

Next, you are going to include the information of the hiring manager. Sometimes their name will be included with the job listing, but if you cannot find it there, try doing some preliminary research on the company . Check out their LinkedIn and other social media pages to see if you can find someone with a title like “hiring manager.”

Once you’ve found it, consider how to address the person. If the company seems to have a more formal or traditional attitude, consider using a prefix such as Mr. or Ms. before the person’s name. If they seem more casual, use their full name.

Also, use their full name with no prefix if you are unsure of which prefix they would use -- say, they have a gender-neutral name such as Jessie or Pat.

If you cannot find the name of the person , simply addressing them as “Hiring Manager” is fine.

After this, you’re going to include information about the company, including their main address, which can most likely be found through a quick internet search or a scan of their website.

Then, start a new paragraph, and address the hiring manager. Using “Dear So-and-So” is an acceptable format.

Once you’ve gathered this information, your letter should look something like this:

Mr. John Smith Hiring Manager ABC Company 123 Main St. Anywhere, USA 12345 Dear Mr. John Smith,

Search For Research Scientist Jobs

Research scientist cover letter body.

This is probably the most challenging section of a cover letter to write, simply because it is the most personalized. That being said, feel free to play around with several drafts before deciding on which one best represents you.

Though this section is tailor-made to each individual, there is still a main outline you can follow.

First, you will state what the purpose of this letter is: to apply to a specific position. Hiring managers have to read through dozens of cover letters, and they may be hiring for several positions at once.

Because of this, it’s best not to beat around the bush. “I am writing to you to…” is a great way to begin, but don’t feel married to this sentence starter . You can also use this first sentence to explain what drew you to the position. For example, “As a long-time admirer of your firm and your work, I am excited to submit my application …”

You should mention the title of the position you are applying to and make sure the hiring manager is considering you for the correct position. You should also let them know where you found the job listing. This gives hiring managers valuable information as to which of their job listings are producing the most results.

With these things in mind, your opening sentence should look a bit like this:

As a long-time admirer of your firm, I am excited to submit my application for the Research Scientist position, as posted at Zippia .com.

Now that you have stated your intent, you will explain why you are an ideal candidate for this position. To begin, the easiest thing to do is to return to the job listing itself. Take a look at what they say they are looking for and note what qualifications you have that they want. This becomes your list of things to mention.

When describing your skill set, use language similar to the language used in the job listing . For example, if the job listing asks for someone familiar with research team management, you can say, “I have experience managing a research team.”

You can also list off your more technical skills in bullet points, since they tend not to require much explanation. Try to keep this short -- around four or five bullet points. For example,

I believe I would make a great addition to your team, as I have: Five years experience working in the field Manage research teams of 15+ Conducted dozens of varied experiments Planned and written funding requests valued at over $100,000 total

In this section of the letter, you can also take a few lines to describe your career journey so far. Talk about your education, your certificates, and past experiences. Make sure to remain positive when speaking about these. Talk about your past responsibilities and what you have learned at your last job that will help you in this one. For example:

I graduated from State University, earning my master’s degree in 2012, and I have since worked with many firms across the country. My experience working in a lab environment made me particularly aware of the importance of a properly run experiment and gave me the skills needed to summarize data for corporate consumption.

This section is also a chance for you to underline some of your accomplishments, whether that be a project you’re proud of or an obstacle you overcame. Try using data to back up your claims, as using data makes your claims more credible and helps the hiring manager understand the scale of your achievements.

It is more impactful to say, “I managed a research team of twenty members,” rather than “I managed a large research team.”

This section can be the hardest to write, but this is your time to shine. You deserve to have your hard work recognized. Don’t be afraid to brag a little, as this is the time and place to do it.

Research Scientist Cover Letter Closing Lines

Now that the hard part is over, and you’ve portrayed yourself in the best light possible, it’s time to wrap up your letter with a proper conclusion and farewell.

Start by reiterating your interest in the position .

I would like to discuss opportunities with ABC Company, and I hope to hear from you soon.

Include your contact information one more time. Thank them formally , and end with a professional signature.

You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or at [email protected] . Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, FirstName LastName

“Regards” and “Yours” can also be appropriate closings.

Example of a Research Scientist Cover Letter

Once you’ve completed your letter, it should look something like this:

March 23, 2021 Mr. John Smith Hiring Manager ABC Company 123 Main St. Anywhere, USA 12345 Dear Mr. John Smith, As a long-time admirer of your firm, I am excited to submit my application for the Research Scientist position, as posted at Zippia.com. I believe I would make a great addition to your team, as I have: Five years experience working in the field Manage research teams of 15% Conducted dozens of varied experiments Planned and written funding requests valued at over $100,000 total You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or at [email protected] . Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, FirstName LastName

Final Thoughts

Though it can be scary for all of us, writing a cover letter does not need to be complicated. It actually can make good practice, as writing a cover letter allows you to pitch yourself to someone who doesn’t know you, which is an essential skill in any interview.

Cover letters are what set you apart from the competition, especially since you will be far more likely to catch the eye of the hiring manager and possibly land a highly coveted interview. Luckily, there is no shortage of resources out there that make writing a cover letter as easy as possible.

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My Resume DB

15 Research Scientist Cover Letters That Will Get Hired (NOW)

Are you are looking to write a cover letter for Research Scientist jobs that will impress recruiters and get you noticed by hiring managers? You need one to apply for a job, but you don’t know what to say.

The recruitment process for a job can be a long and tedious process. A resume may not always capture the candidate’s qualifications, but a well-crafted cover letter will. Every year, companies spend billions of dollars just to review resumes that have no cover letters attached. In this article, we’ll explore the importance of writing a cover letter and how it can help you land your next job.

Here are 15 amazing Research Scientist cover letters that are professionally written and will help you stand out and get that job!

research cover letter sample

Research Scientist Cover Letters

Each cover letter is written with a different focus. Review all of them and pick the ones that apply to your situation. Take inspiration from multiple samples and combine them to craft your unique cover letter.

Research Scientist Sample 1

I am a Research Scientist with an educational background in the natural sciences and I am interested in your open position as a Research Scientist. I would like to discuss how my skills and experience will contribute to your company.

My skills and qualifications include: -Ability to train, motivate, and organize research groups -Quality control of laboratory experiments for accuracy -Expertise in molecular biology and biochemistry, including cloning and sequencing techniques -Experience with both basic research as well as applied research projects -Hands on experience with the latest technologies such as PCR, DNA sequencing, RNA analysis etc. etc.

Research Scientist Sample 2

I am writing to apply for the Research Scientist position at your company. As a PhD in molecular biology with experience in research and teaching, I have an impressive resume of work to show off. I have been doing research on the link between DNA methylation and how it relates to cancer since my undergraduate years, which is what initially sparked my interest in the field. It has been my life-long ambition to be able to dedicate all of my time towards this area of study, which is why applying for your position excites me so much. If you are interested, please contact me by email at sc [email protected] or by phone at (520) 555-1212 ext 12345

Research Scientist Sample 3

Dear Dr. Ford,

I am writing to express my interest in the Research Scientist position you posted on LinkedIn. In addition to my work experience and education, I have a proven ability to learn quickly and apply new skills in a fast-paced environment. I believe that these qualifications and my experience working with both large and small research teams would be invaluable for this role.

Research Scientist Sample 4

Research scientist sample 5.

I am a PhD candidate at University of Phoenix with a specialization in Clinical Psychology. I have been working as a research assistant for the last two years and am seeking a Research Scientist position. My background includes mixed methodology, organizational interventions, and statistical analysis.

Research Scientist Sample 6

Dear Mr. or Ms. ________, I’m a recent graduate from ________ University with a Bachelors degree in Biology and an emphasis on ecology and conservation biology. I have been successful in my studies so far by being very focused and determined to be the best student I can be as well as being passionate about what I do. As a result of this, I am confident that I am the perfect candidate for your Research Scientist position at your company! I hope to further develop my skills with you company by working alongside like-minded individuals who are committed to finding solutions for our planet’s ecological challenges. Sincerely, ________________

Research Scientist Sample 7

Dear Manager,

I am writing in regards to the Research Scientist position you recently posted. I would like to express my interest in this position and share with you some of my qualifications. My resume is attached for your review. I have a PhD in Business Administration, but since then I have spent years working as an independent consultant for technology companies, research institutes and government organizations all over the world. My experience includes management of large projects requiring strategic thinking and creative problem solving skills; liaising with high-level personnel; advising on budgeting; effective team leadership; project management from start-up through completion including contract negotiation and execution; strong interpersonal skills which enable me to work successfully with all levels of staff from executives to interns. In

Research Scientist Sample 8

I am interested in the Research Scientist position advertised on your website and would like to inquire about the status of the position. I believe I am a strong candidate for this role with my extensive research experience and expertise in ____. My resume is attached, please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or would like to set up an interview.

Research Scientist Sample 9

I am writing to inquire about the Research Scientist position. I have a PhD in Biochemistry and a Master’s degree in Biotechnology from XYZ University, as well as experience conducting research on a variety of topic areas. I am confident that my education and experience qualify me for this position.

Research Scientist Sample 10

I am writing in response to your advertisement for a Research Scientist position with ABC Corporation. I am very interested in the position and think my extensive experience with XYZ company qualifies me for this position.

I have over 10 years of experience working as a research scientist with both small and large companies. I’m confident that my skills would be an asset to your company, so I wanted to apply for this job. Thank you for considering me!

Research Scientist Sample 11

I am writing to express my interest in the research scientist position you have vacant. I have a PhD degree in molecular biology and four years of experience working as a research scientist for an environmental consulting firm. I would be happy to provide any additional information you require, and thank you for your consideration of my application.

Research Scientist Sample 12

I am a Research Scientist with a Masters degree in Biochemistry and extensive experience in performing experiments. I have a proven track record of working collaboratively with teams to complete project timelines. My goal is to find a position that can leverage my skills and experiences, so I am interested in the Research Scientist position you posted on your website.

Research Scientist Sample 13

I am writing in response to your advertisement for a Research Scientist position. I am an experienced biomedical scientist who has substantial research experience in the fields of pulmonary biology and immunology. My recent work has focused on stem cell differentiation, with particular interest in neurogenesis and the study of how organ systems communicate with one another. I believe that my extensive knowledge would be an asset to your laboratory team.

I am writing in response to your advertisement for a Research Scientist position. My background is primarily in virology, specifically influenza A virus, but I have also studied rabies virus, HIV-1 virus, coronavirus 229E and 230P2, and rabbit parainfluenza 3 virus

Research Scientist Sample 14

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am writing to express my interest in being considered for a Research Scientist position at ABC Corporation. I have an extensive background in research and data analysis and am confident that I would be a perfect fit for this position. In addition to my experience, I have a strong work ethic and drive that will help me contribute to the team’s success. Thank you for your consideration of my application.

Research Scientist Sample 15

City, ST Zip Code  Dear Sir or Madam,  I am a recent graduate from the University of California Santa Cruz with a degree in Biology. I have extensive experience in biological research and have had my work published in multiple scientific journals. I would like to apply for the Research Scientist position at your company. If you need any further information please contact me at (phone number). Thank you for your consideration, Yours truly

Recruiters and hiring managers receive hundreds of applications for each job opening.

Use the above professionally written Research Scientist cover letter samples to learn how to write a cover letter that will catch their attention and customize it for your specific situation.

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Home » 7 Best Research cover letter Sample [Ready]

7 Best Research cover letter Sample [Ready]

Research cover letter

When it comes to writing a cover letter for a research position, there are a few things you need to keep in mind. First, you want to make sure that your letter is addressed to the correct person. Then, you want to briefly introduce yourself and explain why you are interested in the position. Be sure to mention your relevant skills and experience, as well as any relevant coursework or research you have done. Finally, be sure to express your enthusiasm for the position and thank the recipient for their time. By following these tips, you can be sure that your research cover letter will make a great first impression. Thank you for your consideration!

Table of Contents

How To Write a Research Cover Letter?

The cover letter is one of the most important parts of any research proposal. It is the first thing that a journal editor or reviewer sees, and it sets the tone for the rest of the document. A well-written cover letter will capture the editor’s attention and make them want to read more. By contrast, a poorly written cover letter will do just the opposite.

Fortunately, there are some things you can do to improve your chances of success. Here are seven tips for writing an effective research cover letter:

  • Start with a bang: The first sentence of your cover letter should be attention-grabbing and compel the reader to read on.
  • Keep it short and sweet: Cover letters should be no more than one page in length. Get to the point quickly and avoid adding unnecessary details.
  • Highlight your strengths: Use your cover letter to highlight your most important qualifications and achievements. Don’t be shy about bragging a little bit – this is your chance to sell yourself!
  • Explain why your research is important: Be sure to explain why your research is important and how it will contribute to the field. This is what will really capture the editor’s attention.
  • Make it error-free: Proofread your cover letter carefully before sending it off – even small mistakes can make you look unprofessional.
  • Follow submission guidelines: Make sure you follow all of the journal’s submission guidelines, including formatting requirements for the cover letter itself. failure to do so could result in your paper being automatically rejected without being sent out for review at all!

These seven tips should help you write an effective research cover letter that will improve your chances of getting your paper accepted for publication. Remember, this is just one part of the equation – be sure to put just as much effort into writing a strong paper itself!

Related: How To Write a Cover Letter (And Get Hired in 2022!)

research assistant cover letter

Research Cover Letter

Dear hiring Manager,

As a , I am excited to apply for the position at . My research experience and skills make me the ideal candidate for this position, and I am eager to contribute to the team.

During my time as a research assistant at , I honed my skills in data collection and analysis, as well as literature review and synthesis. C onfident in my ability to design and conduct research projects, as well as effectively communicate findings. I It also familiar with a variety of research methods and software programs that would be beneficial to the team.

Believe that my skills and experience make me the perfect candidate for the research cover letter sample position, and I am excited to learn more about _ . Thank you for your consideration, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Related: Research Assistant Cover Letter: 05 Sample Ideas

Research Assistant Cover Letter

I am writing in regards to the research assistant opening at your company. I am confident that I have the skills and experience required for this role and would be a valuable asset to your team.

As a research assistant at my previous job, I was responsible for conducting literature reviews, data collection and analysis, and preparing reports. Have experience coordinating research projects and collaborating with other team members. I am best in research methods and have a strong interest in the topic area.

Confident that I can make a significant contribution to your company as a research assistant. I am eager to utilize my skills and experience in this role and would appreciate the opportunity to do so.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Related: 7+ Professional Assistant Principal Cover Letter

Cover Letter For Research Internship

Writing to apply for the research internship position advertised on your website.

Currently a third year psychology student at XYZ University and I am very interested in pursuing a career in research. Believe that this internship would be the perfect opportunity for me to gain some valuable experience in the field.

Have excellent academic credentials and also have involve in a number of research projects during my time at the university. The confident that I have the skills and abilities to be successful in this role. To available to start work from June onwards and would be grateful if you could keep me in mind for any upcoming vacancies. I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours sincerely,

Related: Cover Letter for Fresh Graduate:07 Samples & Examples

Research Analyst Cover Letter

I am writing in regards to the research analyst position that you have recently posted. In the job description, I believe that I am a strong candidate for the role and would like to consider above all.

As a research analyst, I have gained extensive experience in data analysis, report writing, and presentations. I have also developed excellent research and problem-solving skills. In addition, I have the ability to work independently and as part of a team.

I am confident that I can be an asset to your organization and would welcome the opportunity to discuss my qualifications in further detail. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Related: 07 Best Research Analyst Cover Letter Samples

Research Associate Cover Letter

Writing to apply for the research associate position at your company. It is a recent graduate of XYZ University with a degree in Biology and have experience working in a research laboratory. I am excited to put my skills and knowledge to work in a new setting, and believe that I would be an asset to your team.

In my previous position, I was responsible for conducting experiments, documenting results, and writing reports. The well-versed in the scientific method and have a keen eye for detail. I am also proficient in Microsoft Office and various statistical software programs.

It eager to contribute to the research being conducted at your company and would welcome the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Related: 145+ Creative Safety Officer Resume Objective ideas

Sample Cover Letter For a Research Assistant With No Experience

I am writing to apply for the research assistant position advertised on your website. Although I have no previous experience working as a research assistant, I am confident that I have the skills and abilities necessary to be successful in this role.

In particular, I have strong research and analytical skills, which I believe would be beneficial in conducting research projects. Additionally, I am highly organized and detail-oriented, which would be beneficial in managing data and keeping track of project progress. Finally, I have excellent written and verbal communication skills, which would be beneficial in communicating with team members and stakeholders.

Overall, I believe that my skills and abilities would make me an ideal candidate for the research assistant position. I am eager to utilize my skills in a professional setting and contribute to the success of your research projects. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further with you in an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Related: 07 Unique Procurement cover letter Samples

7 Things To Include In Research Cover Letter

A research cover letter is a document that introduces your skills and strengths in relation to the position you are applying for. A research cover letter should be included with every application you submit to a potential employer, whether it is for a postdoctoral fellowship, a faculty position, or another type of research position. The cover letter gives you an opportunity to explain why you are the best candidate for the position and how your skills and experience will contribute to the success of the research project. While there is no one-size-fits-all template for a research cover letter, there are some essential elements that should be included in all letters. Here are seven tips for writing an effective research cover letter.

  • Start by introducing yourself and explain why you are interested in the position.
  • Summarize your relevant skills and experience.
  • Discuss your previous research achievements and how they will benefit the project you are applying for.
  • Indicate your willingness to work hard and be an asset to the team.
  • Mention any connection you have to the institution or region where the position is located.
  • Proofread your letter carefully before sending it off.
  • Follow up with a phone call or email after you have submitted your application to express your continued interest in the position.

By following these tips, you can write an effective research cover letter that will increase your chances of being selected for an interview.

Related: What is Cover Letter? Complete Guide To Get any Job.

When it comes to applying for a research position, your cover letter is your first impression. You want to make sure it’s strong enough to convince the hiring manager to take a closer look at your application.

The best way to do this is to use a research cover letter sample as a guide. This will show you what kind of information to include in your letter, as well as how to format it for maximum impact.

When you’re ready to start writing, simply follow the instructions below. Choose a research cover letter sample that best fits your needs and customize it with your own qualifications and experiences. Be sure to proofread your letter carefully before sending it off – you want to make sure it’s perfect!

Best of luck in your job search!

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Free Cover Letter for Research Position Sample

The cover letter for research position is an effective way to make your job application. With a well written research cover letter you will easily grab the attention of the hiring manager and compel them to want to read your resume. With the following research associate cover letter sample and tips you can persuade the screener that you deserve an interview.

  • # Cover Letter for Research Position Template
  • # Cover Letter for Research Position Sample
  • # Tips for Writing Cover Letter for Research Position
  • # How to Edit Cover Letter for Research Position Template

Research Position Cover Letter Template

research job cover letter

This is a free cover letter template for research job. Free Download and customize it according to the sample text below.

Supported formats

Cover letter for research position sample (text).

Roger Bailey 12 Stock Road, Mitchell,, SD 82030 Cell: (555) 098-09876 [email protected] May 14, 2018 Dr. Reginald Corke Technical Health University Fanning 3 Hakstaton Road Mitchell, SD 82434

Dear Dr. Corke,

I am writing to express interest in the Research Assistant advertised on Technical Health University Fanning's website.

I have recently concluded my PhD at the South Dakota University in “Technical Health and the Impact of Health Classes on Care Outcomes”. My PhD revolved around primary technical care research with health educators and patients culminating on diverse recommendations for county health educators. Prior to that I had completed Masters in Technical Health at Yale University and left with distinction.

The Research Assistant position is a great blend of my technical health evaluating abilities in teaching areas through statistical modeling and care commissioning criteria.

I have held three research assistant positions in county government and academia making me suited for the open position focusing on interface between technical health, educators and care givers. My unique evaluating experience on the impact of technical health in care giving on local groups at the county government has accorded me a unique understanding on practical technical health applications and policy on health educations among people. I was also able to comprehend advanced research and data analysis tools and techniques from ATLAS-Ti to SPSS while investigating the correlation between technical health structures, care and teaching outcomes.

At the county government health department I was a part of a team of collaborating researchers drawn from all nationalities, races and disciplines. This has deepened my confidence in intercultural skills and communicating my recommendations from my research. I also worked as the PhD liaison staff student for the department at South Dakota University where I learnt how to solve problems as they rise, deepen collaboration, build relationships, offer solutions and negotiate technical and practical solutions. It was through these skills that helped me during my three months internship to persuade the South Dakota County Educators Commission to not only get involved in my research project but also implement a number of recommendations and findings.

I am very confident that my experience and expertise in technical health and its impact in care and health teaching, vast experience in government and academic research, strong people and influencing skills and multidisciplinary approach make me ideal for the open role.

I would appreciate a chance to discuss this role further and how my experience meets your requirements. I look forward to meeting you in person shortly.

Sincerely, Roger Bailey (555) 098-09876

Tips for Writing Cover Letter for Research Position

Always send a cover letter for research position with your resume unless the position directly asks not to. Even if you've placed your CV or resume on an agency's database, submitting a cover letter is another chance to market your skills and improve your chances of getting the position.

Whether it's a research associate cover letter or any research job the write-up should be no more than a page. Be succinct to show the reader you can clearly and fluently explain yourself and your ideas. In-depth details can be offered later in an interview if you make it and through your resume/CV.

Ensures the paragraphs remains short and the typeface as easy and clear as possible to draw the brief attention span of the employer.

Salutation and address must be included. You need to address the research cover letter to an individual. Do a little research to establish who the hiring manager or the research group head is.

  • In the first paragraph explain introductorily the job you are interested in, where you read the posting or heard about the position and a short background about yourself in research matters and research background.
  • In the middle paragraphs use brief illustrations from your accomplishments and previous research to show how you meet the criteria of the research role.
  • In the final part of the cover letter for research job explain what draws you to the research role as advertised in the organization and how the position matches your career goals.
  • In the concluding paragraph conclude with a summary of what makes you perfect for the position and statement indicating your interest to meet in person or in an interview.

To effectively write a great cover letter pick the top 3-4 top requirements or criteria from the job posting and focus on them, giving evidence on each. In case the hiring manager or employer discovers you've fulfilled the top most criteria and you've exactly what they need in terms of skills, experience and credentials on sections that really matter, you definitely will be invited for an interview. The resume will explain other qualifications and competences and interview will conclude the rest.

Skills beyond research are also critical. The bulk of the cover letter for research paper will be displaying your expertise and depth in research and rationale for wanting to fill the role. However, don't make the mistake of many and forget to include other softer skills that the opening also requires. These include such skills as staff management, communication with individuals outside and within the company, writing winning funding proposals, project planning, use of certain research software and tools among others.

How to Edit Cover Letter for Research Position Template

Most research positions use PDF documents a lot in the daily work, so if you are applying for this kind of job, just submit your cover letter for research position as PDF. To edit your PDF cover letter, you need a powerful PDF editor, such as Wondershare PDFelement - PDF Editor . It is an all-in-one PDF solution to deal with any problems related to PDF files.

cover letter for research position

Step 1. Open the Cover Letter for Research Position Template

research cover letter

Step 2. Click on "Edit" and Enter Your Text as You Like

research associate cover letter

Step 3. Complete and Save Your Cover Letter for Research Position

cover letter for research job

Posted by Elise Williams to Updated: 2023-07-31 16:11:15

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How to write an effective cover letter (with samples)

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You will have to prepare a number of materials for employers while looking for a job. One type of document is the cover letter, which is included with your resume when requesting a job interview. An effective cover letter is directed towards a specific position or company, and describes examples from your experience that highlight your skills related to the role.

You want to convince the reader that your interest in the job and company are genuine and specific. You also want to demonstrate ways that your experience has prepared you for the role by sharing a few brief stories that highlight your qualifications. This takes time and research; use the job description and the company’s web site or LinkedIn page to identify traits and skills the company values.

Cover letter structure and format

A cover letter should be no longer than one page with a font size between 10-12 points. Be sure to include your contact information and address it directly to the hiring manager, using their name. If you are not sure who to address the letter to, write “Dear Hiring Manager.” If the role you are applying for has a reference number or code, be sure to include it in your letter so that human resources is able to accurately track your application. The reference code is usually included

Cover letters typically take the following structure:

Introduction (1st paragraph)

  • State clearly in your opening sentence the purpose for your letter and a brief professional introduction.
  • Specify why you are interested in that specific position and organization.
  • Provide an overview of the main strengths and skills you will bring to the role.

Example : I am a second year master’s student in MIT’s Technology and Policy Program (TPP) writing to apply for a consulting position in Navigant’s Emerging Technology & Business Strategy group. After speaking with John Smith at the MIT career fair, I realized that Navigant’s values of excellence, continuous development, entrepreneurial spirit, and integrity align with the principles that guide me every day and that have driven me throughout my career. Moreover, I believe that my knowledge of the energy sector, passion for data analysis, polished communication skills, and four years of consulting experience will enable me to deliver superior value for Navigant’s clients.

Body (2-3 paragraphs)

  • Cite a couple of examples from your experience that support your ability to be successful in the position or organization.
  • Try not to simply repeat your resume in paragraph form, complement your resume by offering a little more detail about key experiences.
  • Discuss what skills you have developed and connect these back to the target role.

Example : As a graduate student in MIT’s Technology and Policy Program, I spend every day at the cutting edge of the energy sector. In my capacity as an MIT Energy Initiative research assistant, I use statistical analysis to investigate trends in public acceptance and regulation related to emerging energy technologies. Graduate classes in data science, energy economics, energy ventures and strategy, and technology policy have prepared me to help Navigant offer the expert services that set it apart from competitors. Furthermore, I will bring Navigant the same leadership skills that I used as the student leader for the MIT Energy Conference’s Technology Commercialization round-table, and as the mentorship manager for the MIT Clean Energy Prize.

Even before MIT, my four years of work experience in consulting—first at LMN Research Group and then at XYZ Consulting—allowed me to develop the skillset that Navigant looks for in candidates. As a science writer and policy analyst at LMN Research Group, I developed superb technical writing and visual communication skills, as well as an ability to communicate and collaborate with clients at federal agencies such as EPA and DOE. As a research analyst at XYZ Consulting, I developed an in-depth understanding of data analysis, program evaluation, and policy design.

Closing (last paragraph)

  • Restate succinctly your interest in the role and why you are a good candidate.
  • Thank the reader for their time and consideration.

Example : I take pride in my skills and experience in several domains: critical thinking and analysis, communication, and leadership. I note that Navigant values these same ideals, and I very much hope to use my abilities in service of the firm and its clients. Thank you for your time and consideration, I look forward to speaking with you further about my qualifications.

Additional cover letter tips

  • Be sure that each cover letter is specifically tailored to the company you are writing to. Research the company to help you determine your approach. Check the company’s website and other resources online. You can also use MIT’s extensive alumni network through the Alumni Advisors Hub to seek first-hand knowledge, advice, and insight about the company.
  • Are you seeking a position in a field or industry that does not have an obvious parallel or connection to your academic training? Be explicit about why you are interested in that particular field, organization or job, and what value you bring. For example, if you are an electrical engineer applying to a finance or consulting position, highlight your quantitative skills and ability to problem-solve.
  • If you are applying for a summer job or internship and do not yet have any experience that is directly related to the position, focus on transferable skills that will add value to the role – leadership, communication, problem-solving, project management, etc.
  • Lastly, cover letters are a chance to demonstrate the communication skills necessary to most jobs. Careful composing and revision are essential. To put your best foot forward and ensure your cover letter will be effective, schedule an appointment with a CAPD career advisor.

IMAGES

  1. Research Cover Letter

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  2. Market Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample

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  3. Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample & Template for 2023

    research cover letter sample

  4. Professional Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample & Writing Guide

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  5. Sample Cover Letter For Research Paper Submission : Learn about writing

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  6. Cover Letter Sample For Academic Position

    research cover letter sample

VIDEO

  1. How to write a professional cover letter

  2. Cover letter (сопроводительное письмо к резюме) на английском: примеры, фразы, советы

  3. Cover Letter for Job Application With Experience

  4. Multi topic letters/9407_5404_1423

  5. Most Expected Questions Research Methodology|| BHU 2022 PhD entrance and UGC NET JRF PAPER 1

  6. How to write an amazing cover letter for Australian nursing job application.Best cover letter format

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Good Cover Letter for a Research Position

    First, they can probably figure out your name. You don't need that to be in the first sentence (or any of the sentences—the closing is an obvious enough spot). Next, "the open position" and "your company" are too generic. That sounds like the same cover letter you sent to every single employer in a hundred mile radius.

  2. How To Write a Cover Letter for a Research Paper (Plus Example)

    A cover letter for a research paper is a document submitted along with an academic or professional paper intended for publication. Learn how to format, write and structure a cover letter for a research paper with a template and example letter. Find out what to include, such as contact information, submission details, disclaimers and similar publications.

  3. How to write a cover letter for journal submission

    Extensive revisions. Get a quote What should my cover letter include? Before you start to write, please check the instructions for authors (IFAs) of your chosen journal, as not all journals will require one. You should also check the IFAs for any journal specific information on what to include.

  4. Researcher Cover Letter Example and Template for 2023

    Learn how to write a great cover letter for a job as a researcher, a professional who collects, analyzes and interprets data from various sources. See the requirements, qualifications, skills and duties of this profession, and get an example cover letter template to download.

  5. How to Write a Researcher Cover Letter (Plus Example)

    1. Introduce yourself Start your cover letter by introducing yourself with your full name and contact information. You can also add your website if you have one. It's important to include your contact information so that the employer can easily get in touch with you. 2. Add professional greetings

  6. Cover letters

    Cover Letters. The cover letter is a formal way to communicate with journal editors and editorial staff during the manuscript submission process. Most often, a cover letter is needed when authors initially submit their manuscript to a journal and when responding to reviewers during an invitation to revise and resubmit the manuscript.

  7. Researcher Cover Letter Examples & Samples for 2023

    4.4 / 5 ( 332 votes ) Featured in: Free Researcher cover letter example Dear Mr. Roberts: When I learned of your need for an experienced and analytical Researcher to join your team, I hastened to send you my resume.

  8. How To Write A Cover Letter For A Researcher (With Template)

    1. Add your contact information Start your cover letter by listing your first name, last name, phone number and email address. For your address, only mention the city and state or union territory. This allows hiring managers to contact you if they have questions about your application.

  9. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example and Template for 2023

    Dear hiring manager, I am excited to apply for the position of Research Assistant at Green Valley University, working on public policy. As a lifelong learner who recently graduated with a master's degree in public policy, I am interested in the prospect of working closely under Professor Adams to advance the aims of his research project.

  10. Example Cover Letters

    Example Cover Letters. Response to Stipulations Cover Letter: An example of a cover letter to respond to the IRB's request for modifications to a study, amendment or continuing review application. Amendment Cover Letter: An example for a cover letter to accompany a request to amend an approved study. The letter includes an example of the IRB's ...

  11. Research Analyst Cover Letter Example and Template 2023

    To upload the template into Google Docs, go to File > Open > and select the correct downloaded file. Research analyst cover letter purpose You may write a research analyst cover letter to: Discuss career-related skills

  12. Real Researcher Cover Letter Example for 2023

    Professional Researcher Cover Letter Example for 2023 Read for inspiration or use it as a base to improve your own Researcher cover letter. Just replace personal information, company application data and achievements with your own. Create a Cover Letter Read the Guide Vito Espinoza +1-555-0100 [email protected] COVER LETTER Dear John,

  13. How to Write a Great Research Assistant Cover Letter (Sample Included

    Part 1: Introduction Part 2: Understanding the purpose of a research assistant cover letter Part 3: Preparing to write an undergraduate research assistant cover letter Part 4: How to get a research assistant job when there are no RA job postings Part 5: Drafting an entry level research assistant cover letter

  14. Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample & Template for 2023

    Pick a cover letter template here. 3. Introduce Yourself and What Position You're Applying To. The objective of the first paragraph of your research assistant cover letter is simple: Tells them when your cover letter is relevant for the position. You'll need to address the hiring manager by name in your greeting.

  15. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

    Alex Reed 5508 Terrace Drive La Crescenta, CA, 91214 (818) 835-3371 [email protected] Dear Dr. Reed, I'm writing to you regarding the Lab Research Assistant position at BioSpace. I'm confident my academic background in molecular biology and biomedical research experience will make me a competent contributor to your team.

  16. Research Scientist Cover Letter (With Examples)

    Research Scientist Cover Letter (With Examples) While resumes are necessary for any complete job application, they only tell part of the story for many of us. On the other hand, cover letters share more about who you are as a person and why you would be a good fit for the job.

  17. How To Write a Successful Research Assistant Cover Letter

    1. Research the organization, researcher and project When writing a cover letter, it's important to make it specific to the position you're seeking. If you're applying for a role as a research assistant, try to mention the project or assignment you expect to work on specifically.

  18. 15 Research Scientist Cover Letters That Will Get Hired (NOW)

    Each cover letter is written with a different focus. Review all of them and pick the ones that apply to your situation. Take inspiration from multiple samples and combine them to craft your unique cover letter. Research Scientist Sample 1. I am a Research Scientist with an educational background in the natural sciences and I am interested in ...

  19. PDF CVs and Cover Letters

    RESEARCH EXPERIENCE . Professor LeVaughn King, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA . Research Assistant, May 2014 to September 2017 • Performed archival research on public official Edward J. Logue for forthcoming book. Professor Alexi Kovalev, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA . Research Assistant, September 2009 to June 2010 • Literature ...

  20. 7 Best Research cover letter Sample [Ready]

    7 Best Research cover letter Sample [Ready] 1 year ago by Jessica William Written by Jessica William When it comes to writing a cover letter for a research position, there are a few things you need to keep in mind. First, you want to make sure that your letter is addressed to the correct person.

  21. Free Cover Letter for Research Position Samples

    Cover Letter for Research Position Sample (Text) Roger Bailey 12 Stock Road, Mitchell,, SD 82030 Cell: (555) 098-09876 [email protected] May 14, 2018 Dr. Reginald Corke Technical Health University Fanning 3 Hakstaton Road Mitchell, SD 82434 Dear Dr. Corke,

  22. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Cover letter format. A cover letter should be formatted like a business letter with these sections: Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins.

  23. How to write an effective cover letter (with samples)

    This takes time and research; use the job description and the company's web site or LinkedIn page to identify traits and skills the company values. Cover letter structure and format. A cover letter should be no longer than one page with a font size between 10-12 points.

  24. CRediT author statement

    CRediT author statement. CRediT (Contributor Roles Taxonomy) was introduced with the intention of recognizing individual author contributions, reducing authorship disputes and facilitating collaboration. The idea came about following a 2012 collaborative workshop led by Harvard University and the Wellcome Trust, with input from researchers, the ...