ABLE blog: thoughts, learnings and experiences

  • Productivity
  • Thoughtful learning

Organizing information for writing: 7 effective methods to try

Organizing information for writing: 7 effective methods to try

Have you ever sat down to write a research paper for school, a report for work, or blog posts for your website, and poof — your mind went blank?

It can be tough to get started when you sit down to write, whether for school, work, or fun. You may have a lot of ideas floating around in your head but no clear sense of how to put them all together. That's where organization comes in.

Information organization is essential for writers. Whether you‘re writing creative fiction novels or the information architecture of web pages, organizing is a necessary step in the writing process. Using a framework allows us to sort our thoughts, identify the key points we want to convey, and arrange the piece in a structure that will flow logically and compellingly.

If you want to strengthen your writing and produce compelling pieces that flow every time, this guide is for you. Explore what organizing means for writers, why it's important, and seven methods of organizing information that you can try to create your best writing yet.

What does organizing information mean?

We're all familiar with organizing — we use it to keep our homes tidy, plan a road vacation, and complete work projects. Everything around us is specifically arranged naturally or artificially, from the shelves of your local market to the self-organized fairy circles in Australia . As essential as organization is for order in our world, it's equally crucial to create order in our writing.

Proper organization begins with a framework — after all, it's not really organizing if there’s no method to how you're sorting things. Many forms of organization are found in everyday life, from sparking joy with Marie Kondo to the Dewey Decimal Classification system at the library.

But what about organizing digital notes, research bibliographies, or even abstract thoughts and ideas?

Many academic greats have formulated frameworks and systems for organizing information. Information design forefather Richard Saul Wurman developed the "Five Hat Racks," also known as the LATCH system. LATCH is an acronym for:

According to Wurman, LATCH is the only method for organizing any kind of information, regardless of the form or amount of information. In his book "Information Architects," Wurman says, "I've tried a thousand times to find other ways to organize, but I always end up using one of these five."

Wurman, in essence, condensed our instinctual tendency to group things into categories that are logical for categorization. His method is the foundation for many other methods.

The Inverted Pyramid method , for example, is constructed based on the principle of hierarchy. This reporting style emphasizes the story's who, when, where, why, and how, starting with the most essential facts and presenting them in decreasing order.

Why is organizing information important for writers?

Organizing information: notebook, pencil, glasses, keyboard and a cup of coffee

In the same way that journalists use the Inverted Pyramid structure when writing news stories and press releases, writers also need an organizational style.

In any piece of writing, organization is a crucial factor that determines its effectiveness. Without a clear organizational pattern, your audience could become confused and lose interest.

You can organize your writing by using your critical thinking skills to view your writing from your reader's perspective. Here are a few questions you may want to consider:

  • What is important to my reader?
  • Why are they reading this?
  • What information do they need?
  • Are they seeking specific information?
  • What is their personality (for example, do they get information anxiety)?

Knowing your reader will allow you to write so that it makes sense to them. For example, someone reading an instruction manual looking for specific directions to fix their bicycle is unlikely to read an introductory paragraph about your biking adventures. The vast majority of users will skip straight to the piece of information they need. If they have to wade through a large amount of information, they will likely go to another resource.

On the other hand, let’s say you're writing a casual blog article for expectant mothers to describe what to expect during childbirth. An approach with optimism and relatable stories that leads to the big moment will be better appreciated than a blunt timeline laced with sometimes-scary medical jargon.

what is organization in creative writing

Forget about trying to "find it again" - it's all at your fingertips, meaningfully organised in one app.

ABLE - the next-level all-in-one knowledge acquisition and productivity tool.

7 methods for organizing information in writing

Although some writers can produce flawless pieces seemingly effortlessly, most need to plan their writing ahead of time. In addition to structuring our thoughts and setting clear objectives, it's essential to organize the content to ensure that the message is as focused as possible.

You can structure your writing in many ways. Some writers use worksheets or templates, and others organize using an outline or other framework. Certain formats are best suited for specific purposes, so it’s helpful to be familiar with a few. Here are seven proven methods for organizing your next writing project.

1. Chronologically

Calendar and a pencil

Chronological order is probably the most straightforward form of organization, as it simply involves ordering information by time. In this format, each section or paragraph builds on the previous one. Stories, biographies, and historical accounts are often written using this method.

The method is effective because readers can easily follow and process information in the order it is presented. It can also create a feeling of anticipation or suspense, as readers are eager to discover what happens next.

To use the chronological method of organizing information , simply arrange the points you want to discuss according to their order in time. It might be helpful to group events together by decades or centuries if your piece covers an extended period.

2. Order of importance

The order of importance is another popular method for organizing information and is often used for essays, speeches, and other persuasive writing. In this type of organization, you arrange your main points from most important to least important, or vice versa.

This method effectively makes a convincing argument, allowing you to start strong with your best points and end with a bang. By gradually increasing the intensity of your language, you can also stir up emotion in your reader.

To use the order of importance method, first decide which points are the most crucial to your argument or message. You can then arrange them in whatever order you feel will have the most impact. Just make sure you begin and end with your strongest points.

The spatial method of organization is often used for descriptions, whether it be of a person, place, or thing. In this type of writing, you arrange your information according to how it appears in space. This could be from left to right, top to bottom, or even in a circle.

The key to using the spatial method successfully is to be as straightforward as possible in your writing. You want your reader to be able to easily visualize what you are describing, so use plenty of concrete details and images.

To use the spatial method, start by brainstorming the points you want to include in your description. You can then arrange them in the most appropriate order for the subject matter. For example, if you describe a room, you would probably start with the walls and move on to the floor, furniture, and other features.

4. Compare and contrast

The compare and contrast method is just as it sounds — you compare and contrast two or more subjects — to highlight the similarities and differences between two ideas, people, or things. This method is sometimes used with the goal of the reader choosing one or the other subject, but sometimes the purpose is simply to educate.

This method of organization can be particularly effective in persuading your reader to see a topic in a new light. It can also help clarify your thoughts on a subject by forcing you to consider it from multiple angles.

To use the compare and contrast method, identify what is similar and what is different between your subjects, and create a list of all the relevant matters you want to include. Once you have your list, decide how to present your points. You can alternate between similarities and differences or group them together by relatedness.

5. Problem and solution

Paper airplane solving a maze

The problem and solution method of organization consists of two sections, a description of the problem and an explanation of the solution. Arguments and persuasive pieces frequently use this format to demonstrate problem-solving skills and show why a particular course of action is best.

The purpose of this method is to provide the reader with plausible evidence to influence their opinion or behavior. You can gain their trust by showing your reader that you are aware of their problems and have credible solutions.

To use this method, first identify the problem you want to discuss and detail the issues. In a new section, present the solution and explain how it can be implemented. Be sure to provide details and supporting evidence for your claims.

6. Cause and effect

The cause and effect method focuses on the reasons for and the results of a given topic. This type of organization is commonly used to simplify the process of explaining complicated concepts and events, using one section to detail the cause and another to describe the effect. This highlights the key relationships between the two concisely and logically.

Using this method is an effective way to incite action because it clearly shows the direct impact of your subject. The technique can also be used to support predictions of what may happen in the future based on past events. Many find this approach helpful in making decisions , as it can provide a clear and logical path forward.

To use the cause and effect method of organizing information, determine what caused the problem or situation. Then examine the results. You can then structure your writing in one of two ways:

  • Explain all the causes in one section, then explain the effects in the next part
  • Include several smaller subcategories that focus on a specific concern and its causes and consequences

7. Sequentially

The sequential method structures your writing by presenting information in a step-by-step fashion. This method is often used for instructions or manuals, as it can provide clear and concise directions. It can also be used to build anticipation by gradually revealing information.

This method is effective in helping readers understand complex processes by breaking them down into smaller, more manageable pieces. It can also help to ensure that your instructions are followed correctly, as each step builds on the last.

To use the sequential method:

  • Start by brainstorming all the steps involved in completing the task
  • List them in the order they need to be completed
  • Explain how each step should be completed
  • Include any necessary information, such as the tools or materials required

Bonus: Topical Method

A thorough look at methods of writing organization deserves a nod at the topical approach, which is often the method used when nothing else quite fits. Interestingly, it's also the method that is often used in academic and informational writing, as it allows you to explore a topic in depth.

The topical method begins with brainstorming the points you would like to cover during your discussion. Create an outline based on the topic and type of information, ordering it as you see fit. When writing an academic or scientific report , the structure consists of four parts — an executive summary, an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Finally, conduct any necessary research and write your content for each section.

Boost your writing with ABLE

Highlight, annotate or take notes from anywhere, and it's easily linked to a selected topic in your Knowledge Base. Forget about trying to "find it again" - it's all at your fingertips, meaningfully organized in one app.

Organizing information is one piece of the writing puzzle

One of the best ways to ensure that your reader understands your writing is to structure clear and concise information. These seven methods of organizing information will help keep your work organized. But remember that organization is only one piece of the writing puzzle.

The key to good writing is fitting the pieces together to make the most of the end goal — how the reader responds to it. Whether you want your reader to walk away with knowledge or tears in their eyes, how your readers react to your work will ultimately determine your writing success.

I hope you have enjoyed reading this article. Feel free to share, recommend and connect 🙏

Connect with me on Twitter 👉   https://twitter.com/iamborisv

And follow Able's journey on Twitter: https://twitter.com/meet_able

And subscribe to our newsletter to read more valuable articles before it gets published on our blog.

Now we're building a Discord community of like-minded people, and we would be honoured and delighted to see you there.

Erin E. Rupp

Erin E. Rupp

Read more posts by this author

Self-directed learning: 3 steps to success

The optimal experience: how to get into a flow state in 7 steps.

What is abstract thinking? 10 activities to improve your abstract thinking skills

What is abstract thinking? 10 activities to improve your abstract thinking skills

5 examples of cognitive learning theory (and how you can use them)

5 examples of cognitive learning theory (and how you can use them)

0 results found.

  • Aegis Alpha SA
  • We build in public

Building with passion in

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Organization and Structure

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

There is no single organizational pattern that works well for all writing across all disciplines; rather, organization depends on what you’re writing, who you’re writing it for, and where your writing will be read. In order to communicate your ideas, you’ll need to use a logical and consistent organizational structure in all of your writing. We can think about organization at the global level (your entire paper or project) as well as at the local level (a chapter, section, or paragraph). For an American academic situation, this means that at all times, the goal of revising for organization and structure is to consciously design your writing projects to make them easy for readers to understand. In this context, you as the writer are always responsible for the reader's ability to understand your work; in other words, American academic writing is writer-responsible. A good goal is to make your writing accessible and comprehensible to someone who just reads sections of your writing rather than the entire piece. This handout provides strategies for revising your writing to help meet this goal.

Note that this resource focuses on writing for an American academic setting, specifically for graduate students. American academic writing is of course not the only standard for academic writing, and researchers around the globe will have different expectations for organization and structure. The OWL has some more resources about writing for American and international audiences here .

Whole-Essay Structure

While organization varies across and within disciplines, usually based on the genre, publication venue, and other rhetorical considerations of the writing, a great deal of academic writing can be described by the acronym IMRAD (or IMRaD): Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. This structure is common across most of the sciences and is often used in the humanities for empirical research. This structure doesn't serve every purpose (for instance, it may be difficult to follow IMRAD in a proposal for a future study or in more exploratory writing in the humanities), and it is often tweaked or changed to fit a particular situation. Still, its wide use as a base for a great deal of scholarly writing makes it worthwhile to break down here.

  • Introduction : What is the purpose of the study? What were the research questions? What necessary background information should the reader understand to help contextualize the study? (Some disciplines include their literature review section as part of the introduction; some give the literature review its own heading on the same level as the other sections, i.e., ILMRAD.) Some writers use the CARS model to help craft their introductions more effectively.
  • Methods: What methods did the researchers use? How was the study conducted? If the study included participants, who were they, and how were they selected?
  • Results : This section lists the data. What did the researchers find as a result of their experiments (or, if the research is not experimental, what did the researchers learn from the study)? How were the research questions answered?
  • Discussion : This section places the data within the larger conversation of the field. What might the results mean? Do these results agree or disagree with other literature cited? What should researchers do in the future?

Depending on your discipline, this may be exactly the structure you should use in your writing; or, it may be a base that you can see under the surface of published pieces in your field, which then diverge from the IMRAD structure to meet the expectations of other scholars in the field. However, you should always check to see what's expected of you in a given situation; this might mean talking to the professor for your class, looking at a journal's submission guidelines, reading your field's style manual, examining published examples, or asking a trusted mentor. Every field is a little different.

Outlining & Reverse Outlining

One of the most effective ways to get your ideas organized is to write an outline. A traditional outline comes as the pre-writing or drafting stage of the writing process. As you make your outline, think about all of the concepts, topics, and ideas you will need to include in order to accomplish your goal for the piece of writing. This may also include important citations and key terms. Write down each of these, and then consider what information readers will need to know in order for each point to make sense. Try to arrange your ideas in a way that logically progresses, building from one key idea or point to the next.

Questions for Writing Outlines

  • What are the main points I am trying to make in this piece of writing?
  • What background information will my readers need to understand each point? What will novice readers vs. experienced readers need to know?
  • In what order do I want to present my ideas? Most important to least important, or least important to most important? Chronologically? Most complex to least complex? According to categories? Another order?

Reverse outlining comes at the drafting or revision stage of the writing process. After you have a complete draft of your project (or a section of your project), work alone or with a partner to read your project with the goal of understanding the main points you have made and the relationship of these points to one another. The OWL has another resource about reverse outlining here.

Questions for Writing Reverse Outlines

  • What topics are covered in this piece of writing?
  • In what order are the ideas presented? Is this order logical for both novice and experienced readers?
  • Is adequate background information provided for each point, making it easy to understand how one idea leads to the next?
  • What other points might the author include to further develop the writing project?

Organizing at the sentence and paragraph level

Signposting.

Signposting is the practice of using language specifically designed to help orient readers of your text. We call it signposting because this practice is like leaving road signs for a driver — it tells your reader where to go and what to expect up ahead. Signposting includes the use of transitional words and phrasing, and they may be explicit or more subtle. For example, an explicit signpost might say:

This section will cover Topic A­­ and Topic B­­­­­.

A more subtle signpost might look like this:

It's important to consider the impact of Topic A­­ and Topic B­­­­­.

The style of signpost you use will depend on the genre of your paper, the discipline in which you are writing, and your or your readers’ personal preferences. Regardless of the style of signpost you select, it’s important to include signposts regularly. They occur most frequently at the beginnings and endings of sections of your paper. It is often helpful to include signposts at mid-points in your project in order to remind readers of where you are in your argument.

Questions for Identifying and Evaluating Signposts

  • How and where does the author include a phrase, sentence, or short group of sentences that explains the purpose and contents of the paper?
  • How does each section of the paper provide a brief summary of what was covered earlier in the paper?
  • How does each section of the paper explain what will be covered in that section?
  • How does the author use transitional words and phrases to guide readers through ideas (e.g. however, in addition, similarly, nevertheless, another, while, because, first, second, next, then etc.)?

WORKS CONSULTED

Clark, I. (2006). Writing the successful thesis and dissertation: Entering the conversation . Prentice Hall Press.

Davis, M., Davis, K. J., & Dunagan, M. (2012). Scientific papers and presentations . Academic press.

Table of Contents

Collaboration, information literacy, writing process, organization.

  • © 2023 by Joseph M. Moxley - University of South Florida

Organization refers to the arrangement of content (e.g., headings/subheadings , parts/sections of a text , ideas, arguments , stories, steps , evidence ) into a deliberate order in speech, writing, and visual discourse. Organization refers to a writer or speaker's efforts during composing to interpret and sort information in ways that are most likely to achieve their aims while being responsive to their audience's mindset about the topic . Learn about the organizational patterns that people use to communicate so you can discern the most appropriate way to organize your communications.

what is organization in creative writing

Organization Definition

Organization may refer to

  • the methods — the organizational patterns — that writers use to structure their compositions
  • different aims of discourse
  • whether or not  phrases ,  sentences ,  paragraphs   cohere  with one another
  • whether or not a writer has established a through-line
  • the expectations that members of a  discourse community  share with one another about the best way to organize a  composition
  • a step in the writing process , a composing strategy
  • evaluative criteria for assessing the appropriateness and quality of a text’s organizational structure
  • a group of people who are working collaboratively to achieve a purpose ; a business; an organization.

In written discourse , organization functions at two levels:

  • Example: to create a cohesive feel writers often introduce their thesis or research question in an abstract , introduction , and at the beginning of the each new section of a document. Subsequently, as they introduce new information, they relate it to the old information as well as the thesis, research question , theory, or hypothesis.
  • In standard written English , writers organize words , phrases , and clauses into sentences following the rules of grammar and mechanics and principles of style .

Synonymous Terms

Organization may also be called

  • Logical Flow
  • Logical Structure
  • Organizational Structure
  • Appeals to Ethos, Pathos

Related Concepts: Genre ; Felt Sense ; Gestalt ; Information Architecture ; Organizational Patterns ; Rhetorical Analysis ; Rhetorical Stance ; Unity

what is organization in creative writing

Why Does Organization Matter?

In our contemporary information ecosystem, attracting the attention of your audience can be challenging. Then, once you get the reader’s attention, you must work to keep their interest.

Texts that are well organized are more likely to be read and understood than those that are disorganized. For instance, you are likely to lose your reader the moment you introduce information into your text that is superfluous. If you fail to substantiate a claim with substantive evidence or if you bring in new information that is unrelated to the existing information , your readers are likely to turn their attention elsewhere.

Readers can be fickle. At any moment you make an organizational blunder, your readers may turn away from the text you wrote to pull up Amazon and do some shopping or Netflix to watch a movie. There are, as you know, a universe of distractions.

Thus, during prewriting , revising , and editing — during the very act of composing — you want to continue evaluating the organizational patterns you’ve used in a composition .

8 Definitions of Organization

1. organization may refer to the methods — the organizational patterns — that writers use to structure their compositions ..

Organization refers to the arrangement of content (e.g., headings/subheadings , parts/sections of a text , ideas, arguments, stories, steps, evidence) into a deliberate order in speech, writing, and visual discourse.

Writers have many organizational patterns to choose from. For example, writers may organize a paragraph , a collection of paragraphs , or an entire document using the following organizational patterns:

  • Causal Order (aka Cause and Effect)
  • Chronological Order
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Deductive Order
  • Emphatic Order (aka Order of Importance)
  • Inductive Order (aka Climatic Order)
  • Logical Order
  • Problem and Solution Order
  • Instructions or Process Order (aka Sequential Order)
  • Spatial Order

2. Organization may refer to different aims of discourse

The organization of a text reflects a writer’s aims . Different discourse aims invoke different organizational patterns . For instance, you would organize an argument about a red light ticket differently than you would organize a wedding speech at your best friend’s wedding or a lengthy recommendation report .

Organization, like style , is a reflection of a writer’s content. Different aims of discourse call for different organizational patterns , as suggested by the table below.

3. Organization may refer to whether or not phrases , sentences , paragraphs cohere with one another.

At the local level, coherence refers to how well phrases , sentences , paragraphs , and sections flow together to produce meaning. Across communities of practice , people expect writers to produce sentences and paragraphs that relate to one another. In school and workplace writing, sentences and paragraphs that jump from one idea to another are viewed to be writer-based rather than reader-based .

At the global level , you can create coherence in your texts by

  • clarifying your purpose for writing
  • explaining how a document is organized — it’s organizational structure
  • explicitly introducing the argument, thesis, theory, hypothesis, research question that unifies the composition
  • explicitly explaining how new evidence relates to the previous discussion and the unifying thesis.

4. Organization may refer to whether or not a writer has established a through-line

A through-line is a metaphor. In this metaphor the through-line represents the line of logical reasoning and rhetorical reasoning that runs through a paper. In this organizational pattern , the writer

  • introduces their purpose for writing
  • describes the parts of a composition as it relates to their purpose (e.g., Table of Contents, Abstract , Executive Summary
  • maintains a coherent purpose , voice , tone , and line of reasoning throughout the introduction , body, conclusion , and references

Compositions with a through-line may be described as

  • professional
  • logical, well structured.

5. Organization may refer to the expectations that members of a discourse community share with one another about the best way to organize a composition .

Organization is a social process. Together, writers and readers are members of a discourse community . They share expectations about how to tackle problems. They share tools, including a lexis (i.e., specialized vocabulary ), grammar , and mechanics (e.g., conventions for spelling , emphasis, and punctuation ). They share an archive , a textual history, and a canon –an intellectual tradition of works that contributed substantively to human knowledge .

Textual expectations — which are reflected in the discourse conventions of particular discourse communities — are grounded in the textual practices of a discipline. For instance, the texts of professionals trained in finance are likely to engage in a great deal of quantitative analysis whereas the texts of professionals in history are more likely to engage in historiographical analysis, perhaps explicating different texts in an archive .

Disciplines, such as business, legal, and science communities, share unique citation methods , genres , research methods , and media . A good part of becoming credentialed in a discipline is mastering its textual practices. Taken as a whole, those textual practices function as a form of organization. Thus, it’s not surprising that one of the first moves most writers make is looking for exemplars. When faced with an exigency, a call to write, shrewd writers engage in strategic searching to identify exemplars and better understand the status of a scholarly conversation on a topic .

6. Organization may refer to a step in the writing process , a composing strategy

In the Writing Studies community , organization is perceived to be a step in the writing process : In the simplest models of composing, organization follows prewriting and drafting, but comes before revision and editing .

During composing , writers focus on the organization of their ideas. To communicate with others, writers understand they need to organize their message so that it meets the expectations of their audience(s) . In workplace writing contexts where audiences are not reading for pleasure as they would a novel but instead are trying to extract the gist from every message as quickly as possible, writers are eager to

  • organize their works at the local level so that they are as concise , clear , simple and unified as as possible
  • organize information deductively rather than inductively
  • organize information visually , using infographics and other information visualizations as well as headings and subheadings so the document is scannable
  • organize citations according to the order prescribed by a citation style such as APA or MLA .

In turn, in academic writing contexts , writers organize their works according to the prevailing writing style of other academic authors. For instance, Swales & Feak (1990) researched the rhetorical moves that academic writers make in peer-reviewed research articles. They found that authors are likely to make these three moves, often on page one of their articles:

  • Move 1 Establishing a territory
  • Move 2 Establishing a niche
  • Move 3 Occupying the niche.
  • Authority (in Speech and Writing)
  • Authority is Constructed & Contextual

7. Organization may refer to evaluative criteria for assessing the appropriateness and quality of a text’s organizational structure

In school settings, teachers often grade papers for organization. In work settings, poor organization leads to lost clients and revenue. (The table below presents 4 columns, moving from Inadequate to Exceeds Expectations . You may need to use your mouse to slide over and see the 3rd and 4th columns.)

8. Organization may refer to a group of people who are working collaboratively to achieve aims:

“Organization is working together in a coordinated way to achieve goals. All social species, such as bees, ants and apes, organize, and humans have done so since prehistoric times. Organization allowed individuals to specialize and increase efficiency. The development of economies and institutions led to trade between organizations, and eventually globalization. It is difficult to directly compare an organization with the act of organizing. Organizations can be thought of in many different ways, such as machines, living organisms, cultures, and psychic prisons” (Hatch 2011).

Hatch, Mary Jo,  ‘What is organization?’ ,  Organizations: A Very Short Introduction , Very Short Introductions  ( Oxford,  2011;  online edn,  Oxford Academic , 24 Sept. 2013 ),  https://doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199584536.003.0001 ,  accessed 6 Mar. 2023. Swales, J. & C. Feak (2004).  Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills . 2. udgave. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press

Related Articles:

Organizational Patterns

Organizational Patterns

Organizational Structures

Organizational Structures

Sentence schemas, suggested edits.

  • Please select the purpose of your message. * - Corrections, Typos, or Edits Technical Support/Problems using the site Advertising with Writing Commons Copyright Issues I am contacting you about something else
  • Your full name
  • Your email address *
  • Page URL needing edits *
  • Email This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Organizational Patterns

  • Joseph M. Moxley

Organizational Structures

Featured Articles

Student engrossed in reading on her laptop, surrounded by a stack of books

Academic Writing – How to Write for the Academic Community

what is organization in creative writing

Professional Writing – How to Write for the Professional World

what is organization in creative writing

Authority – How to Establish Credibility in Speech & Writing

Logo for Idaho Pressbooks Consortium

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

This chapter is about the importance of organizing a draft with a clear outline. This step is sometimes combined with the previous step in the writing process—developing a thesis statement. Some writers find it helpful to first jot down their main ideas in outline form, and then use that visual to help develop an overarching thesis statement. Ultimately, moving from thesis statement to outline is dynamic: writers often develop an initial hunch, work out the kinds through an outline, and then revise the thesis each point becomes more obviously structured. This chapter, “Organize,” will stress the importance of planning and structure in the writing process.

visual of the writing process

The Importance of Organization

Your prewriting activities and readings have helped you gather information for your assignment. The more you sort through the pieces of information you found, the more you will begin to see the connections between them. Patterns and gaps may begin to stand out. But only when you start to organize your ideas will you be able to translate your raw insights into a form that will communicate meaning to your audience.

When you write, you need to organize your ideas in an order that makes sense. The writing you complete in all your courses exposes how analytically and critically your mind works. In some courses, the only direct contact you may have with your instructor is through the assignments you write for the course. You can make a good impression by spending time ordering your ideas.

Order refers to your choice of what to present first, second, third, and so on in your writing. The order you pick closely relates to your purpose for writing that particular assignment. For example, when telling a story, it may be important to first describe the background for the action. Or you may need to first describe a 3-D movie projector or a television studio to help readers visualize the setting and scene. You may want to group your support effectively to convince readers that your point of view on an issue is well reasoned and worthy of belief.

In longer pieces of writing, you may organize different parts in different ways so that your purpose stands out clearly and all parts of the paper work together to consistently develop your main point.

Methods of Organizing Writing

The three common methods of organizing writing are  chronological order ,  spatial order , and  order of importance . You need to keep these methods of organization in mind as you plan how to arrange the information you have gathered in an outline. An outline is a written plan that serves as a skeleton for the paragraphs you write. Later, when you draft paragraphs in the next stage of the writing process, you will add support to create “flesh” and “muscle” for your assignment.

When you write, your goal is not only to complete an assignment but also to write for a specific purpose—perhaps to inform, to explain, to persuade, or for a combination of these purposes. Your purpose for writing should always be in the back of your mind, because it will help you decide which pieces of information belong together and how you will order them. In other words, choose the order that will most effectively fit your purpose and support your main point.

Table “Order versus Purpose” shows the connection between order and purpose.

For an essay question on a test or a brief oral presentation in class, all you may need to prepare is a short, informal outline in which you jot down key ideas in the order you will present them. This kind of outline reminds you to stay focused in a stressful situation and to include all the good ideas that help you explain or prove your point.

For a longer assignment, like an essay or a research paper, many college instructors require students to submit a  formal outline  before writing a major paper as a way to be sure you are on the right track and are working in an organized manner. A formal outline is a detailed guide that shows how all your supporting ideas relate to each other. It helps you distinguish between ideas that are of equal importance and ones that are of lesser importance. You build your paper based on the framework created by the outline.

Instructors may also require you to submit an outline with your final draft to check the direction of the assignment and the logic of your final draft. If you are required to submit an outline with the final draft of a paper, remember to revise the outline to reflect any changes you made while writing the paper.

Topic and sentence outlines

There are two types of formal outlines: the topic outline and the sentence outline. You format both types of formal outlines in the same way.

  • Place your introduction and thesis statement at the beginning, under roman numeral I.
  • Use roman numerals (II, III, IV, V, etc.) to identify main points that develop the thesis statement.
  • Use capital letters (A, B, C, D, etc.) to divide your main points into parts.
  • Use arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc.) if you need to subdivide any As, Bs, or Cs into smaller parts.
  • End with the final roman numeral expressing your idea for your conclusion.

Here is what the skeleton of a traditional formal outline looks like. The indention helps clarify how the ideas are related.

Introduction

Thesis statement

Main point 1 →  becomes the topic sentence of body paragraph 1

Main point 2 →  becomes the topic sentence of body paragraph 2

Main point 3 →  becomes the topic sentence of body paragraph 3

In an outline, any supporting detail can be developed with subpoints. For simplicity, the model shows them only under the first main point.

Formal outlines are often quite rigid in their organization. As many instructors will specify, you cannot subdivide one point if it is only one part. For example, for every roman numeral I, there must be a For every A, there must be a B. For every arabic numeral 1, there must be a 2. See for yourself on the sample outlines that follow.

Topic outlines

A topic outline is the same as a sentence outline except you use words or phrases instead of complete sentences. Words and phrases keep the outline short and easier to comprehend. All the headings, however, must be written in parallel structure.

Here is the topic outline that Mariah constructed for the essay she is developing. Her purpose is to inform, and her audience is a general audience of her fellow college students. Notice how Mariah begins with her thesis statement. She then arranges her main points and supporting details in outline form using short phrases in parallel grammatical structure.

Mariah's outline for her essay

Writing an Effective Topic Outline

This checklist can help you write an effective topic outline for your assignment. It will also help you discover where you may need to do additional reading or prewriting.

  • Do I have a controlling idea that guides the development of the entire piece of writing?
  • Do I have three or more main points that I want to make in this piece of writing? Does each main point connect to my controlling idea?
  • Is my outline in the best order—chronological order, spatial order, or order of importance—for me to present my main points? Will this order help me get my main point across?
  • Do I have supporting details that will help me inform, explain, or prove my main points?
  • Do I need to add more support? If so, where?
  • Do I need to make any adjustments in my working thesis statement before I consider it the final version?

Writing at Work

Word processing programs generally have an automatic numbering feature that can be used to prepare outlines. This feature automatically sets indents and lets you use the tab key to arrange information just as you would in an outline. Although in business this style might be acceptable, in college your instructor might have different requirements. Teach yourself how to customize the levels of outline numbering in your word-processing program to fit your instructor’s preferences.

Exercise 4.1

Using the working thesis statement you wrote in the previous chapter, “Thesis Statements,” and the results of your brainstorming from “Generating Ideas,” construct a topic outline for your essay. Be sure to observe correct outline form, including correct indentions and the use of Roman and arabic numerals and capital letters.

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your outline. Point out areas of interest from their outline and what you would like to learn more about.

Sentence Outlines

A sentence outline is the same as a topic outline except you use complete sentences instead of words or phrases. Complete sentences create clarity and can advance you one step closer to a draft in the writing process.

Here is the sentence outline that Mariah constructed for the essay she is developing.

An updated sentence outline

The information compiled under each roman numeral will become a paragraph in your final paper. In the previous example, the outline follows the standard five-paragraph essay arrangement, but longer essays will require more paragraphs and thus more roman numerals. If you think that a paragraph might become too long or stringy, add an additional paragraph to your outline, renumbering the main points appropriately.

PowerPoint presentations, used both in schools and in the workplace, are organized in a way very similar to formal outlines. PowerPoint presentations often contain information in the form of talking points that the presenter develops with more details and examples than are contained on the PowerPoint slide.

Exercise 4.2

Expand the topic outline you prepared in the previous execise to make it a sentence outline. In this outline, be sure to include multiple supporting points for your main topic even if your topic outline does not contain them. Be sure to observe correct outline form, including correct indentations and the use of Roman and arabic numerals and capital letters.

Key Takeaways

  • Writers must put their ideas in order so the assignment makes sense. The most common orders are chronological order, spatial order, and order of importance.
  • After gathering and evaluating the information you found for your essay, the next step is to write a working, or preliminary, thesis statement.
  • The working thesis statement expresses the main idea that you want to develop in the entire piece of writing. It can be modified as you continue the writing process.
  • Effective writers prepare a formal outline to organize their main ideas and supporting details in the order they will be presented.
  • A topic outline uses words and phrases to express the ideas.
  • A sentence outline uses complete sentences to express the ideas.
  • The writer’s thesis statement begins the outline, and the outline ends with suggestions for the concluding paragraph.

Write What Matters Copyright © 2020 by Liza Long; Amy Minervini; and Joel Gladd is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book

Logo for Open Oregon Educational Resources

Organizing Your Writing

Writing for Success

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how and why organizational techniques help writers and readers stay focused.
  • Assess how and when to use chronological order to organize an essay.
  • Recognize how and when to use order of importance to organize an essay.
  • Determine how and when to use spatial order to organize an essay.

The method of organization you choose for your essay is just as important as its content. Without a clear organizational pattern, your reader could become confused and lose interest. The way you structure your essay helps your readers draw connections between the body and the thesis, and the structure also keeps you focused as you plan and write the essay. Choosing your organizational pattern before you outline ensures that each body paragraph works to support and develop your thesis.

This section covers three ways to organize body paragraphs:

  • Chronological order
  • Order of importance
  • Spatial order

When you begin to draft your essay, your ideas may seem to flow from your mind in a seemingly random manner. Your readers, who bring to the table different backgrounds, viewpoints, and ideas, need you to clearly organize these ideas in order to help process and accept them.

A solid organizational pattern gives your ideas a path that you can follow as you develop your draft. Knowing how you will organize your paragraphs allows you to better express and analyze your thoughts. Planning the structure of your essay before you choose supporting evidence helps you conduct more effective and targeted research.

CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER

Chronological arrangement (also called “time order,”) has the following purposes:

  • To explain the history of an event or a topic
  • To tell a story or relate an experience
  • To explain how to do or to make something
  • To explain the steps in a process

Chronological order is mostly used in expository writing, which is a form of writing that narrates, describes, informs, or explains a process. When using chronological order, arrange the events in the order that they actually happened, or will happen if you are giving instructions. This method requires you to use words such as first, second, then, after that, later, and finally. These transition words guide you and your reader through the paper as you expand your thesis.

For example, if you are writing an essay about the history of the airline industry, you would begin with its conception and detail the essential timeline events up until present day. You would follow the chain of events using words such as first, then, next, and so on.

WRITING AT WORK

At some point in your career you may have to file a complaint with your human resources department. Using chronological order is a useful tool in describing the events that led up to your filing the grievance. You would logically lay out the events in the order that they occurred using the key transition words. The more logical your complaint, the more likely you will be well received and helped.

Choose an accomplishment you have achieved in your life. The important moment could be in sports, schooling, or extracurricular activities. On your own sheet of paper, list the steps you took to reach your goal. Try to be as specific as possible with the steps you took. Pay attention to using transition words to focus your writing.

Keep in mind that chronological order is most appropriate for the following purposes:

  • Writing essays containing heavy research
  • Writing essays with the aim of listing, explaining, or narrating
  • Writing essays that analyze literary works such as poems, plays, or books

When using chronological order, your introduction should indicate the information you will cover and in what order, and the introduction should also establish the relevance of the information. Your body paragraphs should then provide clear divisions or steps in chronology. You can divide your paragraphs by time (such as decades, wars, or other historical events) or by the same structure of the work you are examining (such as a line-by-line explication of a poem).

On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph that describes a process you are familiar with and can do well. Assume that your reader is unfamiliar with the procedure. Remember to use the chronological key words, such as first, second, then, and finally.

ORDER OF IMPORTANCE

Order of importance is best used for the following purposes:

  • Persuading and convincing
  • Ranking items by their importance, benefit, or significance
  • Illustrating a situation, problem, or solution

Most essays move from the least to the most important point, and the paragraphs are arranged in an effort to build the essay’s strength. Sometimes, however, it is necessary to begin with your most important supporting point, such as in an essay that contains a thesis that is highly debatable. When writing a persuasive essay, it is best to begin with the most important point because it immediately captivates your readers and compels them to continue reading.

For example, if you were supporting your thesis that homework is detrimental to the education of high school students, you would want to present your most convincing argument first, and then move on to the less important points for your case.

Some key transitional words you should use with this method of organization are most importantly, almost as importantly, just as importantly, and finally.

During your career, you may be required to work on a team that devises a strategy for a specific goal of your company, such as increasing profits. When planning your strategy you should organize your steps in order of importance. This demonstrates the ability to prioritize and plan. Using the order of importance technique also shows that you can create a resolution with logical steps for accomplishing a common goal.

On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph that discusses a passion of yours. Your passion could be music, a particular sport, filmmaking, and so on. Your paragraph should be built upon the reasons why you feel so strongly. Briefly discuss your reasons in the order of least to greatest importance.

SPATIAL ORDER

Spatial order is best used for the following purposes:

  • Helping readers visualize something as you want them to see it
  • Evoking a scene using the senses (sight, touch, taste, smell, and sound)
  • Writing a descriptive essay

Spatial order means that you explain or describe objects as they are arranged around you in your space, for example in a bedroom. As the writer, you create a picture for your reader, and their perspective is the viewpoint from which you describe what is around you.

The view must move in an orderly, logical progression, giving the reader clear directional signals to follow from place to place. The key to using this method is to choose a specific starting point and then guide the reader to follow your eye as it moves in an orderly trajectory from your starting point.

Pay attention to the following student’s description of her bedroom and how she guides the reader through the viewing process, foot by foot.

The paragraph incorporates two objectives you have learned in this chapter: using an implied topic sentence and applying spatial order. Often in a descriptive essay, the two work together.

The following are possible transition words to include when using spatial order:

  • Just to the left or just to the right
  • On the left or on the right
  • Across from
  • A little further down
  • To the south, to the east, and so on
  • A few yards away
  • Turning left or turning right

Key Takeaways

  • The way you organize your body paragraphs ensures you and your readers stay focused on and draw connections to, your thesis statement.
  • A strong organizational pattern allows you to articulate, analyze, and clarify your thoughts.
  • Planning the organizational structure for your essay before you begin to search for supporting evidence helps you conduct more effective and directed research.
  • Chronological order is most commonly used in expository writing. It is useful for explaining the history of your subject, for telling a story, or for explaining a process.
  • Order of importance is most appropriate in a persuasion paper as well as for essays in which you rank things, people, or events by their significance.
  • Spatial order describes things as they are arranged in space and is best for helping readers visualize something as you want them to see it; it creates a dominant impression.

Organizing Your Writing Copyright © 2016 by Writing for Success is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book

Feedback/errata.

Comments are closed.

Logo for M Libraries Publishing

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

9.3 Organizing Your Writing

Learning objectives.

  • Understand how and why organizational techniques help writers and readers stay focused.
  • Assess how and when to use chronological order to organize an essay.
  • Recognize how and when to use order of importance to organize an essay.
  • Determine how and when to use spatial order to organize an essay.

The method of organization you choose for your essay is just as important as its content. Without a clear organizational pattern, your reader could become confused and lose interest. The way you structure your essay helps your readers draw connections between the body and the thesis, and the structure also keeps you focused as you plan and write the essay. Choosing your organizational pattern before you outline ensures that each body paragraph works to support and develop your thesis.

This section covers three ways to organize body paragraphs:

  • Chronological order
  • Order of importance
  • Spatial order

When you begin to draft your essay, your ideas may seem to flow from your mind in a seemingly random manner. Your readers, who bring to the table different backgrounds, viewpoints, and ideas, need you to clearly organize these ideas in order to help process and accept them.

A solid organizational pattern gives your ideas a path that you can follow as you develop your draft. Knowing how you will organize your paragraphs allows you to better express and analyze your thoughts. Planning the structure of your essay before you choose supporting evidence helps you conduct more effective and targeted research.

Chronological Order

In Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” , you learned that chronological arrangement has the following purposes:

  • To explain the history of an event or a topic
  • To tell a story or relate an experience
  • To explain how to do or to make something
  • To explain the steps in a process

Chronological order is mostly used in expository writing , which is a form of writing that narrates, describes, informs, or explains a process. When using chronological order, arrange the events in the order that they actually happened, or will happen if you are giving instructions. This method requires you to use words such as first , second , then , after that , later , and finally . These transition words guide you and your reader through the paper as you expand your thesis.

For example, if you are writing an essay about the history of the airline industry, you would begin with its conception and detail the essential timeline events up until present day. You would follow the chain of events using words such as first , then , next , and so on.

Writing at Work

At some point in your career you may have to file a complaint with your human resources department. Using chronological order is a useful tool in describing the events that led up to your filing the grievance. You would logically lay out the events in the order that they occurred using the key transition words. The more logical your complaint, the more likely you will be well received and helped.

Choose an accomplishment you have achieved in your life. The important moment could be in sports, schooling, or extracurricular activities. On your own sheet of paper, list the steps you took to reach your goal. Try to be as specific as possible with the steps you took. Pay attention to using transition words to focus your writing.

Keep in mind that chronological order is most appropriate for the following purposes:

  • Writing essays containing heavy research
  • Writing essays with the aim of listing, explaining, or narrating
  • Writing essays that analyze literary works such as poems, plays, or books

When using chronological order, your introduction should indicate the information you will cover and in what order, and the introduction should also establish the relevance of the information. Your body paragraphs should then provide clear divisions or steps in chronology. You can divide your paragraphs by time (such as decades, wars, or other historical events) or by the same structure of the work you are examining (such as a line-by-line explication of a poem).

On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph that describes a process you are familiar with and can do well. Assume that your reader is unfamiliar with the procedure. Remember to use the chronological key words, such as first , second , then , and finally .

Order of Importance

Recall from Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” that order of importance is best used for the following purposes:

  • Persuading and convincing
  • Ranking items by their importance, benefit, or significance
  • Illustrating a situation, problem, or solution

Most essays move from the least to the most important point, and the paragraphs are arranged in an effort to build the essay’s strength. Sometimes, however, it is necessary to begin with your most important supporting point, such as in an essay that contains a thesis that is highly debatable. When writing a persuasive essay, it is best to begin with the most important point because it immediately captivates your readers and compels them to continue reading.

For example, if you were supporting your thesis that homework is detrimental to the education of high school students, you would want to present your most convincing argument first, and then move on to the less important points for your case.

Some key transitional words you should use with this method of organization are most importantly , almost as importantly , just as importantly , and finally .

During your career, you may be required to work on a team that devises a strategy for a specific goal of your company, such as increasing profits. When planning your strategy you should organize your steps in order of importance. This demonstrates the ability to prioritize and plan. Using the order of importance technique also shows that you can create a resolution with logical steps for accomplishing a common goal.

On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph that discusses a passion of yours. Your passion could be music, a particular sport, filmmaking, and so on. Your paragraph should be built upon the reasons why you feel so strongly. Briefly discuss your reasons in the order of least to greatest importance.

Spatial Order

As stated in Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” , spatial order is best used for the following purposes:

  • Helping readers visualize something as you want them to see it
  • Evoking a scene using the senses (sight, touch, taste, smell, and sound)
  • Writing a descriptive essay

Spatial order means that you explain or describe objects as they are arranged around you in your space, for example in a bedroom. As the writer, you create a picture for your reader, and their perspective is the viewpoint from which you describe what is around you.

The view must move in an orderly, logical progression, giving the reader clear directional signals to follow from place to place. The key to using this method is to choose a specific starting point and then guide the reader to follow your eye as it moves in an orderly trajectory from your starting point.

Pay attention to the following student’s description of her bedroom and how she guides the reader through the viewing process, foot by foot.

Attached to my bedroom wall is a small wooden rack dangling with red and turquoise necklaces that shimmer as you enter. Just to the right of the rack is my window, framed by billowy white curtains. The peace of such an image is a stark contrast to my desk, which sits to the right of the window, layered in textbooks, crumpled papers, coffee cups, and an overflowing ashtray. Turning my head to the right, I see a set of two bare windows that frame the trees outside the glass like a 3D painting. Below the windows is an oak chest from which blankets and scarves are protruding. Against the wall opposite the billowy curtains is an antique dresser, on top of which sits a jewelry box and a few picture frames. A tall mirror attached to the dresser takes up most of the wall, which is the color of lavender.

The paragraph incorporates two objectives you have learned in this chapter: using an implied topic sentence and applying spatial order. Often in a descriptive essay, the two work together.

The following are possible transition words to include when using spatial order:

  • Just to the left or just to the right
  • On the left or on the right
  • Across from
  • A little further down
  • To the south, to the east, and so on
  • A few yards away
  • Turning left or turning right

On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph using spatial order that describes your commute to work, school, or another location you visit often.

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your answers.

Key Takeaways

  • The way you organize your body paragraphs ensures you and your readers stay focused on and draw connections to, your thesis statement.
  • A strong organizational pattern allows you to articulate, analyze, and clarify your thoughts.
  • Planning the organizational structure for your essay before you begin to search for supporting evidence helps you conduct more effective and directed research.
  • Chronological order is most commonly used in expository writing. It is useful for explaining the history of your subject, for telling a story, or for explaining a process.
  • Order of importance is most appropriate in a persuasion paper as well as for essays in which you rank things, people, or events by their significance.
  • Spatial order describes things as they are arranged in space and is best for helping readers visualize something as you want them to see it; it creates a dominant impression.

Writing for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Create Your Free Forever Account

Write better, right now. Enter your details to create your Free AutoCrit account.

Your Email Address

By creating an account, you agree to AutoCrit's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

what is organization in creative writing

Why (And How) Should You Organize Your Writing?

To the collective AutoCrit mind, organization is important. Essential, even.

The public might imagine writers as messy creative types, perched behind desks that overflow with coffee-stained pages, tattered sticky notes, and half-empty Starbucks containers.

While there may, admittedly, be some truth in there, the fact remains that some organization is a must for a happy writer. Why? Let’s have a look.

Why organization matters

Organization matters because a cluttered environment negatively impacts the clean flow of ideas. On the most basic level, even if you’re personally happy to live among clutter, you’re probably still going to get the occasional earful from anyone you live with if you really do leave partial manuscripts abandoned on every flat surface in the house.

We all know interruptions and arguments do not make for a constructive work environment.

And that’s only the humans! If you’re blessed to live with cats, you’ll know they’re likely to push anything over without a care in the world. Cold coffee splashing right across your latest manuscript is one thing that’s sure to pull you straight out of any creative flow.

Maintaining your state of flow is what’s most important – and that simply isn’t possible when every action you need to take, and every additional piece of information you need, requires excessive effort on your behalf.

Your tools should be easily accessible, ideally from anywhere with a computer – not just your computer. We’ll explain a bit more about that shortly.

Paper vs digital

This organizational overhaul isn’t only for writers who are paper-based. Yes, it’s true most people write on computers now, but there are still many publishers, editors, and competitions that require submission of a paper manuscript. If and when those are returned to you, are you going to throw them away? Probably not.

But even if you don’t send your manuscript off to anyone, it’s still an excellent idea to edit and proof a draft at least once in paper form. You’ll see far more typos that way compared to viewing on a screen.

Additionally, organization extends to the digital world. It’s not enough to save your documents ‘somewhere’ and have no system at all in place. There are multiple reasons for this, but the most important are that, firstly, as mentioned earlier, you want resources to be accessible as easily and quickly as possible when you’re pumping out that word count for the day.

Secondly, you want to ensure that everything important is kept together for ease of security and backup. One of the worst things that can happen to a writer is unexpected file corruption or a hardware failure that means you lose everything. It happens way too often, and it’s an utterly terrifying prospect. Get your organizational system wrong (or avoid using one altogether), and that super-important document you thought was with the rest when you made your last backup might not survive the latest ‘system update gone wrong’ scenario.

Time goes by

All writers change, hopefully improving, as time goes on. It’s helpful to see and reference changes in your style as you develop, and having stories organized makes that far easier. As you develop, for example, you may begin to notice common mistakes in your first drafts that you keep having to rectify.

By consistently comparing your final versions to their first drafts, patterns might emerge. This will help you improve and change any bad habits you’ve fallen into. At the least, you’ll save yourself some time at the editing stage.

Making it as easy as possible for yourself to reflect on earlier work, note common problems, and understand your own creative process better is a massive advantage when it comes to progression as an author.

This doesn’t only apply to your manuscript itself, but also to your reference materials, planning documents, character biographies, and so much more. We’ll take a look at those next, but the case may be that the most common problem plaguing your manuscripts is actually coming from part of your planning structure. Having a strong sense of organization across multiple novels makes it far easier to pick this kind of thing out.

A place for everything and everything in its place

It isn’t a good idea to overwrite your drafts as you edit, so that early versions are lost. Some changes may come back to haunt you, and by that point, it’s too late. This can actually compound the work during editing.

Rather than making you feel like you’re chiseling a big block into a perfect sculpture, you can end up feeling like the block itself is getting bigger and bigger, and the sculpture in your mind getting ever more out of focus.

Keep your early versions and label them appropriately. When you’re ready to start editing the latest version, create a copy and use that as your working draft instead. Sure, it can feel a bit disheartening when you realize your latest file is version nine, but refinement is progress. Keep it up, and you’ll get there.

Here’s a quick overview of how you could organize your files on your computer, and in online storage like Dropbox or Google Drive (both are a superb resource you really should make use of, as they can be a savior in the event of the corruption/failure nightmare we brought up earlier).

Below the primary folder with your book’s title, key folders are subdivided into subfolders. This same method can be applied to paper copies if you work that way or need to organize print-offs, by labeling sections in a binder, or splitting each resource into its own separate physical folder.

Feel free to make any changes to the wording or style, but if you follow this outline you’ll be ready to dip and in and out of your active manuscript, store final edits, and locate required resources with little to no effort.

– Research – Journal – Story ideas

– Annotated edits – Redrafts

  • Final versions

– Profile – Personality Quiz – Pictures – Interviews

– Description – Background information – Pictures

  • Inspiration

– Pictures – Articles and advice – Writing exercises – Poems

Even if you don’t find yourself doing personality quizzes or interviews for a character, or storing articles for information, build your structure like this and the space will be ready for you. Having it there might prompt you to give these things a try in the future, and they could only be beneficial to your work.

Here are a few screenshots to indicate how this might look on a Windows PC:

Sample organized file structure for a book in progress

There are a number of excellent software packages available on the market today that can help you organize your research, character profiles, and more – but even so, maintaining your own system is well worth the effort. Especially since you can easily take your files with you using a USB pen drive, or through online storage services that are accessible from anywhere with an internet connection. Why lug your laptop around with you if the place you’re visiting already has a computer you could use to knock out some words each morning? It’s easy to do when you’re well organized!

Free Download: The Essential Story Planner For Visionary Authors

Effortlessly organize everything from your story's nations and politics, to religions, magic, technology, and even wildlife... All inside The World-Builder's Workbook. Never get caught out by the finer details or inconsistencies that drive readers crazy. Just print, plan, and publish!

what is organization in creative writing

Pro Tips For You

Blog post 8 Easy Steps to Get Your Book on the Shelf

Book Publishing – 8 Easy Steps to Publish Your Books

Blog post So You Want To Write A Romance Novel

So You Want To Write A Romance Novel

Ten Tricks To Get Your Book Back On Track

Ten Tricks To Get Your Book Back On Track

Blog post Twelve Easy Steps To Make A Novel

Twelve Easy Steps To Make A Novel

BlogPost-Getting-Good-Tension

Getting Good Tension

Self Control The Secret Ingredient For Getting Your Novel Published

Self Control: The Secret Ingredient For Getting Your Novel Published

New & Trending

Author and AutoCrit user MUMPA Lawrence Durbin

AutoCrit Author Spotlight: MUMPA Lawrence Durbin

AutoCrit Author Spotlight: Matt Sleadd

AutoCrit Author Spotlight: Matt Sleadd

What's the Score - The Terminal List by Jack Carr

Exploring The Terminal List by Jack Carr

Editing Books: After the Daft Part III

Editing Books: After the Draft (Part III)

Book Editing: After the Draft Part 1

Book Editing: After the Draft (Part II)

Editing a Book: After the Draft Part 1

Editing a Book: After the Draft (Part I)

Latest Blog Posts

How to use a Beat Sheet

Story Beats: How to Use a Beat Sheet (With Download)

Writing may not be music, but most can definitely see a creative commonality between constructing an engaging story and constructing an intriguing, enjoyable song. Rhythm,

AutoCrit What's the Score - Constance by Matthew FitzSimmons

We Crack Open Constance by Matthew FitzSimmons

Welcome back to What’s the Score?, the series in which we take novels from famous and bestselling authors, and put them to the test using the

author feature chris and sophie brousseau

AutoCrit Author Spotlight: Christopher & Sophie Brousseau

In this edition of AutoCrit Author Spotlight, we’re speaking with AutoCrit Elite members Chris & Sophie Brousseau, as we shine a light on their exciting

Write better. Right now.

Autocrit editing.

  • Member Login
  • How It Works
  • Plans & Pricing

HELP & ADVICE

  • Writer’s Desk
  • Support Center
  • AutoCrit Reviews

ABOUT AUTOCRIT

  • The AutoCrit Story
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Privacy Policy

what is organization in creative writing

Creative Writing Studies Organization

Creative Writing Studies Organization The Creative Writing Studies Organization is dedicated to helping creative writing studies establish itself through increasing the visibility of scholarship that pertains to creative writing and being an inclusive, diverse space that fosters open conversation about topics pertaining to the field.

teaching

 Mission Statement

The Creative Writing Studies Organization (CWSO) explores and interrogates the practice and theory of creative writing. Where creative writing is concerned primarily with the production of creative texts, creative writing studies also applies methods from a range of disciplines to theorize and to research the pedagogy, history, practice, practitioners, and communities within the field of creative writing. CWSO supports efforts to advance our understanding of creative writing through pedagogical and scholarly efforts across a broad range of sites and subjects. We advocate for

  • Access to knowledge, information, and resources relating to creative writing studies
  • Interdisciplinary approaches to the study and understanding of creative writing across diverse teaching and learning environments
  • The amplification of marginalized stakeholders, constituencies, and communities in order to foster open conversations
  • The critical examination of undertheorized practices in the field of creative writing

What is the Creative Writing Studies Organization?

The Creative Writing Studies Organization was founded as a non-profit in early 2016. We are dedicated to helping creative writing studies establish itself through increasing the visibility of scholarship that pertains to creative writing and being an inclusive, diverse space that fosters open conversation about topics pertaining to the field. The organization does this through two primary means: its peer-reviewed, open-access publication  The Journal of Creative Writing Studies  and an annual Creative Writing Studies Conference, the first of which was held in fall 2016.

Photo by Patrick Tomasso

How to Get Involved

The Creative Writing Studies Organization collects annual dues and formally enrolls its members. Using the menus above, you can now register as a member of the organization and receive information on the annual conference. We encourage you to read the  Journal of Creative Writing Studies  and learn more about the  Creative Writing Studies Conference . Consider submitting an article to the journal or a paper proposal to the conference. Like our  Facebook page  and follow us on  Twitter  to stay in the loop for announcements.

Visit our Membership   page to register as an individual or institutional member. As a member, you may wish to run for office, serve on a committee, or participate in elections. Our field is still young and the organization is still new. We want everyone to feel welcome and to participate in shaping the future of the organization, so please, we encourage your involvement at any level!

Kris Windley

Kris Windley

'  data-srcset=

You mad? Excited? Have a perspective to share? Please do!

22 comments.

[…] and support your topic, organize those ideas and eliminate tangents. Ideas could be arranged chronologically, logically, in order of or reverse order of importance, or randomly. Now is the time to determine the overall shape of […]

'  data-srcset=

Thank you for the knowledge mam, now I can make a presentation about organizing ideas with your blog as my references. My English is not really good but I hope you understand 🙂

'  data-srcset=

I like the Spatial order, it gives visualization to the reader. I can relate it easily. I look to read spatial orders a lot. I also used this in my writing peice.

'  data-srcset=

Thanks for your beautiful and understanding presentation mam. I read it and then I would like to say the the last 5th one method I like tha most. So I would like to say thank you again.

'  data-srcset=

Very informative, these five ways really help me because I have an idea but I don’t know how to express it. Now I’m able to put my ideas in the correct place.

'  data-srcset=

huh, I will work on these.

'  data-srcset=

I like chronological order and logical order. If I’m talking about chronological order so details in order of time, first to last.and if I’m talking about 2nd one it’s also help to reader better understanding.

'  data-srcset=

Cool blog post! really is worth my time! Kuddos sir! I also want to add something, Its about using mind maps to keep your thoughts organized. I found mind mapping ideas really helpful especially in avoiding stress due to pressure. There are free ways to make a mind map if you are wondering, Gitmind, for example. Its online, and you can use many templates for different situation. Hope you find it useful. 😀

'  data-srcset=

Thanks, Matt!

I’m not a sir, but I’ll take your kudos, regardless.

I love using mind maps too. It’s a great tactic to help you come up with, flesh out, and organize ideas in the prewriting step. Thanks!

'  data-srcset=

Thank you, Kris! Very helpful and gives me some good ideas with upcoming pieces.

I’m glad you feel helped 🙂 Can’t wait to see what you come up with, Amy! xo K

'  data-srcset=

Thank you so much for the practical tips. Now I can work on making a test question about it.

You are very welcome, Roger!

Hope your students enjoy learning about writing 🙂

Thank you so much for the practical tips. Now I can work on making a test questions about it.

'  data-srcset=

Good information and a great help – I probably write as if I am talking to someone and its not always the best method.

'  data-srcset=

Fabulous tips, Kris! I think I bounce around in styles quite a bit. If I’m writing a photo post, it’s random in writing, but a crafting tutorial is definitely chronological!

A crafter I follow recently discussed the “salt method” in conversation, which would work just as we’ll in writing… It’s similar to climatic… You give one bit of enticing info, but no resolution, get their attention (salt, no water). Give another another bit if info – more salt, still no water. Keep adding salt and then the big finish with water 🙂

Thanks again for the great tips! Love them as you help me wrap my thoughts and ideas up with pretty bows (and cute Washi tape)!!

That’s a great metaphor to describe using climactic writing, Connie! I may use that with writing students. xo K

PS – WASHIIIIIII!

'  data-srcset=

Thanks for the clarity in your post. I use chronological mostly. I sometimes use spatial, but hadn’t really thought about it as a way or organizing, so thanks for that tip.

Excellent, Valerie! Even being aware of the fact that you are using one of these frameworks makes your use of them more effective. xo K

'  data-srcset=

Chronological order is definitely my go to. 🙂

Cool! It’s a great way to do a narrative. Try switching things up with a spatial or logical order. xo K

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Want to read more check out these recent articles..

what is organization in creative writing

The Joy of Writing: Find it in these three places to use on a rainy day.

Scene: you’re at your desk, hands dancing over the keys. Click clack clickity clackity click clack – swish. Now, layer that satisfying typewriter sound with a movie soundtrack in a major key – both invigorating and also somehow relaxing. The victory song – the joy of writing. There’s steam dancing from a coffee cup that…

Writing Resistance and the great tiger hunt of Creativity and ADHD

Writing Resistance: The War of Art, or an Emotional Tiger Hunt?

Four rules to help you avoid Writing Resistance (and tiger bites) even when you’re stressed.

True Motivation does not come from guilt or shame - like...ever.

Intrinsic Writing Motivation isn’t built on guilt or shame.

Writing motivation comes in two forms. One works better than the other, but they’re both important – and neither should hurt.

what is organization in creative writing

Why you shouldn’t write King Lear right now, and what to do instead.

Oh there’s that meme again. You know the one about Shakespeare writing King Lear during the plague, or whatever. Or the other one saying that you never lacked “time” but rather you lack “discipline” unless you create or learn or complete some amazing life-goal right now. Maybe it’s a stream of pictures of *perfectly baked*…

what is organization in creative writing

“Just Start,” is the worst advice I’ve ever heard…or given.

I think those two words have hurt me more than my three worst ex-boyfriends…combined! Not because it’s bad advice to tell a person to just start the things they want to create. But because productivity for productivity’s sake – sucks. “Just Start!” is great advice if the problem you’re having is that you have a…

Check out what I'd put in a Writers' Box this Spring

If I had a Writers’ Sub Box for #30DaysWithaK today, what would I put in it?

One of the key elements of a rich Writing Practice is the act of purposefully adding a sense joy & luxury to it. That doesn’t mean that you have to scream-laugh while you draft a blog post – or purchase a solid gold desktop to hide behind. But it does mean that we can find…

  • Next »

Become a Writer Today

Top 9 Writing Organizational Patterns

If you are interested in learning about writing organizational patterns, here are some of the top patterns below that are perfect for your next writing project. 

Regardless of whether you are an avid reader or an avid writer, there are numerous patterns of organization that you may spot in writing. Different organizational patterns are helpful in different types of writing, so the proper organizational structure in one piece of writing might not be the same as the correct organizational pattern and another essay.

What are some top writing organizational patterns you may want to incorporate in your work?

1. Sequential Patterns

2. chronological patterns, 3. pros and cons, 4. spatial patterns, 5. compare and contrast patterns, 6. cause-effect patterns, 7. a topical pattern, 8. a problem and solution pattern, 9. a classification pattern.

Sequential patterns are among the most basic of all organizational writing patterns. Essentially, the author takes some information and arranges it in a process. Each section of the writing represents the main step someone has to follow. It is broken up in this way to make it easier for the reader to follow along.

For example, the writer might create an essay describing to someone how to boil water. Then, the writer will break it up into multiple steps. Some of the steps might be as follows:

  • Step 1: Get a pot that is large enough to hold water.
  • Step 2: Fill the pot with water from the sink.
  • Step 3: Place the pot on the stove.
  • Step 4: Turn the stove on by igniting it or turning on the electric burner.
  • Step 5: Wait until the water begins to bubble. 

Keep in mind that the steps might be much longer than this if the topic is more involved. This is just a basic example of how a writer might use a sequential pattern to describe to someone else how to boil water, painting a mental picture.

One of the most popular patterns you may spot in writing is chronological order. This is relatively straightforward. It is an organization of important events or ideas scattered across time. In general, chronological patterns move forward in history, but there might also be situations where they move backward. Typically, the writer will devote a chapter, a section, or a paragraph to a particular moment in time. Then, the writer will move forward, using transitions from event to event, going down the time order.

For example, the author might want to create a timeline of all the wars in which the United States has been involved. The author may start with the American Revolutionary War, which started in the 1700s. Then, the writer may move forward, covering wars in the 19th century next. This might include the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, the American Civil War, and the Spanish-American war. Finally, the writer may discuss wars of the 20th century, including World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. This is one of the most straightforward patterns to understand because the author moves forward in time with each event. 

A list of advantages-disadvantages is a typical organizational pattern that a writer will use, mainly when discussing multiple topics that fall under the same category. The idea is that it makes it easy for readers to follow along as multiple topics are being laid out under the same category. In addition, by looking at each option’s benefits and drawbacks, it is easier for readers to figure out what is right for them.

For example, the writer might be talking about different investment vehicles. Each investment vehicle has its benefits and drawbacks. As an example of how this essay might be laid out, the writer might use the following:

  • Stocks: The writer will discuss the pros and cons of investing in individual stocks, using a list of pros and cons.
  • Mutual Funds: The writer will use a list to discuss the pros and cons of investing in mutual funds.
  • Bonds: The writer will talk about the pros and cons of investing in bonds, with another list of pros and cons.

This organizational pattern makes it easy for the reader to identify the essential points from each category.

Another typical pattern that a writer might use is called a spatial pattern. A spatial pattern is an essay or catalog of different events, people, or existing buildings and specific geographic patterns. Essentially, the writer will use this pattern to paint a mental image for the reader, making it easier for them to figure out how certain areas are laid out. 

For example, if a writer uses a spatial pattern to describe Europe, they might dedicate a section of the essay to different regions. This might include Eastern Europe, which is on the edge of Russia; Central Europe, which might include areas such as Austria and Italy; and Western Europe, which could include France and Spain. The writer might also include Scandinavia, which includes Norway, Sweden, and Finland.

For example, a writer could also use a spatial pattern to divide New York City, making it easier for the reader to understand how the city has been laid out. The writer might break up the essay with a different section focusing on each borough. It might include:

  • Manhattan: A description of all of the important points of interest in Manhattan.
  • Brooklyn: A description of all the important points of interest in Brooklyn.
  • The Bronx: A description of all the important points of interest in The Bronx.
  • Harlem: A description of all the important points of interest in Harlem.
  • Staten Island: A description of all the important points of interest in Staten Island.

Within each section, the writer might talk about smaller areas, such as the West Side, the Lower East Side, Chinatown, and Little Italy. 

The next popular pattern that a writer might use is called a compare and contrast pattern. As the name suggests, the author will compare and contrast two different topics in multiple ways. For example, if the writer is crafting an essay on sports, then the writer might talk about how the New York Mets and the New York Yankees are different, even though both of them play Major League Baseball. Or, the writer might take a broader view and talk about how the major leagues are different than the minor leagues.

As one specific example, the writer might want to talk about how educational programs are different between community colleges and four-year colleges. Some of the sections of this essay might include:

  • Tuition Expenses: The writer will discuss how the cost of traditional college and community college vary.
  • Housing: The writer might also discuss how housing situations vary between traditional colleges and community colleges. 
  • Variety of Educational Programs: Next, the essay might explore how educational programs are different between traditional colleges and community colleges.
  • Job Prospects: Finally, the essay might also explore how job prospects are different for people who graduated from community college or a traditional undergraduate program.

This organizational pattern makes it easy for people to spot the differences between both programs. 

Writing Organizational Patterns: Cause-effect patterns

The writer might also elect to go with a cause-and-effect pattern. This is particularly helpful if the writer is taking a look at a historical event or if the writer is trying to push for a specific action that can be used to solve the problem. 

Essentially, the writer can decide to divide the essay into two major sections. The first talks about the causes of that issue, and the second talks about the effects of that event. As an example:

Causes of the Civil War

  • Cause 2 

Effects of the Civil War

If the writer is trying to construct a persuasive essay on the causes and effects of the Civil War, this is a very easy way to lay it out.

The other way to lay out this type of essay is to devote one section to each cause and then list the effects under that cause. An example of an essay talking about global warming might be laid out as follows:

Cause of Global Warming 1

Cause of Global Warming 2

Cause of Global Warming 3

The writer is able to see the effect relationship of the essay as it moves forward. 

A topical pattern is one of the most commonly used patterns in all writing. Essentially, this is a great organizational pattern to use if you are having difficulty finding another pattern that will work well. One topic is often broken up into multiple subtopics, making it easier for the reader to follow along.

For example, you might look at an essay about American sports. There are a lot of leagues and teams to discuss, so you might want to lay it out by topic. One suggested organizational pattern could be as follows:

  • Teams in the AFC
  • Teams in the NFC
  • Teams in the Eastern Conference
  • Teams in the Western Conference
  • Teams in the American League
  • Teams in the National League

There are multiple divisions in each conference as well. Therefore, you could break it down further if you would like. For example, if you are talking about teams in the NFC in the NFL, you could discuss the NFC North, the NFC South, the NFC East, and the NFC West in each individual section. 

You may also want to divide your essay into problem-solution patterns. This essay is relatively straightforward. It has two main sections. The first section will discuss a problem. Then, it will talk about all of the reasons why it is such a big problem. Then, in the second section, you will talk about different solutions to that problem, trying to convince the reader to take a specific action.

For example, you might want to write an essay on why diet and exercise are great solutions for overweight people might break up your essay into multiple sections, including:

Problem: Obesity

  • Obesity causes self-esteem issues.
  • Obesity causes long-term joint pain
  • Obesity increases your risk of developing heart attacks and strokes.

Solution: Diet and Exercise

  • Everyone can eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly, so it is not that expensive.
  • It is a sustainable solution that does not require taking prescription medications.
  • It has a much lower risk of leading to complications and side effects. 

Having a formal structure in place can make it easier for your reader to follow along as the effect of various conditions is explained. 

You might also be interested in classifying different items into different categories based on specific defining characteristics. If you have a broader topic that you need to cover, you may want to include specific topics in certain areas based on shared characteristics. 

One example of this type of pattern in action is hurricanes. Suppose you have been tasked to divide some of the most important hurricanes in the history of the United States into different categories. In that case, you may decide to do so by classifying them based on the Saffir-Simpson scale. This is the scale that divides hurricanes based on wind speed. The essay would be categorized as follows:

  • Category 1 Hurricanes: List of the most important category 1 hurricanes.
  • Category 2 Hurricanes: List of the most important category 2 hurricanes.
  • Category 3 Hurricanes: List of the most important category 3 hurricanes.
  • Category 4 Hurricanes: List of the most important category 4 hurricanes.
  • Category 5 Hurricanes: List of the most important category 5 hurricanes.

You may have more hurricanes in the lower categories because hurricanes that are major hurricanes tend to do more damage. 

If you are interested in learning more, check out our essay writing tips !

what is organization in creative writing

Meet Rachael, the editor at Become a Writer Today. With years of experience in the field, she is passionate about language and dedicated to producing high-quality content that engages and informs readers. When she's not editing or writing, you can find her exploring the great outdoors, finding inspiration for her next project.

View all posts

what is organization in creative writing

  • Onsite training

3,000,000+ delegates

15,000+ clients

1,000+ locations

  • KnowledgePass
  • Log a ticket

01344203999 Available 24/7

What is Creative Writing?

Discover What Is Creative Writing as we unravel the art of self-expression through words. In this blog, learn the meaning and techniques of creative writing, igniting your imagination and honing your storytelling skills. Unlock the world of literary creativity and learn how to craft compelling narratives that captivate readers.

stars

Exclusive 40% OFF

Training Outcomes Within Your Budget!

We ensure quality, budget-alignment, and timely delivery by our expert instructors.

Share this Resource

  • Report Writing Course
  • Effective Communication Skills
  • Speedwriting Masterclass
  • E-mail Etiquette Training
  • Interpersonal Skills Training Course

course

Creative Writing is a form of art that allows people to express their thoughts, ideas, and emotions through the written word. It is a mode of self-expression that combines imagination with linguistic skills to create compelling narratives, poems, and other forms of literature. A Statista survey found that 76,300 Authors, Writers and Translators work in the United Kingdom alone in 2023. This shows Creative Writing is a demanding career worldwide.To know more about it, read this blog, to learn What is Creative Writing, how to write captivating narratives, and discover the essence of expressive writing.

Table of Contents  

1) Understanding What is Creative Writing   

2) Key elements of Creative Writing   

3) Types of Creative Writing  

4)  Importance of Creative Writing

5) The Creative Writing process  

6) Tips for effective Content Writing  

7) Conclusion  

Understanding What is Creative Writing

Creative Writing is the art of crafting original content that elicits readers' emotions, thoughts, and imagination. Unlike Academic or Technical Writing, Creative Writing allows for more personal expression and imaginative exploration. It encompasses various forms such as fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and drama, all of which share the common thread of artistic storytelling.    

creative writing training

Key elements of Creative Writing  

Key Elements of Creative Writing

2) Character development: Compelling characters are the heart of any great story. Through careful development, characters become relatable, complex, and capable of driving the plot forward.    

3) Setting and atmosphere: The setting and atmosphere create the backdrop for the story. By skilfully crafting these elements, Writers can enhance the overall mood and tone, allowing readers to feel like they're living within the story's world.    

4) Plot and storytelling: A well-crafted story keeps readers engaged and invested in the narrative's progression. This includes introducing conflicts, building tension, and crafting satisfying resolutions .    

5) Dialogue and voice: Dialogue adds authenticity to characters and provides insight into their personalities. A distinctive narrative voice also contributes to the story's uniqueness and captivates readers.   

Types of Creative Writing  

Creative Writing encompasses various genres and forms, each offering a unique platform for expressing creativity, storytelling, and emotion. As you delve into the world of Creative Writing, it's essential to explore the various types and discover which resonates with you the most. Here are some of the prominent types of Creative Writing:   

Types of Creative Writing

1) Fiction  

Fiction is perhaps the most well-known type of Creative Writing. It involves inventing characters, settings, and plotlines from scratch. Writers have the freedom to create entire worlds and realities, whether they're set in the past, present, future, or even in alternate dimensions.

Novels, short stories, novellas, and flash fiction are all forms of fiction that engage readers through compelling characters, intriguing conflicts, and imaginative settings. From fantasy realms to gritty crime dramas, fiction transports readers to new and exciting places.

2) Poetry  

Poetry is the art of condensing language to evoke emotions, provoke thoughts, and communicate complex ideas using rhythm, rhyme, and vivid imagery. Poems' conciseness requires Writers to choose their words carefully, often crafting multiple layers of meaning within a few lines.

Poetry can take various forms, including sonnets, haikus, free verse, and slam poetry. Each form carries its own rules and conventions, allowing Poets to experiment with structure and sound to create impactful compositions. Moreover, poetry delves into the depth of emotions, exploring themes ranging from love and nature to social issues and personal reflections.

3) Creative non-fiction

Non-fiction writing draws from real-life experiences, observations, and research to convey information, insights, and personal perspectives. This form includes genres such as essays, memoirs, biographies, autobiographies, and journalistic pieces.

Non-fiction Writers blend storytelling with factual accuracy, presenting their ideas in a compelling and informative manner. Personal essays offer a glimpse into the writer's thoughts and experiences. At the same time, memoirs and autobiographies share personal journeys and reflections, connecting readers with the author's life story.    

4) Drama and playwriting  

Playwriting is the creation of scripts for theatrical performances. The challenge lies in crafting engaging dialogue and constructing scenes that captivate both the audience and the performers.

Dramatic Writing requires an understanding of pacing, character motivations, and the visual aspects of storytelling. While Theatrical Writing requires a keen sense of the following:    

a) Character dynamics: Building relationships between characters and exploring their motivations and conflicts. 

b)  Stage directions: Providing clear instructions for actors, directors, and stage designers to bring the play to life.

c) Dramatic structure: Crafting acts and scenes that build tension and engage the audience.  

5) Satire and humour  

Satire and humour utilise wit, sarcasm, and clever wordplay to critique and mock societal norms, institutions, and human behaviour. This form of Creative Writing often challenges readers to view the world from a different perspective.

Moreover, it encourages them to question established conventions. Satirical works, whether in literature, essays, or satirical news articles, aim to entertain while also prompting reflection on serious topics. 

Master Copywriting skills with our Copywriting Course – join today and become an expert Copywriter!  

Importance of Creative Writing  

Creative Writing holds a profound significance beyond its role as a literary pursuit. It bridges imagination and reality, fostering personal growth, communication skills, and cultural preservation. Here's a closer look at why Creative Writing is of paramount importance:   

1) Personal expression and catharsis  

Creative Writing is a sanctuary for self-expression. Individuals can voice their innermost thoughts, emotions, and experiences through poetry, stories, and essays. This act of sharing vulnerabilities and joy brings about a cathartic release, offering a therapeutic outlet for emotional expression. Moreover, it cultivates a deeper understanding of oneself, promoting self-awareness and self-acceptance.   

2) Cultivation of communication skills  

The art of Creative Writing cultivates effective Communication Skills that transcend the written word. Writers learn to convey ideas, concepts, and feelings coherently and captivatingly.

This proficiency extends to verbal communication, enabling Writers to articulate their thoughts with clarity and eloquence. As a result, it enriches interpersonal relationships and professional endeavours.   

3) Nurturing empathy and perspective  

Writers develop a heightened sense of empathy as they craft diverse characters and explore multifaceted narratives. Immersing oneself in the shoes of different characters fosters understanding and tolerance for various viewpoints and backgrounds. Readers, in turn, experience this empathy, gaining insight into the complexities of human nature and the diverse tapestry of human experience.    

4) Exploration of social issues  

Writers wield the power to effect change through their words. They can shed light on societal issues, challenge norms, and provoke critical conversations. By addressing topics such as social justice, equality, and environmental concerns, Creative Writing becomes a catalyst for positive transformation and advocacy.   

5) Connection and impact  

Creative Writing builds bridges between individuals by establishing connections on emotional and intellectual levels. Stories resonate across cultures, transcending geographical and temporal boundaries. The impact of a well-crafted story can be enduring, leaving a mark on readers' hearts and minds.

Unlock your creative potential with our Creative Writing Training - register now!  

The Creative Writing process 

The Creative Writing Process

Creating a compelling piece of Creative Writing is a journey that involves a series of steps, each contributing to the evolution of your story. Whether you're crafting a short story, a novel, or a poem, here's a breakdown of the Creative Writing process in eight essential steps:  

1) Finding inspiration  

The process begins with a moment of inspiration—a fleeting thought, an intriguing image, or a powerful emotion. Inspiration can strike anywhere—nature, experiences, dreams, or simple observation.

Keep a journal or digital note-taking app to capture these sparks of inspiration as they occur. Explore your interests, passions, and emotions to identify themes and ideas that resonate with you.  

2) Exploring ideas and brainstorming   

Once you've identified an inspiring concept, delve deeper. Brainstorm ideas related to characters, settings, conflicts, and themes. Jot down all possibilities, allowing your imagination to roam freely. This stage is about generating a wealth of creative options that will serve as building blocks for your story. 

3) Planning and outlining  

Organise your thoughts by creating an outline. Outline your story's major plot points, character arcs, and pivotal moments. This outline acts as a roadmap, guiding you through the narrative's progression while providing flexibility for creative surprises.   

4) Writing the first draft  

Once you are done with your outline, start writing your first draft. Don't worry about perfection—focus on getting your ideas onto paper. Let your creativity flow and allow your characters to surprise you. The goal is to have a complete manuscript, even if it's messy and imperfect.  

5) Revising for content  

Once the first draft is complete, take a step back before revisiting your work. During this stage, focus on revising for content. Analyse the structure of your plot, the development of your characters, and the coherence of your themes. Make necessary changes, add details, and refine dialogue. Ensure that your story's foundation is solid before moving on.  

6) Editing and polishing  

Edit your Manuscript for grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and style. Pay attention to clarity and consistency. Also, focus on enhancing the flow of your writing and creating a polished narrative that engages readers. 

7) Feedback and peer review 

Share your revised work with others—friends, writing groups, or beta readers—to gather feedback. Constructive criticism can highlight blind spots and offer perspectives you might have missed. Use this feedback to refine your work further.  

8) Finalising and proofreading  

Incorporate the feedback you've received and make final revisions. Proofread meticulously for any remaining errors. Ensure that your work is formatted correctly and adheres to any submission guidelines if you plan to publish or share it.  

Tips for effective Creative Writing  

Here are some of the useful tips you should consider incorporating in your process of writing :  

1) Show, don't tell: Instead of directly stating emotions or details, "showing" involves using actions, thoughts, and dialogue to convey information. This technique allows readers to draw their own conclusions and become more immersed in the story.  

2) Use of metaphors and similes: Metaphors and similes offer creative ways to describe complex concepts by comparing them to something familiar. These literary devices add depth and creativity to your writing.  

3) Building suspense and tension: By strategically withholding information and creating unanswered questions, Writers can build suspense and keep readers eagerly turning pages.  

4) Crafting memorable beginnings and endings: A strong opening captures readers' attention, while a satisfying conclusion leaves a lasting impact. These elements bookend your story and influence readers' overall impression.  

5) Experimenting with point of view: The choice of point of view (first person, third person, etc.) shapes how readers experience the story. Experimenting with different perspectives can lead to unique narrative opportunities.  

Conclusion   

We hope this blog gave you a clear idea of What is Creative Writing, along with its process and useful tips. The Creative Writing process is not linear; you might find yourself revisiting earlier steps as your story evolves. Embrace the journey, allowing your writing to develop and transform through each phase. 

Enhance your Academic Writing prowess with our comprehensive Academic Writing Masterclass . - sign up now!

Frequently Asked Questions

a) Literary Agent

b) Screenwriter

c) Video Game Story Writer

d) Copywriter

e) Website Editor

f) Creative Director

There are several resources or recommended readings which can help you to hone your Creative Writing skills. Here we have discussed some of such resources:

a) “On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft" by Stephen King

b) "Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life" by Anne Lamott

c) "Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within" by Natalie Goldberg

d) Joining book clubs

e) Reading a variety of authors and genre

f) Practicing writing regular prompts and exercises.

The Knowledge Academy takes global learning to new heights, offering over 30,000 online courses across 490+ locations in 220 countries. This expansive reach ensures accessibility and convenience for learners worldwide.   Alongside our diverse Online Course Catalogue, encompassing 17 major categories, we go the extra mile by providing a plethora of free educational Online Resources like News updates, Blogs , videos, webinars, and interview questions. Tailoring learning experiences further, professionals can maximise value with customisable Course Bundles of TKA .

The Knowledge Academy’s Knowledge Pass , a prepaid voucher, adds another layer of flexibility, allowing course bookings over a 12-month period. Join us on a journey where education knows no bounds.

The Knowledge Academy offers various Personal Development courses , including Organisational skills training, Emotional Intelligence Training, and Report Writing Course. These courses cater to different skill levels, providing comprehensive insights into Journalism .    Our Business Skills blogs covers a range of topics related to Sports Journalism, offering valuable resources, best practices, and industry insights. Whether you are a beginner or looking to advance your Creative Writing skills, The Knowledge Academy's diverse courses and informative blogs have you covered.

Upcoming Business Skills Resources Batches & Dates

Fri 12th Apr 2024

Fri 14th Jun 2024

Fri 30th Aug 2024

Fri 11th Oct 2024

Fri 13th Dec 2024

Get A Quote

WHO WILL BE FUNDING THE COURSE?

My employer

By submitting your details you agree to be contacted in order to respond to your enquiry

  • Business Analysis
  • Lean Six Sigma Certification

Share this course

New year big sale, biggest christmas sale .

red-star

We cannot process your enquiry without contacting you, please tick to confirm your consent to us for contacting you about your enquiry.

By submitting your details you agree to be contacted in order to respond to your enquiry.

We may not have the course you’re looking for. If you enquire or give us a call on 01344203999 and speak to our training experts, we may still be able to help with your training requirements.

Or select from our popular topics

  • ITIL® Certification
  • Scrum Certification
  • Change Management Certification
  • Business Analysis Certification
  • Microsoft Azure
  • Microsoft Excel & Certification Course
  • Microsoft Project
  • Explore more courses

Press esc to close

Fill out your  contact details  below and our training experts will be in touch.

Fill out your   contact details   below

Thank you for your enquiry!

One of our training experts will be in touch shortly to go over your training requirements.

Back to Course Information

Fill out your contact details below so we can get in touch with you regarding your training requirements.

* WHO WILL BE FUNDING THE COURSE?

Preferred Contact Method

No preference

Back to course information

Fill out your  training details  below

Fill out your training details below so we have a better idea of what your training requirements are.

HOW MANY DELEGATES NEED TRAINING?

HOW DO YOU WANT THE COURSE DELIVERED?

Online Instructor-led

Online Self-paced

WHEN WOULD YOU LIKE TO TAKE THIS COURSE?

Next 2 - 4 months

WHAT IS YOUR REASON FOR ENQUIRING?

Looking for some information

Looking for a discount

I want to book but have questions

One of our training experts will be in touch shortly to go overy your training requirements.

Your privacy & cookies!

Like many websites we use cookies. We care about your data and experience, so to give you the best possible experience using our site, we store a very limited amount of your data. Continuing to use this site or clicking “Accept & close” means that you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more about our privacy policy and cookie policy cookie policy .

We use cookies that are essential for our site to work. Please visit our cookie policy for more information. To accept all cookies click 'Accept & close'.

Need help submitting your writing to literary journals or book publishers/literary agents?  Click here! →

what is organization in creative writing

Review Board is now open! Submit your Short Prose, Poetry, and Book today!

Deadline: thursday, february 22nd, writers associations: local and national organizations for writers.

Here’s a great list of writers associations, writers groups , and organizations for writers! Many local writers organizations have affiliations with national groups, but some writing groups stand alone within their communities. If you want to find national writing associations, look no further! If you’re interested to find local writing groups, check out this great list we’ve compiled of writing groups by state.

Writing organizations offer wonderful resources for writers. Some writers associations or organizations are free; others charge membership fees. These fantastic writers associations can help you find a literary agent, arrange meetings with editors, go to writing conferences, learn craft techniques, and keep up with changes in the publishing industry.

Before you join a writers association or organization, be sure to ask a lot of questions to make sure that the group is appropriate for you!

Submit to Review Board

Enjoy our list of local and national organizations for writers!

TIP: Be sure to check out our FREE list of Writing Groups by State or Region !

We know there are more writers associations out there, but we hope this list will get you started.

Writers Associations: Organizations For Writers Of Fiction (Novels, Stories, Books)

American Christian Fiction Writers — A writers association for writers of Christian novels and stories.

Historical Novel Society — A great association of writers of historical fiction. Offers community, networking opportunities (agents, editors, publishers, booksellers), and more.

Novelists, Inc. — A professional writers organization for multi-published book authors.

Mystery Writers Of America — An organization for writers of mystery novels, as well as editors, screenwriters, and other professionals associated with the mystery genre.

Romance Writers Of America — The trade organization for writers of romantic fiction.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America — SFWA offers many resources for writers of speculative genres. A very vibrant and active writers association.

Sisters In Crime — A writers organization dedicated to the professional advancement of women who write in the crime and mystery genres.

Western Writers Of America — A writers association for authors whose work focuses on the American West.

Welcome To The NEA: Or, How To Get Money For Writing Stuff  — One of the most consistently magnanimous supporters of the arts in America is the National Endowment for the Arts, which has numerous—and generous—grants available in all areas of the arts, including literature. Learn more about the NEA.

Women’s Fiction Writers Association  — An inclusive organization of writers creating layered stories in which the plot is driven by the main character’s emotional journey.

Nonfiction Writers Associations And Organizations

American Society Of Journalists And Authors (ASJA) — For independent nonfiction writers and freelancers.

Asian American Journalists Association — A writers organization for new and veteran journalists who are Asian Pacific Americans.

National Association Of Memoir Writers — For writers of all levels who are writing memoir, personal essays, and nonfiction.

Native American Journalists Association — A writing organization for Native American journalism. Offers many opportunities for professional advancement.

Nonfiction Authors Association — Their primary focus is helping their members with educational resources and community support for marketing nonfiction books.

Poetry: Organizations For Poets

Poetry Society Of America — An association of writers who love poetry in all forms. Welcomes published and unpublished poets.

Academy Of American Poets — Regularly sponsors national poetry events and poetry publications in order to advocate poetry. Membership dues for this writing association help pay for programs.

Writers Associations: General And Specific Interests

Association of Writers And Writing Programs — For writers and teachers affiliated with college and university writing programs.

Authors Guild — A professional organization for writers, great for keeping up with the changing face of the publishing industry and issues related to copyright protection.

The Catholic Writers Guild — For writers of all kinds who share the Catholic faith.

Cat Writers Association — A community for writers who specialize in cats.

Dog Writers Association of America —A community for writers who specialize in dogs.

Erotica Readers And Writers — An association of writers and readers of erotic writing.

Islamic Writers Alliance — Members include “published and aspiring writers, editors, artists, publishers, journalists, playwrights, Web designers, retailers, and marketing consultants.”

The National Writers Union — A freelance writers union for authors in all genres: This group is a trade organization that advocates for the rights of authors.

International Association For Journal Writing  — A writers association that focuses on journaling and creative expression.

International Women’s Writing Guild — An association of women writers developed for networking and offering mutual support.

Military Writers Society Of America — An organization for writers, poets, and artists who focus on military service. Encourages memoir writing, writing as therapy, and education about publishing.

National Association Of Independent Writers And Editors  — From the website: This writers association includes “novelists, copywriters and copyeditors, writing coaches, proofreaders, magazine writers, writing teachers, business writers and editors, academic writing evaluators, writers of literature for children, fiction editors and other specialists.”

National Writers Association — A writers association for all levels and genres that offers some professional services, such as contract review and critique.

Pacific Northwest Writers Association — A Northwest writers association “to develop the writing talent through education, accessibility to the publishing industry, and participation in an interactive, vital writer community.”

PEN America Center — An organization with global reach that defends the right to expression through the written word.

Small Publishers, Artists, And Writers Network — (SPAWN) An inclusive writers group for independent-minded writers, publishers, printers, and members of the media.

Society of Children’s Book Writers And Illustrators — An association for writers of books for children.

Texas Association Of Authors — The only organization in Texas whose focus is to promote the authors within the great state of Texas itself. Texas Authors leverages the knowledge and expertise of many different authors to help promote others within the world of reading and writing.

Women’s National Book Association — A national organization of women and men who work with and value books.

Writers Guild Of America — Two writers organizations (east and west) that represent writers in motion pictures, broadcasting, and other media.

More! Find A Local Writing Group, Association, Or Organization

Want to find a local writing group? A writers association that meets close to home? Finding the right group may be easier than you think! If you want to find more writers associations, here’s where to start:

Your local library. Librarians know a lot about local writers organizations and groups. Your neighbors may be writing and you don’t even know it. Stop by your local library’s circ desk and ask about local writing groups or clubs.

Your local bookstore. Many independent bookstores host groups of creative writers, who gather for critique, feedback, and support. Support your local bookseller and connect with like-minded writers!

Our researchers have created this list of the best Facebook groups for writers . Pick one (or a few!) to join!

Meetup.com. This website (or another like it) can help you connect with writers who share your interests. As always, take precautions when joining any new group!

If you’re going to join a writing organization, it’s important to know how to critique other writers in an honest, productive, and encouraging way. Here are 11 tips for critiquing other writers !

Nowadays you can easily connect with other writers through online writing groups . We’ve curated a list of virtual writing communities you can check out online!

Want to start a writing group yourself? Check out these tips!

You can learn more about the benefits of having a writing community here !

Are you attending a writing conference this year? Check out our Ultimate Writing Conference Survival Guide !

Closing Notes

what is organization in creative writing

For more great free resources, subscribe to Writer’s Relief’s weekly e-publication, Submit Write Now!

Please take a moment to like, share, email, tweet, or stumble this page! And if you’d like to repost any of our articles, you can! Just contact us for details.

OUR QUESTION TO YOU : What writers associations and organizations did we miss? Email us to let us know!

what is organization in creative writing

See ALL the services we offer, from FREE to Full Service!

Click here for a Writer’s Relief Full Service Overview

what is organization in creative writing

Services Catalog

what is organization in creative writing

Free Publishing Leads and Tips!

  • Name * First Name
  • Email * Enter Email Confirm Email
  • Phone This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

what is organization in creative writing

Featured Articles

what is organization in creative writing

Featured Video

what is organization in creative writing

  • Facebook 121k Followers
  • Twitter 113.9k Followers
  • YouTube 5k Followers
  • Instagram 5.5k Followers
  • LinkedIn 145.5k Followers
  • Pinterest 33.5k Followers
  • Name * First
  • E-mail * Enter Email Confirm Email
  • Comments This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

WHY? Because our insider know-how has helped writers get over 18,000 acceptances.

  • BEST (and proven) submission tips
  • Hot publishing leads
  • Calls to submit
  • Contest alerts
  • Notification of industry changes
  • And much more!

close-link

  • Name This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Pin It on Pinterest

what is organization in creative writing

Creative Primer

What is Creative Writing? A Key Piece of the Writer’s Toolbox

Brooks Manley

As we delve into the world of writing, it becomes apparent that not all writing is the same. One form that stands out due to its unique approach and focus on imagination is creative writing. This section will explore the question, “ what is creative writing ” and highlight its key characteristics.

Definition of Creative Writing

Creative writing is a form of writing that extends beyond the bounds of regular professional, journalistic, academic, or technical forms of literature. It is characterized by its emphasis on narrative craft, character development, and the use of literary tropes or poetic techniques to express ideas in an original and imaginative way.

Creative writing can take on various forms such as poetry, novels, short stories, plays, screenplays, and more. It’s a way for writers to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in a creative, often symbolic, way. It’s about using the power of words to transport readers into a world created by the writer.

Key Characteristics of Creative Writing

Creative writing is marked by several defining characteristics, each working to create a distinct form of expression:

1. Imagination and Creativity: Creative writing is all about harnessing one’s creativity and imagination to create an engaging and compelling piece of work. It allows writers to explore different scenarios, characters, and worlds that may not exist in reality.

2. Emotional Engagement: Creative writing often evokes strong emotions in the reader. It aims to make the reader feel something — whether it’s happiness, sorrow, excitement, or fear.

3. Originality: Creative writing values originality. It’s about presenting familiar things in new ways or exploring ideas that are less conventional.

4. Use of Literary Devices: Creative writing frequently employs literary devices such as metaphors, similes, personification, and others to enrich the text and convey meanings in a more subtle, layered manner.

5. Focus on Aesthetics: The beauty of language and the way words flow together is important in creative writing. The aim is to create a piece that’s not just interesting to read, but also beautiful to hear when read aloud.

Remember, creative writing is not just about producing a work of art. It’s also a means of self-expression and a way to share one’s perspective with the world. Whether you’re considering it as a hobby or contemplating a career in it, understanding the nature and characteristics of creative writing can help you hone your skills and create more engaging pieces. For more insights into creative writing, check out our articles on creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree and is a degree in creative writing worth it .

Styles of Creative Writing

To fully understand creative writing , one must be aware of the various styles involved. Creative writing explores a multitude of genres, each with its own unique characteristics and techniques. The styles we’ll explore in this section are poetry , short stories , novels , screenplays , and plays .

Poetry is a form of creative writing that uses expressive language to evoke emotions and ideas. Poets often employ rhythm, rhyme, and other poetic devices to create pieces that are deeply personal and impactful. Poems can vary greatly in length, style, and subject matter, making this a versatile and dynamic form of creative writing.

Short Stories

Short stories are another common style of creative writing. These are brief narratives that typically revolve around a single event or idea. Despite their length, short stories can provide a powerful punch, using precise language and tight narrative structures to convey a complete story in a limited space.

Novels represent a longer form of narrative creative writing. They usually involve complex plots, multiple characters, and various themes. Writing a novel requires a significant investment of time and effort; however, the result can be a rich and immersive reading experience.

Screenplays

Screenplays are written works intended for the screen, be it television, film, or online platforms. They require a specific format, incorporating dialogue and visual descriptions to guide the production process. Screenwriters must also consider the practical aspects of filmmaking, making this an intricate and specialized form of creative writing. For those interested in this style, understanding creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree can provide useful insights.

Writing for the theater is another specialized form of creative writing. Plays, like screenplays, combine dialogue and action, but they also require an understanding of the unique dynamics of the theatrical stage. Playwrights must think about the live audience and the physical space of the theater when crafting their works.

Each of these styles offers unique opportunities for creativity and expression. Whether you’re drawn to the concise power of poetry, the detailed storytelling of novels, or the visual language of screenplays and plays, there’s a form of creative writing that will suit your artistic voice. The key is to explore, experiment, and find the style that resonates with you. For those looking to spark their creativity, our article on creative writing prompts offers a wealth of ideas to get you started.

Importance of Creative Writing

Understanding what is creative writing involves recognizing its value and significance. Engaging in creative writing can provide numerous benefits, including developing creativity and imagination , enhancing communication skills , and exploring emotions and ideas .

Developing Creativity and Imagination

Creative writing serves as a fertile ground for nurturing creativity and imagination. It encourages individuals to think outside the box, explore different perspectives, and create unique and original content. This can lead to improved problem-solving skills and a broader worldview, both of which can be beneficial in various aspects of life.

Through creative writing, one can build entire worlds, create characters, and weave complex narratives, all of which are products of a creative mind and vivid imagination. This can be especially beneficial for those seeking creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree .

Enhancing Communication Skills

Creative writing can also play a crucial role in honing communication skills. It demands clarity, precision, and a strong command of language. This helps to improve vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, making it easier to express thoughts and ideas effectively.

Moreover, creative writing encourages empathy as writers often need to portray a variety of characters from different backgrounds and perspectives. This can lead to a better understanding of people and improved interpersonal communication skills.

Exploring Emotions and Ideas

One of the most profound aspects of creative writing is its ability to provide a safe space for exploring emotions and ideas. It serves as an outlet for thoughts and feelings, allowing writers to express themselves in ways that might not be possible in everyday conversation.

Writing can be therapeutic, helping individuals process complex emotions, navigate difficult life events, and gain insight into their own experiences and perceptions. It can also be a means of self-discovery, helping writers to understand themselves and the world around them better.

In conclusion, the importance of creative writing extends beyond the realm of literature and academia. It fosters creativity, enhances communication skills, and provides a platform for self-expression and exploration. Whether you’re a seasoned writer or just starting out, the benefits of creative writing are vast and varied. For those interested in developing their creative writing skills, check out our articles on creative writing prompts and how to teach creative writing . If you’re considering a career in this field, you might find our article on is a degree in creative writing worth it helpful.

Steps to Start Creative Writing

Creative writing can seem daunting to beginners, but with the right approach, anyone can start their journey into this creative field. Here are some steps to help you start with creative writing .

Finding Inspiration

The first step in creative writing is finding inspiration . Inspiration can come from anywhere and anything. Observe the world around you, listen to conversations, explore different cultures, and delve into various topics of interest.

Reading widely can also be a significant source of inspiration. Read different types of books, articles, and blogs. Discover what resonates with you and sparks your imagination.

For structured creative prompts, visit our list of creative writing prompts to get your creative juices flowing.

Planning Your Piece

Once you have an idea, the next step is to plan your piece . Start by outlining the main points, characters, settings, and plot. This can serve as a roadmap to guide your writing process.

Remember, a plan doesn’t have to be rigid. It’s a flexible guideline that can be adjusted as you delve deeper into your writing. The primary purpose is to provide direction and prevent writer’s block.

Writing Your First Draft

After planning your piece, you can start writing your first draft . This is where you give life to your ideas and breathe life into your characters.

Don’t worry about making it perfect in the first go. The first draft is about getting your ideas down on paper. You can always refine and polish your work later.

And if you don’t have a great place to write that first draft, consider a journal for writing .

Editing and Revising Your Work

The final step in the creative writing process is editing and revising your work . This is where you fine-tune your piece, correct grammatical errors, and improve sentence structure and flow.

Editing is also an opportunity to enhance your storytelling. You can add more descriptive details, develop your characters further, and make sure your plot is engaging and coherent.

Remember, writing is a craft that improves with practice. Don’t be discouraged if your first few pieces don’t meet your expectations. Keep writing, keep learning, and most importantly, enjoy the creative process.

For more insights on creative writing, check out our articles on how to teach creative writing or creative writing activities for kids.

Tips to Improve Creative Writing Skills

Understanding what is creative writing is the first step. But how can one improve their creative writing skills? Here are some tips that can help.

Reading Widely

Reading is a vital part of becoming a better writer. By immersing oneself in a variety of genres, styles, and authors, one can gain a richer understanding of language and storytelling techniques. Different authors have unique voices and methods of telling stories, which can serve as inspiration for your own work. So, read widely and frequently!

Practicing Regularly

Like any skill, creative writing improves with practice. Consistently writing — whether it be daily, weekly, or monthly — helps develop your writing style and voice. Using creative writing prompts can be a fun way to stimulate your imagination and get the words flowing.

Attending Writing Workshops and Courses

Formal education such as workshops and courses can offer structured learning and expert guidance. These can provide invaluable insights into the world of creative writing, from understanding plot development to character creation. If you’re wondering is a degree in creative writing worth it, these classes can also give you a taste of what studying creative writing at a higher level might look like.

Joining Writing Groups and Communities

Being part of a writing community can provide motivation, constructive feedback, and a sense of camaraderie. These groups often hold regular meetings where members share their work and give each other feedback. Plus, it’s a great way to connect with others who share your passion for writing.

Seeking Feedback on Your Work

Feedback is a crucial part of improving as a writer. It offers a fresh perspective on your work, highlighting areas of strength and opportunities for improvement. Whether it’s from a writing group, a mentor, or even friends and family, constructive criticism can help refine your writing.

Remember, becoming a proficient writer takes time and patience. So, don’t be discouraged by initial challenges. Keep writing, keep learning, and most importantly, keep enjoying the process. Who knows, your passion for creative writing might even lead to creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree . Happy writing!

Brooks Manley

Brooks Manley

what is organization in creative writing

Creative Primer  is a resource on all things journaling, creativity, and productivity. We’ll help you produce better ideas, get more done, and live a more effective life.

My name is Brooks. I do a ton of journaling, like to think I’m a creative (jury’s out), and spend a lot of time thinking about productivity. I hope these resources and product recommendations serve you well. Reach out if you ever want to chat or let me know about a journal I need to check out!

Here’s my favorite journal for 2024: 

the five minute journal

Gratitude Journal Prompts Mindfulness Journal Prompts Journal Prompts for Anxiety Reflective Journal Prompts Healing Journal Prompts Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Journal Prompts Mental Health Journal Prompts ASMR Journal Prompts Manifestation Journal Prompts Self-Care Journal Prompts Morning Journal Prompts Evening Journal Prompts Self-Improvement Journal Prompts Creative Writing Journal Prompts Dream Journal Prompts Relationship Journal Prompts "What If" Journal Prompts New Year Journal Prompts Shadow Work Journal Prompts Journal Prompts for Overcoming Fear Journal Prompts for Dealing with Loss Journal Prompts for Discerning and Decision Making Travel Journal Prompts Fun Journal Prompts

Inspiring Ink: Expert Tips on How to Teach Creative Writing

You may also like, a guide to gratitude and mindfulness journaling + 50 prompts.

Brooks Manley

Famous Diaries: The 10 Most Famous Published Diaries

Planner review: legend planner pro, leave a reply cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Productivity
  • Favorite Journals
  • Sign Up for Mailing List
  • Search Search

Username or Email Address

Remember Me

MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing

Resources for Writers: The Writing Process

Writing is a process that involves at least four distinct steps: prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. It is known as a recursive process. While you are revising, you might have to return to the prewriting step to develop and expand your ideas.

  • Prewriting is anything you do before you write a draft of your document. It includes thinking, taking notes, talking to others, brainstorming, outlining, and gathering information (e.g., interviewing people, researching in the library, assessing data).
  • Although prewriting is the first activity you engage in, generating ideas is an activity that occurs throughout the writing process.
  • Drafting occurs when you put your ideas into sentences and paragraphs. Here you concentrate upon explaining and supporting your ideas fully. Here you also begin to connect your ideas. Regardless of how much thinking and planning you do, the process of putting your ideas in words changes them; often the very words you select evoke additional ideas or implications.
  • Don’t pay attention to such things as spelling at this stage.
  • This draft tends to be writer-centered: it is you telling yourself what you know and think about the topic.
  • Revision is the key to effective documents. Here you think more deeply about your readers’ needs and expectations. The document becomes reader-centered. How much support will each idea need to convince your readers? Which terms should be defined for these particular readers? Is your organization effective? Do readers need to know X before they can understand Y?
  • At this stage you also refine your prose, making each sentence as concise and accurate as possible. Make connections between ideas explicit and clear.
  • Check for such things as grammar, mechanics, and spelling. The last thing you should do before printing your document is to spell check it.
  • Don’t edit your writing until the other steps in the writing process are complete.

what is organization in creative writing

11 Great Organization Tools for Writers

Home » Blog » 11 Great Organization Tools for Writers

what is organization in creative writing

11 GREAT ORGANIZATION TOOLS FOR WRITERS

Being a writer requires a combination of talent and discipline. Successful writers must develop routines and habits that allow them to harness their creative powers. In addition, writers must make time to conduct research, take notes, edit, and proofread their work.

Indeed, the entire writing process demands a great deal of organization and careful attention to detail.

Luckily, there are a lot of fantastic tools available to help writers stay organized and on task.

In this article, we will explore eleven great organization tools for writers to implement into their daily routines.   

1. Scrivener

Scrivener aims to be the ultimate organizational tool.

what is organization in creative writing

This tool for writers looks to incorporate everything a writer needs to produce great content. It focuses on helping writers organize notes, prepare outlines, reference research, and produce manuscripts.

Additionally, Scrivener helps writers stay organized by bringing every kind of file together in a single application.

In general, Scrivener serves any type of writer, from novelists to comic book designers. In particular, non-fiction writers can greatly benefit as it allows research notes, PDF files, audio notes, and transcribed interviews to mesh together in a single point.

Writers can highlight text to include notes, references, and websites. It is a complete tool for writers to stay organized.

The biggest drawback is the steep learning curve that comes with this application. It takes time to learn how the entire program functions. Fortunately, the $45 license for Windows and $49 for Mac come with tutorials.

On the whole, Scrivener is a great tool to help build organization skills for writers.

2. Google Docs

Google Docs is a ubiquitous tool known for its flexibility and reliable online presence. After all, a stable internet connection is enough to get access to Google Docs.

In particular, Google Docs is a great tool for writers due to its collaborative nature. As such, teams working on a single file can track changes and make edits in real-time.

Google Docs’ best feature is that it is free.

Also, it works on any device. As a result, it is a perfect choice for anyone looking for a simple, easy-to-use word processor with basic functionality.

Moreover, it is a great tool for organization as it allows writers to offer suggestions before accepting changes.

what is organization in creative writing

On the downside, Google Docs has limited capabilities. Particularly, its performance slows down as documents get bigger or multiple images get inserted.

Furthermore, many standard functions available in other word processors are not accessible on Google Docs.

Nevertheless, it is a great option for any user looking for a simple and cost-effective way of collecting ideas and producing relatively simple documents.

Freedom is a productivity-boosting app. Specifically, Freedom keeps distractions at bay by temporarily restricting user access to certain apps and websites. For instance, instant messages from social media apps and non-essential emails get tucked away for later reference.

This great tool for writers helps cut down on unproductive and wasted time, helping writers concentrate on producing great content.

Freedom works across multiple devices and starts at $6.99 a month. Also, there is a $129 lifetime fee. This tool for writers is worth its cost, especially when distractions are too hard to ignore.

4. ProWritingAid

There are plenty of spelling and grammar checking tools out there. However, most tools fail to deliver an in-depth analysis of writing style and language use.

what is organization in creative writing

ProWritingAid provides a detailed analysis of writing based on grammar, spelling, and style.

Moreover, this app gives suggestions on emotion, unusual language, reading grades, plagiarism, and variety. In particular, ProWritingAid offers suggestions on the fly. As such, it helps writers and editors improve writing as they go along.

The biggest advantage that ProWritingAid offers is easy integration with various platforms such as Microsoft Word, iOS, Google Chrome, and Scrivener, among others.

This app offers a free trial option, which is worth using to gauge its effectiveness. Paid plans start at $79 a year. This price is on par with other similar options in the market.

Overall, it is a tool for writers looking to organize the most common mistakes they make to avoid them moving forward.

5. Novel Factory

Novel Factory is a sophisticated organizational tool for writers.

Novel Factory mainly focuses on fiction writing, helping writers to build plots, develop characters, and organize notes. However, non-fiction writers can also benefit from Novel Factory’s great organization scheme.

In addition, this app’s great character organization tool can become highly useful when managing topics and subtopics.

Novel Factory’s scene management feature organizes individual scenes, or topics, highlighting key information. Additionally, the app’s plot manager uses an index card system, which can also be helpful for non-fiction writers. Novel Factory links images, weblinks, and other media to specific scenes, text, or notes.

Ultimately, Novel Factory is a highly useful organizational tool for fiction and non-fiction writers alike. Its word process and split-screen view greatly enhance visibility when working with various sources and materials.

6. Evernote

Evernote is the ultimate note-taking app on the market. As such, it is a wonderful organizational tool for writers. It allows writers to organize notes seamlessly. Evernote is a collaborative organization tool that allows multiple users to share notes, files, screenshots, weblinks, audio, and video.

what is organization in creative writing

Additionally, Evernote has a solid search feature. In other words, users can go through multiple notes quickly and easily.

On the whole, Evernote is a great alternative to OneNote. It gives writers the flexibility to organize their entire data set into “notebooks.”

Consequently, this arrangement makes it quite easy for fiction and non-fiction writers alike.

The basic Evernote account is free. The Premium version starts at $7.99 a month. It is certainly worth starting with the free version and then deciding if the paid version’s additional features are worth the cost.

The Ulysses app is a word processor specific to Mac users. As such, it is a great organization for writers using Mac computers. On the whole, Ulysses provides a clean interface that promotes distraction-free writing. Additionally, this app allows writers to save all work related to a single project in one spot, allowing for easy access later on.

Ulysses’ most useful feature is its ability to publish directly on WordPress and Medium. This feature makes Ulysses a strong app for bloggers, journalists, marketers, or anyone who publishes frequently. Please note that this app does offer support in character or plot development. As a result, Ulysses caters more to non-fiction writers. Nevertheless, fiction writers can also make good use of its robust features.

Lastly, Ulysses helps writers organize their progress by offering a goal-setting and tracking function. This app is a highly useful tool as it helps writers stay on track.

This great app for writers certainly helps manage progress effectively. Ulysses syncs documents with multiple devices. Thus, it is good for writers constantly on the go.

The app is free to use with a subscription fee starting at $4.99 a month.

When it comes to designing and formatting books, Vellum is a go-to organization app for writers.

Vellum allows writers, editors, and publishers to format books prior to publication.

As such, this facilitates organization for writers by reducing the amount of work needed to produce quality, professional-looking books.

Currently, Vellum is available for Mac users only. The app facilitates importing files in various formats. Also, editing files is easy within the app. However, it is worth noting that Vellum is not a word processor. Additionally, users can preview books before exporting the finished file in the format of their choice.

The app is free to use. However, it requires a subscription before exporting finished files for publication. The first subscription has a $199 fee. It allows unlimited e-book exports. The $249.99 fee allows unlimited e-book and paperback exports.

Overall, Vellum is great a saving time during the final editing process. It is a great organizational tool for writers who publish frequently.

9. Focus Writer

Focus writer is a “bare-bones” word processing tool for writers. Its aim is to remove distractions so writers can focus solely on producing great content.

On the whole, it has a clean design. Toolbars disappear in full-screen mode. As such, this great organization app for writers aims to reduce visual strain. Additionally, Focus Writer helps track writing goals based on time and word count. Therefore, Focus Writer promotes organization for writers by helping them plan their work.

Nevertheless, please note that Focus Writer lacks many of the advanced features that Microsoft Word offers. Therefore, it is a great organization and writing tool for writers who do not need much more than text-based content. Best of all, Focus Writer is free to use. It is worth giving it a try, particularly when distractions are a consideration.

10. Fast Pencil

Fast Pencil is a fantastic organizational app for writers. It allows writers to self-publish their work seamlessly. It facilitates organization for writers by enabling formatting, e-book publishing, and print publishing (including ISBN and retail barcode).

Fast Pencil aids worldwide publishing and distribution.

This great app also eases the management of sales and royalties.

It is a complete publishing management tool for writers. Therefore, it saves time and effort when planning the publishing portion of a book.

what is organization in creative writing

Please bear in mind that this app does not work offline. Moreover, it is not a word processor. As such, Fast Pencil manages finished manuscripts ready for publication. The app is free to use with additional packages that unlock its full features.

11. Bibisco

Bibisco is an all-in-one organization tool for creative writers.

This wonderful organization tool for writers incorporates a word processor, organizer, timeline creator, plot development tool, chapter tracker, and character creation function.

Bibisco’s best feature is its outlining function. It facilitates generating outlines that lead to simple character and plot development. Moreover, its features help creative writers navigate multiple characters, places, items, and events throughout the story’s development.

On the downside, Bibisco is an open-source tool. Therefore, it consistently gets updates. Writers need to save their work frequently in order to prevent information loss during a sudden update. The app is technically free but requests a “pay what you want” donation. The “donation” is roughly $15.

Organization Is Everything

Seasoned writers know that organization is the backbone of any successful book project. Therefore, writing organization tools greatly facilitate the most difficult part of the writing process: outlining ideas and organizing thoughts.

Nevertheless, please bear in mind that a rough draft needs to go through proofreading and editing.

While nothing can substitute trained human eyes, spellcheckers and editing tools can greatly cut down overall editing.

Additionally, publishing tools that enable easy formatting and publication aid in cutting down on overall production time.

This approach helps writers better organize their time and efforts. After all, any tools that can help reduce time and effort are more than welcome.

Lastly, choosing the right tools begins with testing them out. From there, writers can decide which organization tools work best for their particular styles and rhythm.  

Related Content

what is organization in creative writing

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe to Newsletter

  • Scheduling Your Content Campaign
  • Old Tricks, New Clicks: An Overview to Repurposing Your Content
  • Your Keyword Compass: The Complete Guide to Finding Target Keywords
  • The Future of Content Marketing
  • Owned, Paid, and Earned Content: What’s the difference?
  • Copywriting & PR
  • Editing & Proofreading
  • Writer's Resources
  • Training & HR Material
  • Ghostwriting & Books
  • Social Content
  • Web Content
  • Corporate & Stakeholder Communications
  • Technical Writing
  • Medical Copy
  • O&G Copy
  • Thought Leadership Content
  • RFPs & Proposals
  • Speeches & Presentations
  • Watercooler

Book cover

The Handbook of Creativity & Innovation in Business pp 319–335 Cite as

The Creative Organization

  • Philip Dennett 2  
  • First Online: 05 August 2022

1642 Accesses

Encouraging creativity in organizations requires the development of a creative culture that encourages and supports employees to pursue new ideas in pursuit of clearly defined goals.

This culture is an ecosystem consisting of three interconnecting cogs: the management culture of the organization, the environment in which employees operate, and individual creativity.

  • Organizational creativity
  • Creative cultures
  • Creative ecosystems
  • 4E’s Socratic model

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution .

Buying options

  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
  • Durable hardcover edition

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Godfrey PC, Merrill CB, Hansen JM. The relationship between corporate social responsibility and shareholder value: an empirical test of the risk management hypothesis. Strateg Manag J. 2009;30:425–45.

Article   Google Scholar  

Kappel M. How to establish a culture of employee engagement. Forbes. 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikekappel/2018/01/04/how-to-establish-a-culture-of-employee-engagement/?sh=796f46f28dc4 .

Chamorro-Premuzic T, Akhtar R. Motivating your most creative employees. Harv Bus Rev. 2018. https://hbr.org/2018/11/motivating-your-most-creative-employees .

Podolny JM, Hansen MT. How Apple is organised for innovation. Harv Bus Rev. 2020. https://hbr.org/2020/11/how-apple-is-organized-for-innovation .

Woodman RW, Sawyer JE, Griffin RW. Toward a theory of organisational creativity. J Acad Manag. 1993;18(2):293–321.

Google Scholar  

Kanter RM. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on the frontiers of management. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press; 1997.

Amabile T, Gryskiewicz S. Creativity in the R and D laboratory, Technical report no. 30. Greensboro: Center for Creative Leadership; 1987. https://doi.org/10.35613/ccl.1897.1088

Book   Google Scholar  

Çokpekin Ö, Knudsen M. Does organizing for creativity really lead to innovation? Creat Innov Manag. 2012;21(3):304–14.

Robinson S, Stubberud HA. A comparison of methods of creativity in small and large European businesses. Int J Entrep. 2015;19:140–51.

Dennett P. The 4E’s Socratic model—a framework to foster creativity in teams. In: Reisman F, editor. Creativity in arts, science and technology: research papers on knowledge, innovation and enterprise, vol. IV ed. London: KIE Conference Publications; 2016. p. 46.

Florida R. The rise of the creative class: and how its transforming work, leisure, community and everyday life. Melbourne: Pluto Press; 2002.

Sawyer K. Explaining creativity: the science of human innovation. New York: Oxford University Press; 2006.

Te Matarau a Maui. Innovative infrastructure and information. 2020. http://www.tematarau.co.nz/strategy/innovative-infrastructure-and-information/ .

Binnewies C, Ohly S, Sonnentag S. Taking personal initiative and communicating about ideas: what is important for the creative process and for idea creativity? Eur J Work and Organ Psy. 2007;16(4):432–55.

Hirst G, Vanknippenberg D, Chen C, Sacramento C. How does bureaucracy impact individual creativity? a cross level investigation of team contextual influences on goal orientation-creativity relationships. Acad Manag J. 2011;54(3):624–41.

Csikszentmihalyi M. Happiness and creativity: going with the flow. Futurist. 1997;31(5):8–12.

Bissola R, Imperatori B, Colonel R. Enhancing the creative performance of new product teams: an organizational configurational approach. J Prod Innov Manag. 2014;31(2):375–91.

Brown S, Grant A. From GROW to GROUP: theoretical issues and a practical model for group coaching in organisations. Coach Int J Theory Res Pract. 2010;3(1):30–45.

Gajendran R, Joshi A. Innovation in globally distributed teams: the role of LMX, communication frequency, and member influence on team decisions. J Appl Psychol. 2012;97(6):1252–61.

Kahrobaei S, Mortazavi S. How leader–member exchange can uplift team’s energy to increase creative work involvement. Team Perform Manag. 2016;22(1/2):75–91.

Guilford JP. Creativity. Am Psychol. 1950;5(9):444–54.

Amabile T. A model of creativity and innovation in organisations. Res Organ Behav. 1988;10:123–67.

Dennett P. 4E’s Socratic model: facilitators guide. Sydney: Mulga Partners; 2015.

Download references

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Philip Dennett

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Philip Dennett .

Editor information

Editors and affiliations.

Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand

Rouxelle de Villiers

CREATiViTY LABORatory

1.1 activity i: team creativity exercise.

Form a team of 4–6 members. Using the process described in Sect. 15.6 above address an issue that is important to your organization or university group. Appoint a facilitator who will lead the group and on completion of the task reflect on the process.

1.2 Activity II: Interaction Checklist

Often creative ideas come out of random interactions. As a senior manager, make a list of ways you could encourage random interactions amongst your team.

1.3 Activity III: Creative Cultures

Consider an organization you have worked with. Review the questions in Sect. 15.2 and then create a description that describes its culture. How would you change this to build a more creative culture?

1.4 Activity IV: Case Analysis

Would the Apple management philosophy – changing from general management to expert management work in a typical hierarchical organization. Why? Why not?

1.5 Activity V: Facilitating a State of Flow

Consider a team you have worked with. To what degree have you experienced a state of flow? What components of Csikszentmihalyi’s were present or missing?

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Cite this chapter.

Dennett, P. (2022). The Creative Organization. In: de Villiers, R. (eds) The Handbook of Creativity & Innovation in Business. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-2180-3_15

Download citation

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-2180-3_15

Published : 05 August 2022

Publisher Name : Springer, Singapore

Print ISBN : 978-981-19-2179-7

Online ISBN : 978-981-19-2180-3

eBook Packages : Business and Management Business and Management (R0)

Share this chapter

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Publish with us

Policies and ethics

  • Find a journal
  • Track your research

IMAGES

  1. Types of organizational patterns in writing. Basic vs Applied Research

    what is organization in creative writing

  2. Creative Writing 11+ : 11+ Creative Writing

    what is organization in creative writing

  3. 21 Top Examples of Creative Writing

    what is organization in creative writing

  4. creative writing lesson plan

    what is organization in creative writing

  5. FREE Organization Writing Poster~ This writing poster, along with

    what is organization in creative writing

  6. How To Improve Creative Writing : Improving Writing Skills Can Be Fun

    what is organization in creative writing

COMMENTS

  1. Why Organization Is So Important in Writing

    Why is organization important in writing? When you're preparing longform text, your goal is to make that text as easy for your reader to absorb as possible.

  2. Organizing information for writing: 7 helpful methods to try

    In any piece of writing, organization is a crucial factor that determines its effectiveness. Without a clear organizational pattern, your audience could become confused and lose interest. You can organize your writing by using your critical thinking skills to view your writing from your reader's perspective.

  3. Organization and Structure

    While organization varies across and within disciplines, usually based on the genre, publication venue, and other rhetorical considerations of the writing, a great deal of academic writing can be described by the acronym IMRAD (or IMRaD): Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion.

  4. Organization Definition

    a group of people who are working collaboratively to achieve a purpose; a business; an organization.

  5. What is Organization?

    What is Organization? Key Outcomes By the end of this chapter, you will be able to Explain conventional approaches to order and organize writing. Identify features of ordered writing. Identify strategies for organizing writing. Understand the process of writing as a means for developing an organization. Getting Started with Organization

  6. Organize

    Methods of Organizing Writing. The three common methods of organizing writing are chronological order , spatial order, and order of importance. You need to keep these methods of organization in mind as you plan how to arrange the information you have gathered in an outline. An outline is a written plan that serves as a skeleton for the ...

  7. Organizing Your Writing

    Exercise 3. On a separate sheet of paper, write a paragraph that discusses a passion of yours. Your passion could be music, a particular sport, filmmaking, and so on. Your paragraph should be built upon the reasons why you feel so strongly. Briefly discuss your reasons in the order of least to greatest importance.

  8. 9.3 Organizing Your Writing

    Exercise 1. Choose an accomplishment you have achieved in your life. The important moment could be in sports, schooling, or extracurricular activities. On your own sheet of paper, list the steps you took to reach your goal. Try to be as specific as possible with the steps you took.

  9. Why (And How) Should You Organize Your Writing?

    To the collective AutoCrit mind, organization is important. Essential, even. The public might imagine writers as messy creative types, perched behind desks that overflow with coffee-stained pages, tattered sticky notes, and half-empty Starbucks containers.

  10. Seven Ways to Organize Your Writing Life (And Become More Creative)

    Then, spend no more than five minutes clearing a writing space where you have enough room to work. During the rest of the week, set aside time to write and to get organized. You might want to schedule your writing for 30 minutes, then spend 5-10 minutes taking a simple next step to get more organized. Being organized will help support your writing.

  11. Home

    Creative Writing Studies Organization The Creative Writing Studies Organization is dedicated to helping creative writing studies establish itself through increasing the visibility of scholarship that pertains to creative writing and being an inclusive, diverse space that fosters open conversation about topics pertaining to the field.

  12. The 15 Best Writing Organization Tools of the Year

    Writer's Companion 3. Todoist 4. Trello 5. Scrivener 6. Scapple 7. yWriter 8. Aeon Timeline 9. Plottr 10. Plot Factory 11. Novel Factory 12. The Author Success Planner

  13. 5 Ways for Writers to Organize Ideas

    1. Chronological Order. What it is: This is a very common way to organize ideas as a writer or storyteller that basically involves dishing out ideas or details in order of time, first to last. When to use it: It is often used in expository writing (narrative that informs or explains) - particularly when describing an event or series of events.

  14. Creative Writing 101: Everything You Need to Get Started

    Creative writing is writing meant to evoke emotion in a reader by communicating a theme. In storytelling (including literature, movies, graphic novels, creative nonfiction, and many video games), the theme is the central meaning the work communicates. Take the movie (and the novel upon which it's based) Jaws, for instance.

  15. Top 9 Writing Organizational Patterns

    Some of the steps might be as follows: Step 1: Get a pot that is large enough to hold water. Step 2: Fill the pot with water from the sink. Step 3: Place the pot on the stove. Step 4: Turn the stove on by igniting it or turning on the electric burner. Step 5: Wait until the water begins to bubble.

  16. What Is Creative Writing: A Complete Guide

    Creative Writing is a form of art that allows people to express their thoughts, ideas, and emotions through the written word. It is a mode of self-expression that combines imagination with linguistic skills to create compelling narratives, poems, and other forms of literature.

  17. What Is Creative Writing? Types, Techniques, and Tips

    Simply put, creative writing is any writing that falls outside of technical, journalistic, or academic writing. You can think of it as classic storytelling. It can be written with a number of intentions: to entertain us, comfort us, or teach us a lesson; most importantly, good creative writing speaks to our shared human experience.

  18. Writers Associations: A List Of Organizations For Writers

    — A professional writers organization for multi-published book authors. Mystery Writers Of America — An organization for writers of mystery novels, as well as editors, screenwriters, and other professionals associated with the mystery genre. Romance Writers Of America — The trade organization for writers of romantic fiction.

  19. What is Creative Writing? A Key Piece of the Writer's Toolbox

    Brooks Manley Creative Primer is a resource on all things journaling, creativity, and productivity. We'll help you produce better ideas, get more done, and live a more effective life. My name is Brooks. I do a ton of journaling, like to think I'm a creative (jury's out), and spend a lot of time thinking about productivity.

  20. Resources for Writers: The Writing Process

    Resources for Writers: The Writing Process. Writing is a process that involves at least four distinct steps: prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. It is known as a recursive process. While you are revising, you might have to return to the prewriting step to develop and expand your ideas.

  21. 11 Great Organization Tools for Writers

    1. Scrivener Scrivener aims to be the ultimate organizational tool. This tool for writers looks to incorporate everything a writer needs to produce great content. It focuses on helping writers organize notes, prepare outlines, reference research, and produce manuscripts.

  22. Creative writing

    Creative writing is any writing that goes outside the bounds of normal professional, journalistic, academic, or technical forms of literature, typically identified by an emphasis on narrative craft, character development, and the use of literary tropes or with various traditions of poetry and poetics.

  23. The Creative Organization

    Abstract. Encouraging creativity in organizations requires the development of a creative culture that encourages and supports employees to pursue new ideas in pursuit of clearly defined goals. This culture is an ecosystem consisting of three interconnecting cogs: the management culture of the organization, the environment in which employees ...

  24. KAMALAYAN on Instagram: " Last call for aspiring student-journalists

    25 likes, 0 comments - mcl_kamalayan on February 11, 2024: " Last call for aspiring student-journalists! Join us for the FINAL recruitment drive of Acade..."

  25. DIY Marketing + AI: How to use free AI tools to supercharge your

    IN THIS WORKSHOP, YOU WILL LEARN ABOUT: Introduction to marketing processes Introduction to AI with tips on writing and refining the right 'prompts' Hands-on exercise - create a campaign for YOUR business: Use AI to help develop a custom marketing plan Use AI to help create all of the required text and image assets PRESENTER: Peter Gosling, CEO ...