How to write a supporting statement for a job application

The Job Studio - Birmingham Careers Advice and Coaching

Writing a supporting statement involves:

  • Figuring out exactly what the employer is looking for
  • Coming up with a structure
  • Finding evidence that shows you've got what it takes
  • Writing the main body of the statement
  • Writing introductory and concluding paragraphs
  • Proofreading before you submit!

Read on to find out more about how to put these steps into practice and write an interview-winning supporting statement!

When it comes to finding the right candidate, not all employers favour the traditional CV and cover letter - some prefer to read a supporting statement (often also called a personal statement). The good news is that this doesn't require any fancy formatting, but the fact you can’t rely on looks means you have to nail the content. In this post I’ll talk you through how to write a supporting statement for a job application so you stand out from the competition.

Note: as mentioned above, as many people use the terms ‘supporting statement’ and ‘personal statement’ interchangeably in this post I have used both of these terms.

What is a supporting statement?

A supporting statement is used to outline your suitability for a particular role and is your chance to speak directly to the employer’s wants and needs. Although any employer can request one, supporting statements are particularly common in the education and non-profit/charity sectors. One of the biggest employers in the UK, the NHS, requests applicants complete a supporting information section on their online application - this is exactly the same as a supporting/personal statement.

Want to see an interview-winning supporting statement for a job application? I've included one in my Printable Supporting Statement Bundle.

Supporting statement vs. cover letter

While a cover letter is used to convey your interest in a particular job and your suitability for it, a supporting statement is more in-depth and should evidence all of the required competencies for the role. You can find out more about the differences between a supporting statement and a cover letter in my recent article .

Step 1: Identify what the employer wants

Most employers will ask you to evidence your suitability for the role in the supporting statement, but others may want you to explain your motivation for applying too. Be clear on what the employer wants before writing your statement so you can be sure you're hitting the brief.

You also need to know what competencies the employer is looking for from their ideal candidate. This information is usually found in the job description (it's often labelled 'Person Specification), but it may appear in the job advert itself. Look for phrases like ‘We are looking for someone with…’ or ‘Our ideal candidate will have….’; whatever follows this is what you need to focus on evidencing.

If the employer has set a word limit for the supporting statement, make sure you stick to it. If they haven’t, read my blog post How long should a supporting statement be? to find out how much to write.

Step 2: Decide on a structure

It’s entirely up to you how to structure your supporting statement, but there’s a structure I find works really well that I recommend to clients during my Supporting Statement Review Service - structure it around the competencies listed in the person specification. If the employer lists around five to eight competencies, this would be perfectly manageable to structure your supporting statement around, but any more and I'd recommend grouping them. To do this, group competencies that relate to one-another or are similar. For example, you could group IT skills, administration and organisation skills or interpersonal, customer-service and listening skills.

Another point to consider is the order of your statement, and which competencies will be addressed first. It's a good idea to tackle them in terms of their overall importance for the role. Generally speaking, if you've got relevant experience for the position you're applying for, you should highlight this early on as it's a big selling factor. If you’re unsure about the best order to address each competency, review the person specification to see if they are grouped into ‘Essential’ and ‘Desirable’. You may find clues in how frequently the employer has referred to the competencies in the job description too.

If you’ve got limited experience, you may find structuring your supporting statement around each competency a bit tricky. If this is the case, structure it around your past roles or experiences. For example, one paragraph for your current job and the second for your last job. You can then use other paragraphs to focus your attention more on certain aspects of these roles.

Take the stress of out writing your statement

supporting statement bundle to help you learn how to write a supporting statement

Step 3: Select your evidence

Now you need to identify the all-important evidence. Evidence can be a few different things: specific situations or projects you’ve worked on, or roles you’ve held which required the competencies needed for the role. For example, you may refer to a specific project to evidence your organisation skills, but the same project could also be used to evidence your time-management and multi-tasking skills too. The key is to draw on a range of evidence in your personal statement (don't just rely on one role to evidence everything if you can help it), and focus attention on the most relevant and/or recent examples.

Detailed evidence is what your application will depend on so make sure you dedicate a good amount of time to this. I encourage my clients to brainstorm examples they could refer back to in their personal statement in order to evidence each competency. My Printable Supporting Statement Bundle includes a competency matching grid to help you identify what the employer wants, and match your experience to it.

If you're looking for more tailored support with your application, check out my Supporting Statement Review Service .

Step 4: Start writing

Once you’ve decided on your structure and decided what evidence you're going to draw on, it’s time to start writing. To avoid your personal statement becoming too descriptive, dedicate a paragraph to each competency or group of competencies. This will help your writing stay focused, clear and persuasive.

Want to see what an excellent supporting statement looks like? I've included an interview-winning statement in my printable Supporting Statement Bundle .

Step 5: Write your opening and closing paragraphs

People often struggle with knowing how to start a supporting statement, and it puts them off writing entirely. This is why I recommend leaving the opening until last. By the time you’ve written a first draft you’ll know the key points you want to cover and this will help when you come to writing your opening. When it comes to deciding how to end a supporting statement, keep your message short and sweet. Avoid repeating yourself, and instead provide a summary of your suitability and interest in the role.

Most people struggle to write the opening and closing paragraphs of their supporting statement, so below I’ve included the simple steps to follow to make sure you’re covering the key points and making a good first and last impression.

How long should your opening and closing paragraphs be?

Before you get started, you may be wondering how much to write for these paragraphs.  I’d suggest no more than a paragraph which is at most 4-5 lines in length. Be mindful of your overall word count when planning your opening and concluding paragraph – each one should be no more than 5% of the overall word count. So if you have a limit of 1000 words, stick as close to 50 words for each paragraph as you can.

How to start a supporting statement

Here’s a three-step process for how to start your supporting statement:

1. Introduce yourself

One of the most common ways people start a supporting statement is by explaining why they are writing (i.e. to state the role they are applying for and outline who they are). This usually means mentioning their current role and employer and a brief background about their work history. This doesn't have to be too lengthy – remember you have the rest of the supporting statement to detail your skills, experience and competencies. Including a brief overview at the start of your statement can set it off nicely. This may looking something like:

I am writing to apply for the role of... I currently work as a... and have over two years' experience in...

2. Highlight your key selling points

The next topic to cover at the start of your supporting statement is your selling points. These are the skills, knowledge, experience and/or competencies that make you a suitable candidate for the role. Just like when you  write a profile on a CV , you'll need to use your judgment to decide what's worth highlighting at the start of your supporting statement and what can be left until later on. If there is one, use the person specification as a guide. You may want to highlight the competencies you consider to be the most essential for the role.

As you will see I have worked primarily in ... roles which has allowed me to develop excellent skills in X, Y and Z. My current position of ... has strengthened my expertise in .... and developed my knowledge in .....

Simplify your job search

3. express your interest in the role.

After outlining your key selling points at the start of your personal statement, you need to explain why you're applying for the role. Unless the company explicitly asks you to write about this, you should stick to a short paragraph for this section.

Here you need to express your interest in the role or organisation you're applying for. Identify a specific reason (or if you can  reasons ) why the role appeals to you. I’d suggest picking three reasons why you applied. It's a good idea to go beyond the job advert and description - employers often want to feel like you have chosen them above other companies. This requires research so make sure you read  How to research an industry in 5 easy steps for tips on how to do this well. Here's an example:

I was instantly drawn to the advertised role due to its focus on... I have also been looking for a role which would offer more exposure to ... which is a further reason for my interest.

How to start a supporting statement: what to avoid

First impressions count so make sure the opening to your supporting statement doesn't include:

  • A quote  – quotes often come across as gimmicky, so unless you're confident it perfectly fits the point you want to make don't include them.
  • Long-winded stories  – hiring managers don't have long to review applications so make their life easy and avoid long narratives.
  • Spelling or grammar mistakes  – you'd be amazed how many people make these at the start of their supporting statement so make sure you double and triple-check your whole document.
  • Flowery language  – you don't need to use fancy language to impress. Yes, you want to show the employer you can write well but you can do this without shoe-horning words into your statement that don't really fit.
  • What you don't have  – never draw attention to the fact that you don't have what you think the employer is looking for. Why emphasise this when you could just say ' I have experience in... ' or ' My varied experience has strengthened my X and Z skills...'

How to end a supporting statement

When you've already spent hours writing your supporting statement, it can be tempting to overlook the importance of the closing paragraph. Lots of people rush this part because they want to get it finished and submitted, but a poor ending can leave the hiring manager with questions about your suitability for the role. Here are three points to cover at the end of your supporting statement:

1. Re-emphasise your suitability for the role

This doesn't need to be a long-winded account of how you match what the hiring manager is looking for. Instead, you just need to include a simple sentence stating that you have the blend of competencies the employer is looking for. It's as simple as that – and what’s even better is you can re-use this sentence from one supporting statement to the next, adapting it slightly to fit the particular role or organisation you’re applying for.

The main purpose of a supporting statement is to show your suitability for a role, so when it comes to the ending, you want to re-emphasise this. With limited words, you need to write a concise summary of your key selling points and package them nicely into a sentence or two.

What these selling points are is up to you to decide. If you’ve already written your supporting statement, you should know what these are but to help with this, put yourself in the hiring manager's shoes and consider what they’re looking for and which boxes you tick as a candidate. These selling points are probably more focused on relevant experience/knowledge than individual skills, although if the role requires a specific skill and this is something you excel at, of course you can focus in on this.

You could use these selling points to emphasise a few different things - the fact you can hit the ground running in the role, make an impact or be an asset to the team. All of these are good phrases but the more tailored you can make these sentences the better. For example, you could mention the organisation’s name or even better - the specific project and/or department you'd be working in. Making it as tailored as possible is the key here.

3. Reiterate your interest in the role

When planning how to end a supporting statement, most job seekers overlook this key point. Ideally, you should have outlined what attracted you to the role at the start of your supporting statement however now is the time to reiterate that interest. Why is this important? Because whilst hiring managers are primarily interested in finding people with the necessary skills, experience and knowledge for the position, they also want to find people who are enthusiastic and excited by the prospect of working in that specific role and for that particular company.

When covering this point, your key consideration should be the language you use. This is how you are going to convey your interest and enthusiasm for the role and company. You want to avoid flowery language and be direct about what interests and/or excites you about the prospect of working in that role and for that employer. Here are a few example words/phrases:

  • I am particularly excited by...
  • I would welcome the opportunity to...
  • I look forward to the prospect of…

Example of how to end a supporting statement

You don’t need to overthink this – you should keep your ending simple and use it to reiterate your suitability for the role:

In summary, I feel the above demonstrates that my professional skills, knowledge, and personal attributes make me a strong candidate for the role of …. at …... My blend of administrative experience, … and …. means I have the knowledge, skills and passion for a role that is the logical next step in my career.

Here's another example:

I am thrilled at the possibility of being involved in .... and would love the opportunity to meet with you and discuss the value I can bring to your .... project. I look forward to hearing from you.

What to avoid at the end of a supporting statement

The last thing you want to do in your closing paragraph is to raise any suspicions about your suitability for the role or cast doubt on how serious you are about this application. There are various ways this can come across, but here are a few common mistakes I see:

  • Highlighting your lack of experience  - candidates do it all the time, and although they may think they’re being ‘honest’ there is no need to raise this.
  • Using weak or passive language  - phrases like 'I think my skills...' which will only make you come across as lacking in confidence. Instead, change this to 'My skills...'
  • Waffling  – you want to keep your ending concise, and to the point.

Optional extras

If you would like, you can add any of the following to the concluding paragraph of your supporting statement:

  • Your availability for a potential interview  – if you’re going to be unavailable when the interviews are taking place you may want to highlight this by simply adding to the end of your statement: “I am on holiday between the dates of [add date range] and will be unable to attend an interview during this time.” If you are going to be unavailable for a face-to-face interview, but would be happy to be interviewed remotely, you can also state this.
  • A disability  – you have no legal requirements to disclose a disability to an employer, however you may wish to mention this in your application. For example “Please note, I …..”

So there you have it - everything you need to know about how to write a supporting statement for a job application. If you want to be sure the supporting statement you're writing is showcasing your relevant skills and experience, take a look at my Supporting Statement Review Service .

This post was originally published on December 1 2019, but was updated in March 2023 with additional content.

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How to Write a Supporting Statement with Examples

supporting statement tips

Learning how to write a supporting statement is important. Supporting statements have over recent years become an important part of the application process. This is partly because sending a CV/resume when applying for a job has become easier than ever before. Employers are flooded with applications! On the flip side this has made it harder for  the hiring managers to decide whether a person’s is simply spamming their CV and if interest is genuine or not. A personal statement is a great way of filtering that challenge. In this blog post you’re going to learn how to write a supporting statement with examples.

What is a supporting statement

A supporting statement can be considered as a shorter and more concise version of your cover letter.  It should be no longer than two paragraphs long and take up approximately a quarter of an A4 sheet of paper,  so up to between 80 to 150 words. 

Why are supporting statements important?

Supporting statements have a starring role in the modern job application process. The role of the supporting statement is to provide added value to your CV or resume.  If your CV or resume is the cake, then the supporting statement will be the icing. It’s an enhancer there to help your CV shine and provide colour to the content. You could even say it is the job application equivalent of MSG,  it’s there to bring out the flavour in your CV.  Although unlike MSG It has no effect on your health! 

Companies also value the fact that you have gone the extra mile when writing a supporting statement for a job. By not simply sending your CV, but also demonstrating that you have an authentic interest in that particular position.  This will make it easier for you in your job application  to ultimately get through to the interview stage. At the interview stage it’s important to learn the STAR interview technique as well as know which killer interview questions work best. To be able to master this skill I would recommend that you consider interview coaching , as it will allow you to shine in your interviews.

In the rest of this post we’re going to cover the various key aspects when it comes to writing a supporting statement.  Furthermore to also discuss example supporting statements. 

How to start a supporting statement

When starting to write your supporting statement  The key is to build context quickly you’re trying to paint a picture as fast as possible in the hiring manager’s mind.  When learning how to write the start of a supporting statement, it’s essential that you mentioned the following:

  •  Your Job Title or Specialisation as a professional.
  • The number of years experience you have. 
  • The type of industries or organisations that you’ve worked for or with.

The reason why listing your job title or specialisation is very important is that when it comes to writing a supporting statement for a job, this helps instantly build context.  The reader will be able to understand your current role and can visualise what you might be doing in your job.  Now if it’s the case that your job title doesn’t align very well for the vacancy that you are applying for, maybe you are trying to move into a more senior position. Then  it’s better to mention your specialisation, saying something along the lines of marketing professional rather than marketing coordinator   since your job title of marketing coordinator is lower than that of a marketing manager which is the role that you’re targeting.

Mentioning the number of years that you have experienced again goes back to the fundamental principles on how to  write a job supporting statement, which is to create context quickly. By mentioning the number of years they automatically know how experienced you are. Usually experience correlates with the seniority of the role that you’re applying for for example if you’ve got two years of experience it’s very unlikely that you will be going for a manager role. However it is generally acceptable that if you have around 4 years experience that a manager position is something you’d be suitable to apply for. So  from my experience there’s very little negative when it comes to measuring the number of years. 

Also by talking about the organisations and industries that you’ve worked in, goes back to that to the importance of painting a picture very quickly when writing a supporting or summarising statement.  Particularly if you have worked with or for well-known recognisable brands. This aspect of starting your statement  is critical. 

How to write a supporting statement

To write a personal statement  there are a number of  important principles  to follow. Below are the list of three key steps you will be able to write a supporting statement for a job whatever your level of experience.

  • Be descriptive by using figures and numbers
  • Talk about the  quantifiable skills that you possess
  • Mention something specific that impressed you about the organisation or the role

1) Be descriptive by using figures and numbers

To write a supporting statement first you need to understand that a  supporting statement  has to be concise and numbers are critical in creating context and understanding quickly. By saying the number of years of experience that you have,  the amount of people that you’ve led, the size of the budgets that you manage, and how much money you’ve generated or saved  within your company. Will instantly have a positive impact!

2) Talk about the quantifiable skills that you possess

Remember that you’re trying to build a picture as quickly as possible about you in the shower for the shortest amount of time. Soft skills are very difficult to express in writing because they are subjective and require greater explanation.  Talking about  your quantifiable skills can instantly allow the hiring manager to see your level of competence in ability to do the job for example if you have experience of  a particular type of programming language such as Java or have experience of using software’s such as SAS.   Or that you know a particular type of analysis technique when conducting research that is easy for others to appreciate and understand.

3) Mention something specific that impressed you about the organisation or the role

A key aspect of the supporting statement  compared to a Resume or CV is that you’re showcasing and demonstrating specific interest in that role or the organisation therefore it’s vital that you do that.  One of the ways that you can do this is to Showcase in the research that you’ve done  on the organisation  by mentioning alignment of their values with yours, where specifically their vision and goals, finally alignment with what you will bring to the table. 

supporting statement example

How long should a supporting statement be?

The recommended length of a supporting statement should be between 100 to 150 words and a maximum of two to three paragraphs long. This is an important rule to stick to because you do not want your supporting statement becoming too long and turning into a cover letter because then it defeats the whole purpose and function of what the supporting or summarising statement is supposed to do. Especially statements when applying to competitive companies such as Google, Amazon , AWS, the NHS and Civil service . If you’re interested in writing a personal statement with example definitely visit our blog section to read more. 

Tips for writing your supporting statement

There’s important factors that you need to consider when writing a supporting statement. We’ve already discussed the key components in terms of structuring your supporting statement; however now I will give you some strategies to make it easy for you to write a supporting statement.

  • Less is more! Think about how you can write something as concisely as possible, think Twitter rather than a Facebook post.
  • Use positive emotive language to speak about yourself.
  • If you’re not sure about  exact facts and figures, have used approximately or between e.g. approximately £10m, between 20-30 staff members.

Supporting statement templates

So now we’re going to look at some supporting statement examples as well as templates.  This includes statements to support job application examples. 

[Current job title] possessing over [years of experience], working for the likes of [companies you’ve worked for or with]. Expertise include [list technical expertise]. Garnering a track record of success [ list achievements].

I’m excited by this opportunity at [organisation name] firstly because I believe your mission of [organisation mission] and values [ list values] align with my own. Secondly because I believe that my experiences are an excellent match for [list job title] and I would love to have the opportunity to demonstrate my credentials further in an interview.

So above is a simple yet effective template statement to support job application example. By using it you will be able to write job statements when applying without much stress or bother.

Supporting Statement Examples

Now we’re going to look at some supporting statement example UK, USA, UAE, Singapore and Australia. Also to write a statement examples for anywhere else in the world.

Example 1: Supporting Statement For Digital marketing expert

“My name is [Name]. An experienced digital marketing expert with over 5 years of experience working for the likes of  Barclays, JP Morgan, Vans and Adidas. Expertise include developing bespoke social media campaigns across Facebook YouTube Instagram Snapchat and Tiktok.  generating revenues in excess of 2 million dollars. 

I’m interested in this opportunity because your vision on how to make creative content for big brand, as well as your values of innovation respect any quality align with my own.  I believe that with my experience, knowledge and expertise I can contribute to your organisation and would love the opportunity to be invited for an interview.”

Example 2: Supporting Statement For business analyst

“My name is [Name]. MBA-qualified Business Analyst with over 7 years professional experience within the Healthcare, Automotive and Aerospace sector.  This includes working for Jaguar Land Rover, Airbus and NHS England. Expertise include business process mapping,  multiple stakeholder management,  and Excel.  Successfully helped deliver over 5 key business Improvement projects valued between £5m-£10m.

I’m excited by the possibility of working with  your organisation, your values of  honesty, integrity and fun, as well as your desire  to create green solutions for the transportation sector. This  is something that aligns with my own personal values and mission.  I would love to have the opportunity to be able to discuss my credentials in an interview.”

Sample of Supporting Statement for Job Application (with Examples!)

Crafting a Stellar Supporting Statement:

This article provides a sample supporting statement in British English, explores key elements to include, and offers dos and don’ts to guide your writing.

Sample Supporting Statement:

Here’s an example to get you started (remember to tailor it to the specific job you’re applying for):

“I’m a highly experienced [current job title or expertise] with over [list years of experience] of experience working for reputable companies such as [list companies you’ve worked for]. My expertise includes [list areas of specific expertise]. I have a demonstrably successful track record, for instance, [list accomplishments, provide figures where possible].

I’m particularly interested in this opportunity because [list your specific reason regarding what’s impressed you about the company]. I believe that with my experience, knowledge and expertise I can make a significant contribution to your organisation’s goals. I’m confident my skills align well with the job description [link relevant skills]. I’m keen to learn more and discuss how I can be an asset to your team. Please don’t hesitate to contact me to schedule an interview.”

What to Include in a Supporting Statement

Here are five key areas to consider when writing your supporting statement. Aim to integrate all five if possible, but a minimum of three is crucial.

1) Alignment with the Job Description:

Matching your experiences to the job description is paramount. This demonstrates your qualifications and how you meet the required criteria. You can highlight this alignment at the beginning or end of your statement (see the provided Sample Supporting Statement for examples).

2) Include Your Skills and Experience:

This is arguably the most critical part. Showcase your skills and experiences in a direct manner, demonstrating your ability to excel in the role. List your years of experience, specific quantifiable skills, and the companies you’ve worked for (especially prestigious or well-known ones).

3) Your Education and Training:

For professionals with extensive experience, education and training might be less important. However, if you’re a recent graduate or have less experience (under two years), emphasizing your education and training is crucial. It helps bridge the gap and convinces the reader that despite your experience level, you possess valuable skills acquired through your studies and training.

4) Mention Your Past Achievements:

Quantify your skills, experiences, education, and training by mentioning past achievements. Avoid longwinded paragraphs. Integrate facts and figures to provide context quickly and keep your statement concise.

5) Your Goals for the Future:

Expressing your future goals is important, but ensure they align with the company’s vision, mission, and values. A strong alignment demonstrates you’d be a perfect match.

Dos and Don’ts for Writing Your Supporting Statement

Do’s:

  • Be factual: Facts build context quickly and allow you to pack more content within a limited word count (ideally two or so paragraphs , max three-quarters of a page ).
  • Highlight skills, experiences, past achievements, and future goals that align with the job description.
  • Get to the point: A supporting statement has limited space and reader attention. Focus on your unique selling points.
  • Name-drop prestigious companies you’ve worked for.
  • Show research: Mention specific details about the company demonstrating you’ve done your research.

Don’ts:

  • Exceed three-quarters of a page. A lengthy statement is a turn-off.
  • Use unquantifiable words: Avoid generic terms like “excellent communication,” “hardworking,” or “committed.”
  • Focus on what you want from the job: The emphasis should be on what you can offer the company.
  • Treat it like a cover letter: It’s shorter and more focused.
  • Use a generic statement: Tailor each statement to the specific job you’re applying for.

The best supporting statement engages the hiring manager and piques their curiosity to learn more about you and invite you for an interview.

FAQ’s

Is a supporting statement a cover letter?

No. A supporting statement is concise and to the point, while a cover letter is more personalised and longer.

How to end a supporting statement?

End with a call to action, such as offering to discuss your experience further in a phone call or interview.

Ideal length for a supporting statement?

Two paragraphs (less than half a page).

How long is a supporting statement?

As mentioned previously, supporting statement should be ideally no longer than two paragraphs and less than half a page.  at a push you could have three but then you shouldn’t be longer than three quarters of a page. 

What is the best supporting statement?

The best supporting statement is that which engages the  hiring manager,  and stimulates their curiosity to want to know more about you and invite you in for a job interview.

What is the first line of a supporting statement?

 there are no specific first lines from supporting statement however you could start with the following:

Finance professional with over 20 years experience in…

Graduate in physics from the University of Oxford with experience of…

How do you start a supporting paragraph example?

“I’m an experienced [current job title or expertise] with over [list years of experience] of experience working for the likes of  [list companies you’ve worked for]. Expertise include [list areas of specific expertise].  I have successfully [list accomplishments, provide figures where possible].

writing a statement in support of your application

Farhan Raja

I'm Farhan, the Founder and Coach at JobInterviewology.com, one of the world’s leading Career and interview Coaching specialists. Bringing over a decade of industry experience and a passion for guiding individuals in their career journeys. As an Interview and Career Coach, I've authored the eBook '10 Simple Steps to CV & Resume Success,' directed a leading UK CV writing specialist, and pioneered the iPREP interview coaching methodology. My career and interview coaching has spanned over 10 years across diverse industries, from IT giants like Google and Microsoft to vital sectors like Civil Service & NHS, Pharma, Finance, Engineering, Automotive, Construction, Logistics, Banking, and Management Consulting. I've had the privilege of assisting professionals in presenting their best selves, and targeting roles at renowned companies like Amazon, GSK, EY, Shell, Rolls Royce and more.

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How To Write A Supporting Statement For A Job Application With Template

Article Image

Wondering how to write a supporting statement and just what makes one different from a cover letter?

The purpose of a supporting statement, like a cover letter, is to be a summary of your CV, an explanation of how your experience and skills apply to the role you are applying to, and why you want to apply to that particular role. 

Look at a supporting statement as another opportunity you have to share with your potential employer why you are everything they are looking for and more as an employee. 

Read on for our tips which will help you to write a stand-out supporting statement.

Supporting statement vs cover letter

As previously stated, supporting statements are extremely similar to cover letters, so let’s discuss a supporting statement versus a cover letter and why the distinction is important. 

Both cover letters and supporting statements explain to your potential employer why you are applying to a role and what skills , knowledge, and experience you have that will help you find success in the role. 

The main difference is that a cover letter is usually a separate document that is sent with your CV while a supporting statement is included in the application form and answers a statement like “please explain why you are perfect for this role”. 

How to write a supporting statement

A supporting statement needs to explain why you are the perfect for the role you are applying for by illustrating how your past experiences, skills and achievements provide evidence you’ll excel in the role.

You need to write a supporting statement that speaks directly to the employer’s wants and needs and here are some tips on how to write a supporting statement so it does just that. 

The first step, and perhaps the most important step, is figuring out what the employer wants from the supporting statement. 

Some employers will ask you to explain why you are suitable for the role while others may ask you why you are applying and why you want to be hired. 

The second step is to figure out the best way to structure the supporting statement so that you show how you have the key skills highlighted in the job description.

The third step is to decide how you want to describe the skills you possess. 

This might be done by highlighting a project that allowed you to exercise a specific skill or a presentation that allowed you to put multiple skills into practice.

How long should a supporting statement be?

Finding a balance for the length of your supporting statement is important so that you take advantage of the opportunity to promote yourself, but don’t waffle.

The easiest way to know how long you should make your supporting statement is if the employer specifies a character or word limit.

However, if there is no word limit, a good supporting statement length is no more than two pages, with 1.5 pages being a good target. 

This length allows you to share all your competencies in a concise and focused way that will ensure that employers will keep their attention on your supporting statement.

writing a statement in support of your application

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Answer the question

When you are writing a supporting statement, especially when it is a section on the job application form, you need to make sure that you are expressly answering what the employer is asking.

As previously stated, sometimes applications will ask questions like ‘what skills do you have that make you the perfect match for this role?’, but others may ask why you want the role or why you’re suitable for the role.

As such, you’ll need to write a custom supporting statement for each job you apply for, making sure your response is tailored to the question at hand and the individual job description.

Making a custom supporting statement also shows that you took the time to research the company you are applying for and shows just how interested you really are in the role. 

Supporting statement template

Below is an annotated supporting statement template to demonstrate the best practices for writing and formatting.

supporting statement template

How to write a supporting statement for a job application: a summary

Essentially, to write a strong supporting statement, you should know what makes you the best applicant for the job, and convey that to the employer.

A custom supporting statement directly answering the question set by the employer is the perfect way to grab their attention and help you get your dream job. 

At PurpleCV , we understand how important it is to stand out and we can help you create the perfect supporting statement that will impress any potential employer.

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writing a statement in support of your application

Write a Brilliant Supporting Statement

5 Tips to Write a Brilliant Supporting Statement

A cover letter is something that’s become requested less frequently by recruiters in recent years. With many CVs now being submitted by email or via an online system, it’s rare you’ll be asked to submit a cover letter; what is more common, however, is being asked to provide a ‘supporting statement’.

What’s a supporting statement exactly? It’s pretty much the same as a cover letter! A supporting statement is your opportunity to provide some context to your CV and tie together your experience and skills with why you want to apply for this particular role.

The idea of writing a supporting statement might seem like a drag, however you should think of this as an extra opportunity to tell your potential employer how brilliant you are and make a great first impression.

Here are some of Webrecruit’s top tips to help you get started and write a stand-out supporting statement:

1. Make it bespoke

Searching for a new role is time consuming and if you’re applying for several jobs at once, the idea of writing a unique supporting statement for each one can be exhausting.

However, we can’t stress the importance of a bespoke supporting statement enough. Copying and pasting something generic that covers all bases just isn’t going to get you noticed in such a competitive market.

If you’re applying to the company directly or you’re aware of who the end employer is, take a look at their website and the work they’ve completed so far. Does a particular project interest you? Pop a line in your statement saying ‘I love the work that you completed for XX company, it’s right along the same lines of what I like to create, which is why I feel that I’d be the ideal match for your organisation.’

This shows that you’ve taken the time to research what they do and you’re interested in working for them, rather than just applying for any job you can find. Make them feel special.

If you’re applying through an online job advert where you don’t know who the end employer is, pick some of the key details out of the advert about the role and relate it back to your experience and the results you’ve achieved.

2. Don’t just repeat your CV

When trying to explain why your experience is a good match for the company, it can be tempting to just repeat everything already listed in your CV. However, this can lead to a long, boring supporting statement.

Think of your supporting statement as your opportunity to explain why you want to work for the company and why your skill-set is a suitable match for what they’re looking for, rather than just reeling off details of your previous roles.

3. Triple check spelling and grammar

Just like when you create your CV, don’t spend hours crafting a perfect supporting statement only to have it dismissed within a few seconds because you’ve made spelling mistakes.

After you’ve finished writing your supporting statement, read it back carefully. Then read it for a second time, aloud. You might feel a bit silly but it’s easier to identify any mistakes or clunky sentences when you read it out loud.

If you get the opportunity, ask someone else to read through your statement as well. Nothing beats a fresh pair of eyes for picking out a typo!

4. Keep it short and easy-to-read

Recruiters will be looking at dozens of applications every single day so keep your supporting statement as short and succinct as possible, ideally no more than one A4 document in length.

Write in short paragraphs to avoid any walls of text and choose a clear, appropriate font, such as Arial, to ensure that your statement is easy-to-read.

5. Always refer back to the job advert

When constructing your supporting statement, always have a copy of the job advert that you’re applying for in front of you. Note down the specific skills being asked for in the advert and make sure that you refer back to these at all times; try not to go off on a tangent.

Recruiters want to see how you meet the criteria for the role in question, so the easier you make this for them, the better.

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How To Write a Supporting Statement When Applying To a Job

14 November 2023

Introduction to Writing a Supporting Statement

In the competitive world of job applications, where countless candidates are vying for the same positions, it's essential to have a tool that allows you to shine as a standout candidate. A well-crafted supporting statement, also known as a personal statement or a cover letter, is that powerful tool. It serves as your voice, your unique story, and your opportunity to capture the attention of prospective employers and demonstrate why you're the perfect fit for the job.

writing a statement in support of your application

The importance of a supporting statement cannot be overstated. It is often the first document a hiring manager or recruiter reads when considering your job application. In this section, we will delve into what a supporting statement is, why it's crucial, and what purpose it serves in the job application process.

What is a Supporting Statement?

A supporting statement is a personalized document that accompanies your job application. While your resume provides a snapshot of your qualifications, work history, and skills, a supporting statement takes your application a step further. It provides a platform for you to convey your enthusiasm for the position, showcase your unique qualities, and demonstrate how your background aligns with the requirements of the job.

In essence, a supporting statement is your opportunity to shine. It's the place where you can tell your story, provide context to your professional journey, and make a compelling case for why you are the ideal candidate. It is a dynamic document that allows you to express your personality, your drive, and your aspirations.

The Purpose of a Supporting Statement

A supporting statement serves several essential purposes in the job application process:

  • Highlighting Your Uniqueness: It's your chance to stand out from the crowd. While your resume may share commonalities with other candidates, your supporting statement is where you can emphasize your distinctive qualities and experiences.
  • Demonstrating Your Fit: Your supporting statement should bridge the gap between your qualifications and the job requirements. It's your platform to demonstrate that you not only meet the criteria but that you are an excellent fit for the role.
  • Conveying Enthusiasm: Employers are not just looking for skills and experience; they want individuals who are passionate about the position and the company. Your supporting statement allows you to express your enthusiasm and commitment to the role.
  • Creating a Personal Connection: It humanizes your application. It provides a narrative that helps recruiters and hiring managers relate to you on a personal level, making it more likely that they will remember your application.
  • Providing Context: If you have gaps in your employment history, a career change, or specific circumstances that require explanation, your supporting statement offers the space to provide context and mitigate potential concerns.

In essence, your supporting statement is your chance to make a compelling case for why you should be invited for an interview. It's the tool you can use to connect the dots between your background and the job's requirements. When written effectively, it can significantly increase your chances of moving to the next stage of the hiring process.

To help you understand the key components of a supporting statement and how to craft each section effectively, we've divided this article into ten sections, each providing guidance, tips, and examples. By the end, you'll have the knowledge and confidence to create a supporting statement that sets you apart and positions you as an ideal candidate for the job.

Now, let's dive into the subsequent sections, starting with "Why Do You Need a Supporting Statement?" to explore further the significance of this document in your job application.

A supporting statement, also known as a personal statement or cover letter, is a written document that accompanies your job application. It serves as a vital component of your application package, allowing you to present a personalized narrative that complements your resume.

Key Characteristics of a Supporting Statement

What distinguishes a supporting statement from other job application documents? Here are some key characteristics:

  • Personalized: A supporting statement is a highly personalized document tailored to a specific job or role. It should reflect your unique qualities, experiences, and aspirations.
  • Complementary: While your resume provides a comprehensive list of your qualifications and work history, a supporting statement complements it by offering context and insights into your professional journey.
  • Engaging: The document should be engaging, capturing the reader's attention from the outset. It is your chance to make a memorable impression on potential employers.
  • Narrative: It takes the form of a narrative that weaves your professional story. This narrative approach helps create a personal connection between you and the employer.
  • Qualitative: While a resume focuses on quantitative data such as work experience and qualifications, a supporting statement emphasizes the qualitative aspects, including your passion, drive, and alignment with the job.

Purpose of a Supporting Statement

The primary purpose of a supporting statement is to convey to the employer that you are not only qualified for the job but also an excellent fit for the role and the organization. Here's what a supporting statement accomplishes:

  • Expressing Fit: It demonstrates how your background aligns with the requirements of the job. This includes highlighting your relevant skills, experiences, and qualifications.
  • Showcasing Personality: A supporting statement gives you a platform to express your enthusiasm, passion, and personality, making you a more relatable candidate.
  • Highlighting Uniqueness: You can emphasize the qualities and experiences that set you apart from other applicants. It's your chance to stand out.
  • Providing Context: If there are gaps in your employment history, a career change, or specific circumstances that need explanation, a supporting statement allows you to provide context and address potential concerns.
  • Capturing Attention: It serves as your opportunity to capture the attention of recruiters and hiring managers, compelling them to delve deeper into your application.

A supporting statement is, in essence, your voice in the job application process. It allows you to convey your unique story and position yourself as an ideal candidate. Crafting a compelling supporting statement is crucial for advancing in the hiring process and securing an interview.

Now that you understand what a supporting statement is and its significance, let's move on to the next section, "Types of Supporting Statements," where we'll explore different formats and when to use them.

The Structure of a Supporting Statement

As you embark on crafting your supporting statement, it's essential to understand the typical structure that this document follows. A well-organized supporting statement enhances readability and ensures that you convey your qualifications effectively. Here's the typical structure:

1. Introduction

The introduction is your opening statement and should grab the reader's attention immediately. It sets the tone for the rest of your supporting statement. In the introduction, you should include:

  • Your enthusiasm: Express your enthusiasm for the position and the organization.
  • The job you're applying for: Clearly state the job title you're applying for and any reference number or specific details, if available.
  • A brief overview: Provide a concise overview of what your supporting statement will cover, such as your qualifications and why you're an ideal candidate.

2. Professional Background

In this section, delve into your professional background. Include details about your work experience, educational qualifications, and any relevant certifications or training. This section should highlight your qualifications and set the stage for the reader to understand your journey.

3. Key Skills and Achievements

Highlight your key skills and achievements. Discuss the specific skills and accomplishments that make you a strong candidate for the job. Use concrete examples and quantify your achievements whenever possible to provide evidence of your capabilities.

4. Alignment with the Role

Explain how your skills, experience, and achievements align with the requirements of the job. Discuss how your background makes you a good fit for the position, and why your unique qualities set you apart from other applicants.

5. Company and Job-Specific Information

Research the company and the job thoroughly. In this section, demonstrate your knowledge of the organization, its values, and how you see yourself contributing to its mission. Tailor your supporting statement to show that you're not just seeking any job, but this job in this particular company.

6. Future Contributions

Discuss what you envision contributing to the company in the future. Provide insights into how your role could positively impact the organization and what long-term value you can bring to the table.

7. Conclusion

Conclude your supporting statement by summarizing your qualifications and expressing your eagerness to discuss your application further in an interview. End on a positive and forward-looking note.

Keep in mind that these are general guidelines, and the structure may vary depending on the job application requirements. Some positions or organizations may have specific questions or prompts that you need to address in your supporting statement. Always read the job posting and application instructions carefully to tailor your supporting statement accordingly.

Now that you have a solid understanding of the typical structure, let's move on to the next section, "Writing Tips for a Standout Supporting Statement," which will provide insights into crafting an effective supporting statement.

Research and Preparation

Before you begin writing your supporting statement, thorough research and preparation are key. This section will guide you through the essential steps to ensure you are well-prepared to craft a compelling document.

1. Understand the Job Description

Start by carefully reading and understanding the job description provided by the employer. Pay attention to the specific qualifications, skills, and qualities they are seeking in a candidate. Take note of any keywords or phrases that appear in the job description.

2. Research the Company

Investigate the organization you're applying to. Learn about its values, mission, culture, and recent achievements. A deep understanding of the company will allow you to tailor your supporting statement to align with its goals and values.

3. Identify Your Unique Selling Points

Reflect on your strengths, skills, and experiences that make you a strong candidate for the position. Consider what sets you apart from other applicants. These unique selling points will be the foundation of your supporting statement.

4. Gather Supporting Evidence

It's essential to back up your claims with evidence. Collect examples from your professional experience that demonstrate your skills, accomplishments, and qualifications. Use specific instances and data to provide credibility to your supporting statement.

5. Create an Outline

Before you start writing, create an outline for your supporting statement. Organize the information you've gathered into a logical structure that aligns with the typical format discussed in the previous sections. Having an outline will make the writing process smoother and help you stay on track.

6. Address Potential Concerns

If you have any gaps in your employment history, career changes, or other aspects of your background that may raise questions, be prepared to address them. Honesty and transparency can work in your favor, so formulate a thoughtful response for any potential concerns.

7. Tailor Your Statement

While you may have a general supporting statement, remember that it's crucial to customize it for each application. Use the information you've gathered during your research to tailor your statement to the specific job and company you're applying to. Address their needs and how you can meet them.

Research and preparation are the building blocks of a compelling supporting statement. Taking the time to understand the job and the employer, identify your unique strengths, and gather evidence will enable you to write a document that stands out to recruiters and potential employers.

In the next section, we'll delve into the writing process and provide tips for creating a standout supporting statement.

Tailoring Your Supporting Statement

Tailoring your supporting statement is a crucial step in the application process. Employers appreciate candidates who take the time to customize their documents, as it demonstrates a genuine interest in the specific job and company. In this section, we'll explore how to tailor your supporting statement effectively.

1. Analyze the Job Description

Begin by thoroughly analyzing the job description. Identify the key requirements, qualifications, and responsibilities mentioned in the posting. Take note of any specific skills, experiences, or attributes the employer is seeking.

2. Match Your Qualifications

Once you have a clear understanding of what the employer is looking for, match your qualifications to these requirements. Highlight your relevant skills, experiences, and achievements that align with the job description. Use specific examples to illustrate how you meet each criterion.

3. Use Keywords

Employers often use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to screen and filter resumes and supporting statements. To increase your chances of passing through these systems, incorporate relevant keywords from the job description. These are usually the skills, qualifications, and industry-specific terms used by the employer.

4. Show Cultural Fit

Every company has its unique culture and values. Tailor your supporting statement to reflect your alignment with the company's culture. You can do this by mentioning specific values, mission statements, or corporate goals that resonate with you. Showcase how your values match those of the company.

5. Address Their Needs

Emphasize how you can address the specific needs and challenges of the employer. Whether it's solving a particular problem, achieving business goals, or contributing to a project, make it clear that you are the solution they are seeking.

6. Keep it Concise

While customization is essential, ensure that your supporting statement remains concise and focused. Avoid overwhelming the reader with excessive details. Stick to the most relevant qualifications and experiences that make you the ideal candidate.

Remember that tailoring your supporting statement is not about starting from scratch for every application. Instead, it's about strategically adapting your existing statement to highlight the qualifications and attributes most relevant to the job at hand.

In the next section, we'll provide guidance on structuring and writing your supporting statement effectively.

Highlighting Your Skills and Experiences

Effectively showcasing your skills and experiences in your supporting statement is crucial to convince employers that you are the right candidate for the job. In this section, we'll discuss how to highlight your qualifications in a compelling way.

1. Identify Key Skills and Experiences

Start by identifying the key skills and experiences that make you a strong candidate for the position. Review the job description and consider your past roles, projects, and achievements that align with the employer's requirements. These should be specific to the role you're applying for.

2. Use Quantifiable Achievements

Whenever possible, use quantifiable achievements to demonstrate your abilities. Numbers and data can provide concrete evidence of your accomplishments. For instance, if you increased sales revenue, improved project efficiency, or led a successful team, include specific figures to illustrate the impact you've made.

3. Provide Relevant Examples

Share concise, specific examples of how you've applied your skills and experiences to achieve positive outcomes in your previous roles. Use the STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) to structure your examples. This helps employers understand your problem-solving and decision-making abilities.

4. Tailor Your Content

Customize the information you present to emphasize the qualifications most relevant to the job. Avoid listing every skill and experience you possess, as this can overwhelm the reader. Instead, focus on the ones that directly address the job's requirements.

5. Show Continuous Learning

Highlight your commitment to professional development and continuous learning. Mention any relevant certifications, courses, or training programs you've completed. This demonstrates your dedication to staying updated in your field.

6. Highlight Transferable Skills

Don't overlook transferable skills. Even if your previous roles were in different industries, many skills are applicable in various settings. Emphasize how these transferable skills can benefit the prospective employer.

7. Be Concise and Clear

Your supporting statement should be clear, concise, and well-organized. Avoid lengthy paragraphs and jargon. Use bullet points or short paragraphs to make it easier for employers to scan and absorb the information quickly.

By effectively highlighting your skills and experiences, you provide employers with a clear picture of your qualifications and what you can bring to the organization. In the next section, we'll discuss the importance of tailoring your statement to the specific job you're applying for.

Writing a Convincing Introduction

Your supporting statement's introduction plays a pivotal role in capturing the attention of potential employers. It serves as your first opportunity to make a memorable impression and set the stage for the rest of your statement. In this section, we'll delve deeper into crafting an introduction that is not only engaging but also leaves a lasting impact.

1. Start with a Hook

Imagine you're sitting in a room filled with other candidates, all vying for the same job. How can you stand out in such a crowd? It begins with a captivating hook in your supporting statement's introduction. A hook can take many forms, from an intriguing fact or a thought-provoking question to a brief but compelling anecdote related to your career or the job you're applying for.

For example, you might start with a question like, "Have you ever dreamed of working for a company that values innovation and creativity as much as I do?" or share a success story in a single sentence, "In my previous role as a marketing coordinator, I led a campaign that resulted in a 25% increase in customer engagement." These hooks are designed to grab the reader's attention immediately.

2. Express Enthusiasm

Employers not only seek candidates with the right qualifications but also those who are genuinely enthusiastic about the role and the company. Your introduction is the ideal place to express this enthusiasm. Begin by clearly stating your interest in the position and the company. For instance, "I am excited about the opportunity to join [Company Name] as a [Job Title]." This simple sentence demonstrates your passion for the role.

3. Address the Employer's Needs

One of the most effective ways to engage employers is to show them that you have a deep understanding of their needs and the specific requirements of the job. In your introduction, briefly allude to how your skills and experiences align with these needs. This immediate relevance will instantly communicate that you've done your homework and comprehend what the company is seeking in an ideal candidate.

For example, "I was drawn to [Company Name] because of its commitment to sustainability, and my background in environmental science positions me well to support your eco-friendly initiatives as an environmental analyst." This aligns your qualifications with the company's mission and the job description.

4. Mention Your Background

While brevity is key for an introduction, you should also briefly introduce yourself by mentioning your background and qualifications. Provide a concise summary of your current or most recent role, highlighting key achievements and qualifications that are directly relevant to the job you're applying for.

For instance, "As a seasoned project manager with a track record of delivering complex initiatives on time and within budget, my experience is closely aligned with the demands of the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]." This introductory statement sets the stage for the reader to delve deeper into your supporting statement for more comprehensive details about your professional journey.

5. Keep It Brief

While it's essential to incorporate all these elements, it's equally important to maintain brevity in your introduction. In a highly competitive job market, employers often have numerous applications to review. Therefore, your introduction should be concise and to the point, ideally kept to a few sentences. A succinct but impactful introduction is more likely to capture the attention of employers who are pressed for time and inundated with applications.

By crafting an effective introduction, you set the tone for the rest of your supporting statement. It should not only intrigue the reader but also encourage them to continue reading to learn more about your qualifications and why you're the ideal candidate for the job. In the following sections, we'll dive into the main body of your supporting statement, exploring ways to showcase your skills, experiences, and why you're the perfect fit for the position.

Addressing Key Selection Criteria

One of the essential aspects of writing an effective supporting statement is addressing the key selection criteria set by the employer. These criteria are specific qualifications, skills, or attributes that the employer deems necessary for the job. They often serve as a guideline for evaluating candidates. In this section, we'll explore how to address these criteria in your supporting statement to enhance your chances of securing the position.

1. Identify the Key Selection Criteria

The first step in addressing key selection criteria is to clearly identify what these criteria are. This information is typically provided in the job advertisement, job description, or person specification. Employers often list these criteria as bullet points or a checklist of skills and qualifications they are looking for in an ideal candidate.

Take the time to carefully read and analyze the job posting, highlighting or noting down each selection criterion. These are the qualifications and attributes you need to address in your supporting statement.

2. Create a Matching Table

A helpful strategy for addressing key selection criteria is to create a matching table. This table helps you clearly outline how your qualifications, skills, and experiences align with each criterion. It allows you to make a direct connection between your background and what the employer is seeking.

For each criterion, create a row in your table and include columns for the following details:

  • The selection criterion
  • Your relevant qualifications or experience
  • Examples or achievements that demonstrate your suitability

This matching table can serve as a valuable reference while crafting your supporting statement. It ensures that you address each criterion systematically, leaving no room for oversight.

3. Incorporate STAR Method

The STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) is a widely used approach to addressing key selection criteria. It helps you structure your responses and provides a clear and concise way to explain how you meet each criterion. Here's how to use the STAR method:

  • Situation: Start by describing the situation or context in which you encountered a relevant challenge or opportunity.
  • Task: Explain the specific task or goal you needed to achieve within that situation.
  • Action: Describe the actions you took to address the task or challenge, including the skills and qualities you employed.
  • Result: Highlight the positive outcome of your actions, focusing on achievements and benefits to the organization.

Using the STAR method helps you provide concrete and specific examples that demonstrate your competency in each criterion. It also makes your supporting statement more engaging and persuasive.

4. Prioritize Relevance

While it's important to address all the key selection criteria, prioritize relevance. Some criteria may be more critical to the role than others. Ensure that you dedicate sufficient space and emphasis in your supporting statement to the criteria that have the greatest relevance to the job.

Highlight your most relevant qualifications and experiences, ensuring they stand out prominently in your statement. If the job has a long list of criteria, it may not be feasible to provide extensive detail on every point. Focus on the most significant aspects that showcase your fitness for the role.

5. Tailor Your Statements

Each criterion is unique, and your responses should reflect that individuality. Tailor your statements to directly address each criterion and emphasize the relevant skills and qualifications. Avoid using a generic, one-size-fits-all approach, as it can appear less compelling to employers.

Consider the specific wording and language used in the criterion and incorporate those keywords into your responses. This demonstrates your attentiveness to the employer's expectations and helps your application pass through applicant tracking systems.

Addressing key selection criteria is a critical component of a supporting statement. It allows you to provide concrete evidence of your suitability for the role and significantly enhances your chances of being shortlisted for an interview. The matching table, STAR method, and relevance prioritization are invaluable tools to ensure your responses are targeted and effective.

Conclusion and Call to Action

As you reach the final stages of crafting your supporting statement, it's essential to conclude on a strong note and provide a clear call to action. This section will guide you on how to wrap up your statement effectively and encourage the employer to take the next step, which could be inviting you for an interview.

1. Summarize Your Key Points

In the conclusion of your supporting statement, briefly summarize the key points you've highlighted throughout the document. This serves as a quick recap of your qualifications, skills, and experiences that make you a strong candidate for the position. Keep it concise and impactful.

For example, you can say, "In summary, my extensive experience in project management, strong analytical skills, and a proven track record of meeting deadlines make me an ideal candidate for the Project Manager position at XYZ Company."

2. Express Enthusiasm and Fit

Convey your enthusiasm for the job and your belief in your suitability for the role. You want to leave the employer with a positive impression of your genuine interest in the position. Show how your values align with the company's mission and culture.

For instance, "I am excited about the opportunity to join ABC Company and contribute to its innovative projects. My passion for cutting-edge technology and my dedication to teamwork perfectly align with your company's values."

3. Encourage Further Action

In your call to action, express your eagerness to discuss your qualifications further. Politely invite the employer to take the next step, which is typically scheduling an interview. This shows your proactive approach and eagerness to move forward in the hiring process.

Here's an example of a call to action: "I am eager to discuss in more detail how my skills and experiences can contribute to the success of your team. I welcome the opportunity for an interview at your earliest convenience. Please feel free to contact me at [your phone number] or [your email address]." Be sure to include your contact details for easy reference.

4. Thank the Reader

Express gratitude for the time and consideration the employer has given to reviewing your supporting statement. A polite thank you at the end leaves a positive impression and shows your professionalism. For example, "Thank you for considering my application and taking the time to review my supporting statement."

5. Proofread and Format

Before finalizing your supporting statement, ensure that you carefully proofread it for any errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation. A well-written document is more likely to leave a positive impression. Additionally, confirm that the formatting and layout are consistent and visually appealing.

Finally, remember to save your supporting statement in a compatible format, such as PDF, to ensure it's easily readable by the employer.

6. Signature and Contact Information

Below your call to action, include a professional signature and your contact information. This should include your full name, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn profile, if applicable. A well-structured signature adds a personal touch to your supporting statement and makes it easy for the employer to reach out to you.

By following these guidelines, you can conclude your supporting statement on a positive and engaging note. A well-crafted conclusion and call to action leave a strong impression and encourage the employer to move forward with your application.

Using for Job Applications

Now that you've perfected your supporting statement, it's time to put it to good use. is your trusted platform for job applications, and it offers a seamless way to connect with potential employers. Here's how to leverage effectively in your job search:

1. Profile Creation

Before you start applying for jobs, it's crucial to create a compelling profile. Your profile is your digital resume, and it should showcase your qualifications, work experience, skills, and supporting statement. Make sure to complete all the necessary sections, and don't forget to upload your supporting statement as a document or include it in your profile summary.

2. Job Search and Alerts

Jobsora offers a user-friendly job search feature that allows you to find relevant job listings in your preferred location and field. Use filters to narrow down your search based on job title, company, location, and more. You can also set up job alerts to receive notifications about new job postings that match your criteria. This feature saves you time and ensures you don't miss out on exciting opportunities.

3. Applying for Jobs

When you find a job that aligns with your career goals and qualifications, it's time to apply. Make sure to read the job description carefully and tailor your supporting statement to match the specific requirements of the position. Uploading your supporting statement to your application can set you apart from other candidates and give employers a clear picture of your skills and experiences.

4. Tracking Applications

Our platform provides a handy feature that allows you to track the status of your job applications. You can easily monitor which jobs you've applied to, the date of application, and whether the employer has viewed your application. This helps you stay organized and follow up on applications as needed.

5. Networking and Building Connections

Networking is a valuable aspect of the job search process, and offers opportunities for connecting with employers and professionals in your field. Join relevant groups and communities to engage in discussions, seek advice, and build connections. These interactions can lead to valuable insights and potential job opportunities.

6. Interview Preparation

If your application is successful and you're invited for an interview, use to prepare. Research the company, review your application and supporting statement, and practice for common interview questions. can serve as a central hub for your job search, interview scheduling, and communication with employers.

7. Stay Updated

Our site regularly updates its platform with new job listings, features, and resources. Make sure to stay informed about any changes or improvements that can enhance your job search experience. The platform is designed to make your job search journey as smooth and efficient as possible.

By utilizing, you have a powerful tool at your disposal to streamline your job applications, connect with employers, and find the ideal job that matches your qualifications and career aspirations. Remember to maintain an active and engaging profile, stay organized in your applications, and leverage the platform's features to your advantage. Your next career opportunity may be just a few clicks away.

writing a statement in support of your application

PSW

Supporting Statement Examples – Complete Writing Guide

Sometimes, in order to come up with a great supporting statement, you need to first have a clear understanding of what you’re trying to say. One way to do this is to use a supporting statement example.

A supporting statement is a written statement that can be included in many job applications. Any employer could ask you to write a supporting statement, although they’re most popular in applications for education, the public sector, and non-profit organizations.

This article will show you how to write a supporting statement.

The supporting statement gives you the opportunity to show how you meet all of the critical and, if possible, desired criteria in their unique specification.

A person specification is a document that outlines the skills and abilities that the employer expects you to possess in order to complete the job successfully. It highlights the necessary abilities, experience, and expertise for the position.

The criteria could be in the form of a grid or a list, with each criterion labeled as either “important” or “desirable.”

Be aware that some individual specifications will require you to download a separate document.

Your supporting statement will be evaluated against the person specification criteria, and the employer will decide whether or not to invite you to the next stage of the interview process. In most circumstances, this will be the stage of the interview.

It’s Good To Know: 500 Word Personal Statement Examples

How To Write A Supporting Statement For A Job Example

A supporting statement is used to clarify or amplify the information provided in other documents or to provide information that was not included elsewhere.

When writing a supporting statement, it is important to remember that the goal is to provide additional information that supports the application or claim. The statement should be clear, concise, and to the point. It is also important to ensure that all of the information in the statement is accurate and up-to-date.

writing a statement in support of your application

If you are not sure how to write a supporting statement, or if you need help starting, a good place to start is by using a supporting statement template. A supporting statement template will provide you with a framework for writing your statement and will ensure that you’ve included all of the key information.

Make sure you’ve read the directions for the supporting statement (if any), so you know exactly what to add before you start. We recommend utilizing the template below if you haven’t been provided any special requirements for the supporting statement.

Also, if there even is one, take the time to read the role’s person specification attentively, as this document will be crucial in putting up your supporting statement.

Here are some steps to writing a supporting statement:

1. Introduce Yourself

How to introduce yourself in a supporting statement? The first paragraph should introduce yourself and provide a quick explanation of who you are and why you are the best candidate for the job, such as “I am an award-winning fundraiser with extensive corporate experience.” It is critical to present yourself in a strong and positive light right from the outset.

Look at this example:

“I am a gold medallist graduate of XYZ University with a degree in Nursing with one year of experience working as a nurse at a well-known hospital, XYZ. I am interested in obtaining a position as a Registered Nurse at your hospital.

My education and experience have prepared me to be a valuable asset to your team. I am confident that I have the potential to be a great nurse, and I look forward to discussing this opportunity further with you.”

Remember to include your name and address in both the accompanying statement and your CV. You would like to make it as simple as possible for the employer to figure out who you are if they become separated.

2. Write About The Institution/Organization

You’ll have to explain why you desire this exact career and to work for this specific company, which will need some background in your study. Explain how your goals, methods, and beliefs align with theirs, as well as what impresses and attracts you to the institution/organization.

3. Highlight And Proof Your Skills/Abilities

Then, using examples from your expertise, go over all of the requirements and desirables included in the person specification and describe how you satisfy them. Wherever possible, use real examples and data, such as “improved efficiency by 25% while saving over £10k from the initial budget.”

Make sure the supporting statement reflects your personality and demonstrates your motivation and enthusiasm. Make positive statements about oneself, such as “I have…” rather than “my previous employer has…” Bullet points and powerful, energetic verbs can help add oomph to your application.

4. Use The STAR Model

You must ensure that your responses have some order while composing your supporting statement. The STAR model is a useful tool for organizing your supporting statements.

  • S–Situation\s

writing a statement in support of your application

It’s critical to stick to the structure of the essential criteria to avoid missing anything. It also aids in evaluating your abilities, qualities, and experiences that would assist you in fitting into the job or firm.

5. Conclusion

Your final line should reiterate your passion for the position and that you are the ideal candidate for it.

3 Tips To Write Supporting Statement

Thoroughly read and keep the following tips in mind while writing your Supporting Statement!

1. Keep It To The Point And Brief

Recruiters don’t want to read pages of prose, so make your supporting statement as short as possible while still containing all of the needed information. Avoid exaggerating and repeating things. Try to keep your introduction to the point and concise and avoid being over-smart.

Here is such an example of supporting statement:

“Hello, my name is ________ and I would like to apply for the job of ________. I am the most qualified person for this job. Not only am I intelligent and have a great work ethic, but I also have the required experience. In addition, I have superb interpersonal skills that will enable me to build relationships with clients. Consequently, I will be able to increase business for the company.

I am also proficient in QuickBooks and I have a strong understanding of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). I consider myself an ideal candidate because I have excellent communication skills and I am able to work well both independently and as part of a team. I’m confident that I can be a valuable asset to your team. I look forward to the opportunity to interview for the position!”

Keep this example in mind and now look at this one:

“I am a recent graduate of XYZ University. I’m interested in obtaining a position as a Junior Accountant with your company. I have a strong background in accounting, and I am very detail-oriented. I am confident that I have the skills and qualifications that you are looking for in a Junior Accountant. You will find me to be a well-qualified candidate for the position. I would be grateful for the opportunity to interview for the position.”

Follow the same with the rest of your application. Just keep it concise and to the point. After you’ve completed it, go back and eliminate anything that isn’t necessary. Additionally, have a friend or co-worker proofread the statement before sending it.

Consider your language and phrases to make a great impact. You can even utilize the same language and words used by the business in the job description and person specification.

2. Use A Criteria

Consider using the criteria as subheadings within your statement or numbering your paragraphs to indicate which criterion you’re talking about if the criteria are numbered. Similar criteria should lie in a group together wherever possible and logically to save time, space, and the repeating of your evidence throughout the statement.

Explain why and how something satisfies the criteria, not just what you’ve done. If you can’t think of any relevant instances for the role you’re applying for, think of where you can demonstrate the criteria in your previous experience and write about it.

3. Proofread before submitting

Before you email it, get some comments from friends, family, or job counselors. Compose your statement in a word document before putting it into the application – this will allow us to make adjustments, check spelling and punctuation, and also save your work as you go. If you are invited to an interview, save a copy of your supporting statement so you may read it and familiarise yourself with it before going.

How to End a Supporting Statement

I am confident that I have the skills and experience required for the role, and I can assure you that I will be a valuable asset to your team. I am motivated and eager to learn, and I am confident that I can make a positive contribution to your organization. I’m confident that I have the skills and experience required for the role, and I can assure you that I will be a valuable asset to your team. I am motivated and eager to learn, and I am confident that I can make a positive contribution to your organization.

1. Re-emphasise Your Suitability for the Role

I am confident that I have the skills and qualities that you are looking for in a candidate, and I am eager to put my abilities to work for your company. I have a strong track record of success in similar roles and can provide specific examples of how I have exceeded expectations in the past. I’m a motivated and hardworking individual who is always looking for new challenges, and I believe that I would be a valuable asset to your team.

2. Highlight Your Key Selling Points

I am confident that I have the skills and qualities that are essential for the role, and I am keen to utilize my strengths in order to achieve success for the company. I am excited to be given the opportunity to discuss my candidacy further and look forward to hearing from you.

Showcase Your Skills and Experience

I’m a highly motivated and enthusiastic individual with a proven track record in sales. I have a strong desire to achieve success and exceed targets. I’m confident in my ability to build relationships with clients and have a strong interest in fashion. My skills and experience include:

– Excellent communication and interpersonal skills

– Proven experience in a sales role

– Strong knowledge of the fashion industry

– Highly organized and efficient

– Excellent time management skills

– Proven ability to work under pressure

3. Reiterate Your Interest In the Role

Your supporting statement should be a concise overview of your qualifications and experience that are relevant to the role you are applying for. It is important to be specific and relevant and to avoid general statements or to pad your statement with irrelevant information.

What to Avoid at the End of a Supporting Statement

A supporting statement should highlight your skills and experience that are relevant to the role you are applying for. It should also reiterate your interest in the role.

Here are a few things to avoid at the end of your supporting statement:

– Restating your resume

– Saying you are the best candidate for the role

– Saying you are interested in the role

– Thanking the reader for their time

– Avoid using clichés

– Don’t use generic statements

– Don’t ramble on

Supporting Statement Examples

There are many different types of supporting statements, and each one is designed to serve a specific purpose. Some of the most common examples of supporting statements include:

– Academic Support Statements

– Employment Support Statements

– Personal Statements

– Character References

Example 1: Supporting Statement on a Job Application

You can also take ideas from our job supporting statement examples below:

“I am writing to apply for the [position] position at your company. I am a gold medallist in Business Administration from ABC University. I’m confident that I have the skills and experience that would make me the perfect candidate for the job.

I have worked in a [position] position for the past [number of years], and I have gained a lot of experience in the field. I am knowledgeable about the [industry] industry, and I’m confident that I can be a valuable asset to your team.

I’m excited to have the opportunity to learn and grow in a new environment. I’m confident that I can be a valuable member of your team. Looking forward to hearing from you soon!”

[Your name]

Example 2: Supporting Statement for a Scholarship Application

“I have worked hard in school and have been involved in many extracurricular activities. I am passionate about learning and I am confident that I will be a valuable asset to your institution.”

Further, you can add your curricular and co-curricular achievements that can help you win the scholarship. Just keep in mind not to exaggerate anything and keep things to the point.

Example 3: Supporting Statement Examples for a Cover Letter

“I have recently graduated from ABC University with a degree in Business Administration. I am extremely interested in obtaining a position as a Business Analyst with your company. My education, combined with my experience working as a Business Analyst intern for ABC Company, has given me the skills and knowledge I need to be successful in this role. I am confident that I have the potential to be a valuable asset to your team, and I look forward to discussing this opportunity further with you.”

For a nurse:

“I am a fresh graduate of XYZ University with a degree in Nursing. I’m interested in obtaining a position as a Registered Nurse at your hospital. My education and experience have prepared me to be a valuable asset to your team. I am confident that I have the potential to be a great nurse, and I look forward to discussing this opportunity further with you.”

As a graphic designer:

“I am writing to apply for the position of Graphic Designer that was recently posted on your website. I’m a recent graduate of ABC University with a degree in Graphic Design. I have experience working as a Graphic Designer for ABC Company, and I am confident that I have the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in this role. I am excited to take your firm to next level by creating top-notch designs with my skills and expertise.”

Length Of Supporting Statement

Now you might be thinking of the length of the supporting statement that you are going to write. So how long should a supporting statement be?

Some applications will require you to meet a word count. It is critical that you adhere to this guideline and do not deviate from it. If there isn’t a word count, 1-2 pages of writing are recommended.

Supporting Statements Templates

Here are some good supporting statement templates. Each one is designed to serve a specific purpose. Keep in mind that don’t copy-paste them, just take ideas from these samples. 

Supporting Statement Template For Job

I’m interested in becoming a teaching assistant because I believe that all children should have equal access to education. I also believe that this position will allow me to gain this experience while simultaneously assisting youngsters with a variety of learning difficulties. There is no greater thrill for me than being able to gain new talents while overcoming obstacles. This is something I believe I found for myself while volunteering at a local elementary school. I am a very creative person that enjoys reading, writing stories, listening to music, and creating art. My abilities and inventiveness, I feel, will also help me support other sections of the curriculum, such as Numeracy and Science.

I recently finished a teaching program that required me to create a lesson plan for a specific target audience. I had the option to interact with a local primary school and also an educational psychologist as part of my research. Both offered me valuable insight into how to effectively design my lesson plan. I was also able to put my strategy to the test with the help of my nine-year-old cousin. That research has given me a glimpse of the value of differentiation, enabling me to provide essential help to slow learners while simultaneously pushing gifted students.

I’ve also learned about alternative teaching approaches, such as using audio, visual, and kinaesthetic elements, and I’ve tailored my lesson plan to include them. I gained crucial problem-solving abilities as well as creative talents that would enable me to come up with the necessary solutions to assist youngsters in overcoming problems as a result of the program. Working as a teaching assistant, I believe, will provide me with an excellent opportunity to put my academic knowledge into practice.

Supporting Statement Example Customer Service

I am a dependable, diligent, timely, and eager individual. I’ve also received compliments on my ability to be a creative chef. Food preparation is a hobby of mine. I enjoy encountering new people because I think that living with various types of individuals with various personalities can benefit me in various sectors of the community. Traveling, reading, and studying more about numerous themes addressing various health issues are some of my interests and hobbies.

Every one of these issues is really significant to me since I believe these are related to several areas in which I am especially interested, such as customer service and hospitality. Food safety, customer service, basic first aid, IT abilities, and customer care are all talents that I have acquired individually. These are highly promising accomplishments for me. I’ve learned new abilities and gained a better comprehension and knowledge of people skills. With people of various levels, I have excellent communication abilities. This, I believe, has helped me grow into a more understanding person in the long run, as well as one who is encouraging and non-judgmental.

Considering my seven years of experience in customer service and also similar industries like retail and sales, I believe I am also familiar with the type of environment I would want to work in. I’ve learned a lot from the various unpleasant experiences I’ve had, such as dealing with difficult clients and determining what the customers’ true needs are. All of my own experiences in this profession have made me a stronger and more focused individual. I’ve worked in a Customer Service/Relations atmosphere for seven years and have enjoyed every minute of it.

I’ve honed my communication skills and customer service techniques.

I appreciate the variety of working with clients. I’m aware of the challenges that come with dealing with tough customers or circumstances such as complaints, returns that are not warranted, and so on. I prefer to work in a thorough and structured way, using lists and maintaining records and logs to keep track of my calls and customers, as well as who I need to contact and by what date. Also, I believe that providing excellent customer service is critical. I strive to ensure that I am attentive to my customers’ needs and expectations while also performing my obligations as a Customer Service Representative.

I work professionally, pay close attention to detail, and have a calm and disciplined demeanor when dealing with consumers. I’ve gathered enough expertise to deal with complaints and difficult instances, and I maintain a positive attitude at all times. I’m looking for more responsibility and believe I’ve reached a point where I can manage more customer accounts or lead a team of assistants. I’m excited to continue my career in customer service, which I enjoy. I’ve received any internal customer service awards, training, or anything else you’re proud of. This, I believe, will be a valuable asset I own.

Writing a supporting statement either for a job or any other application is very critical. Your statement can lead to both sides either winning the job or losing it. So, make sure you write your supporting statement following a guide. Keep the important points in mind that we have discussed above.

Don’t write a statement without the help of an experienced one. If you need a supporting statement for a council job or another job, you can hire our professional and experienced writers.

We would like to help you in writing the best supporting statement.

https://www.bmj.com/content/350/sbmj.h3359

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15326977ea0401_3

writing a statement in support of your application

Author & Editor Team: : Adila Zakir, Alexa Smith

Our review panel has been working in academic and non-academic writing for more than 1 decade.

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Sample Supporting Statements

For Students and Newly Registered Nurses, Nursing Support Workers, and Nurses and Midwives.

The supporting statement is the most important part of your job application. This is effectively where you convince the employer that you're the right person for the job and explain why they should hire you.

This page offers sample supporting statements and a tutorial to help you. we can also offer feedback on your supporting statement via email..

Different employers will have different instructions or expectations with regards to supporting statements, but generally they'll be looking to see if you're applying for the right reasons and that you meet the essential criteria. If you haven't already done so, read the general advice on writing job applications first. To help give you an idea, have a look at our sample supporting statements which have been written to correlate to a sample Person Specification. In particular, pay attention to the way the sample supporting statements:

  • Cover all the essential criteria listed in the Person Specification
  • Use examples or evidence to demonstrate how the criteria is met
  • Follow the order of the Person Specification as much as possible.

The samples should be used as a guide only. Your own supporting statement should be structured around the job and person specification you're applying for. You may also want to watch the Supporting Statements tutorial below.

  • Apply for jobs that are right for you
  • Never write a 'one size fits all' supporting statement
  • Explain why you want the job, showing your passion/interest and motivation
  • Demonstrate how you meet all the essential criteria from the person specification using examples or evidence
  • Demonstrate how you meet any organisational/trust values if there are any
  • Imagine you're being asked the question, "Why should we hire you?"
  • Run a spelling and grammar check

Supporting Statement Tutorial Preview

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Supporting Statements

These are often found in online applications and are used to explain to the employer how you fit what they're looking for.

What is a supporting statement?

A supporting statement is often found as part of an online application form.   The role that you are applying for will have a list of selection criteria (the person specification), and your supporting statement is your opportunity to explain the employer how you meet the criteria. It will be marked against the criteria to determine which candidates to take forward to the next stage, often an interview.

Some employers will use an alternative title for a supporting statement; some might refer to it as a ‘personal statement’, or ‘additional information (in support of your application)’. Usually the application form will outline what they expect with a phrase such as ‘please outline your skills and experience in relation to the criteria for this post’. If it’s not clear what the employer requires, get in touch with them to clarify this before you complete your application.

If you’re writing a personal statement as part of an application for postgraduate study this is slightly different: there is specific advice on our Personal Statements for Postgraduate Applications information page.

Writing to the criteria

Address all their criteria systematically:

  • Work through the criteria in the same order the employer used in their specification – they will probably be using this same list to mark applications, and keeping the order the same makes it really easy for them to work with.
  • Use their criteria as headings to signpost what you are writing about.
  • If there are too many criteria and a tight word limit, you could address groups of related criteria with similar evidence – adjust the headings to reflect this.
  • Mirror their language. It’s not just OK to repeat the phrase that the employer has used in the selection criteria, it’s vital that you do. This is what they’ll be reading to find, so by using the phrase you’ll help them locate the evidence for your candidacy. In some case recruiters use an AI reader to scan the applications, and they might not be programmed to recognise synonyms.

Using examples

Prove that you have the skills by giving evidence for each criterion, rather than just stating that you have the skill or experience:

  • Focus on the aspects of the example that are transferable into this new role, the details of the broad approach you took and the skills/abilities involved.
  • Include numbers or percentages where you can to add context of size/scale/scope (e.g. rather than ‘developed positive working relationships with my team’, you could say, ‘developed positive working relationships with all 12 of my team members’.
  • Keep your language positive.

For example, if you’re applying for a management graduate scheme, as evidence for interpersonal skills you might say:

I demonstrated my interpersonal skills when I employed tact and diplomacy, explained complex information clearly, developed rapport with colleagues and customers and defused tensions during stock shortages, as part of a team of 4 supporting over 200 customers a day.

Rather than:

I had to challenge customers returning items without receipts, regularly told customers about the confusing store card loyalty scheme, got on well with shop floor staff and calmed down angry customers when we ran out of ice cream.

If you find writing like this challenging, you can use text generative AI to give you some ideas to get started. In your chosen application upload a de-personalised version of your CV and ask it to suggest how you meet each criteria in turn. The responses you get won’t be great, but they will be a start you can build on. 

If you have the space and a relatively short list of criteria, you could choose to give STAR examples for each competency they’re looking for – see more about this in our STAR Technique information page .

If you don’t have an example

If you don’t have evidence for a criterion, don’t just ignore it, or (even worse!) apologise. Avoid starting sentences with a negative, such as: ‘Unfortunately, I don’t have experience of…’. Instead, outline the indirect or related evidence that you do have. For example, if you’re applying for a job which has a criterion ‘experience of a sales environment’, and you’ve not worked in that area before, you could instead highlight that you have experience of related aspects of a sales environment:

As someone who regularly uses communication and influencing skills as an ambassador for the University with prospective students, works to targets in my part time delivery role, and has a track record of achieving results in my academic work, a sales environment will allow me to continue to combine these skills.

Managing the word count

Some employers will have a word limit, and you can use this to balance your statement. For example, if the limit is 1500 words and there are 10 criteria you need to address, you know that on average, you should be spending around 150 words giving your evidence for each criterion.

If there is no word limit, and you have lots of experience, there can be a temptation to write a lot. However, if the statement becomes too long, it’s unlikely that employers will have time to read carefully all the way to the end, and this can result in you losing marks. Instead of giving all the possible examples, try using a sentence to summarise the range of your evidence, before focusing on one particularly relevant example. If you’re drafting your statement in Word, try aiming for around 1 or 2 sides of A4 with single line spacing.

Final checks

Most online application forms don’t have spelling and grammar check built in, so your final stage should always be:

  • Copy and paste your statement into Word and run a spelling and a grammar check.
  • Proofread it yourself, and ideally get a friend to read it too, sometimes they’ll spot errors that you’ve missed.
  • Save a copy on your computer – you might not be able to access the application form after you’ve submitted it.

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How to write a great supporting statement

If you're applying for a job in the charity sector, a supporting statement can be your biggest opportunity to sell yourself to a potential employer. We share some tips for making sure your skills truly shine.

Hire me, I'm basically amazing

​ One day, there'll be some brilliant bit of technology that scans your brain for all the qualities, skills and experience your prospective employer's been looking for, and delivers a whizzy presentation about them directly to their iPhone 22. It'll be great, if slightly Orwellian.

Until then, most employers depend on application forms, the good old CV (so old we're still using the Latin name), and in most charity and not-for-profit organisations, the all-important supporting statement.

And it really is important, because it's your biggest opportunity to sell yourself to the hiring organisation.

Let's be honest though, it's nobody's idea of fun. If you've already spent hours perfecting your CV or slogging through an employer's 30-page application form (we won't name culprits, but you know who you are...) the last thing you're in the mood for is writing 500 words of chirpy copy about your listening skills.

So here's the first tip: resist the temptation to dash something off just to get it done. It might be the last thing you do but it's often the first thing an employer will read, and first impressions count. Unless you're right on deadline, come back to it when you're fresh and able to really think about your responses.

Speaking of deadlines, if you're applying through a recruiter it's well worth a chat with your consultant to make sure you're totally clear on timings and exactly what's required. The statement has to come from you personally, but there's no reason you can't ask your consultant for feedback, so don't wait until the deadline. Send it over sooner to give yourself time for a second draft if you need it.

So where should you start?

First and foremost, the supporting statement is your opportunity to explain why you want the job - your interest in and attraction to the organisation.

Whether that's down to your knowledge of the organisation from personal contact, research you've done, enthusiasm for what they do, or a great match between their values and yours, make sure it comes across loud and clear. Nobody ever hired the candidate who didn't seem that bothered about getting the job.

Matching the person specification

Application processes across the third sector differ of course, but here's a typical example of what you may be asked:

'Using each of the competencies as a header, please describe how your skills, knowledge and experience meet the requirements of the role as set out in the person specification.'

So, you'll need to take each of the requirements listed in the person specification and describe how you meet them.

By far the best way to do this is to give actual examples from your experience. If you've ever cringed at an Apprentice contestant declaring themselves the best thing since Branson it's probably not (just) because they're a truly terrible human being, but because you've seen nothing to back up their claims. Examples are important.

Using real-life scenarios means you can show, not tell, the employer why you're ideal for the role. Don't just say 'I have strong time management skills' but instead, talk about a project you worked on, a process you implemented, or a system you use that demonstrates your ability to manage multiple tasks and meet deadlines. Focus on what you personally did and how your time management made it work.

Candidate who can fix printer jams

OK, but there are 30 requirements, yet they want a maximum of two pages?

Sadly there's no getting around this one: writing a really good (but concise) supporting statement is never going to be a five minute job. But here are some tips to make it easier:

• Firstly a little recruitment not-so-secret: 95% of person specifications are 95% the same. You know the score: communication skills, attention to detail, ability to multitask, demonstrating initiative, working within a team. Whatever your career, it's likely you'll run into certain requirements again and again. Create a master copy that covers all of these effectively and your future applications are already halfway done. Just be sure to tailor your responses to the role you're applying for, updating examples as your career progresses.

• Speaking of which, even when you're not job-hunting, keep a record of projects that go well, however large or small. Trying to remember a specific instance that highlights your amazing negotiation skills can be tricky at a year's remove, so note it down while it's fresh in your mind.

• Consider grouping requirements together: if a project you worked on clearly demonstrates three different skills, don't write about it three times. Group the skills into a single heading and write about the project once, highlighting each of the qualities in question. Use your judgement though - cutting 30 criteria down to 15 answers may be a sensible way of keeping the length down, but cutting ten down to three might mean you're skimming over things in insufficient detail.

• There might be one or two requirements you don't yet meet (if there are too many it's probably not the right job). It can be tempting to ignore these and hope no-one notices, but you'll create a much more positive impression by acknowledging them and giving an example that shows the employer you can pick up new skills quickly.

​ Spell it out

​ You've already sent your CV and/or filled in an application form: surely if the employer just read these carefully they could deduce that you have all the right qualities?

Possibly yes, but unless you're applying to be Dr Watson, the hiring manager's probably no detective. Don't make them hunt for clues and piece your story together: use the supporting statement to highlight all the factors in your favour and make them crystal clear.

Also remember that the person screening initial applications might not be the actual hiring manager, so try not to assume they'll understand the finer detail of your previous roles. If you want them to know you're the ideal candidate, tell them clearly and explain why in straightforward terms that anyone can understand.

Lastly of course, proofread, proofread and proofread again. That claim about 'accuracy and attention to detail' won't carry much weight if your relationship with spelling and grammar is going through a rocky patch that day. If in doubt, get someone else to read it too, as it's easy to miss things in a piece you've read many times.

Candidate highlighting their tea-making skills

​ So to summarise: make it as easy as possible for the reader to see that you're genuinely keen to work for their organisation, enthusiastic about the role and can demonstrate all the skills and qualities they're looking for. Which - at least until we get that brain-scanning technology - is your best route to getting the interview!

David Young, Director of Marketing, Harris Hill

For more advice on applications and supporting statements, contact any of our specialist consultants ,  call us on  020 7820 7300 or get in touch via [email protected]

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Supporting statements

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How do I write a Supporting Statement?

Sometimes instead of asking for a cover letter, an application form may contain a supporting statement section where you are required to outline the skills, experience, and qualities you possess that make you a suitable candidate for the role. This is an important section of your application and can make or break your chances of getting through to the next stage of the recruitment process.

Structuring your supporting statement

Make a positive introduction to yourself in a short opening paragraph. It is then best to follow the person specification for the role and use the STAR technique to give a detailed account of your experience of that skill. If you've not encountered the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) technique before, watch The Guardian's explanatory video  to show you how it's done.  It can be useful to create headings for each point on the person specification too, as this will allow the person who is shortlisting your application to easily find each point that you are addressing.

Just like a lawyer in a courtroom, you always need to provide evidence to support your claims. The more your examples for each heading are specific (i.e. no one could give this example except you because the details are so specific) , the better the mental picture you will give to the employer. If they can picture you in the role you are describing, they will be able to picture you in the advertised role.

It is useful to conclude your supporting statement with a short positive summary.

What are the top tips for writing supporting statements?

  • Carefully read through the job and person specification information.
  • Ensure that you give evidence for each item the employer has outlined.
  • Before you write your statement in full, spend some time selecting the most appropriate examples to illustrate the skills and qualities required. The first example that you think of isn't necessarily the best one.
  • Using the STAR method can help you to structure your examples in a meaningful way.
  • Write your statement in a separate document (e.g. Microsoft Word) first before entering it into the online application form. This will make it easier to read through and check.
  • Don't assume that an employer will guess or automatically realise that you have a skill. If you don't make reference to an essential item, the employer can't count it as part of your application and you may not get shortlisted for an interview.
  • Check the word count or space allocation for the supporting statement. You want to be concise and to the point without writing pages of words. If there’s no guidance aim for around 500 words. Find out more about how long a supporting statement should be .

How can I learn more?

  • Our Elevator Pitch tool will help you organise your thoughts into a positive, confident, brief statement of who you are - helping you write positive introductions and conclusions. 
  • See our advice on Cover Letters and CVs  for interactive tools to help you learn more.
  • You can book an appointment with an Employability Adviser to check through your supporting statement.

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How to write a supporting statement

A supporting statement is the evidence a manager uses to short list you for the job you’re applying for. It is a chance for you to write about your skills and experiences and how you would be suited to the role.  The statement is likely to be the first impression the manager and organisation have of you so it’s important you take the time to write it.

We can help you understand what managers are looking for, and more importantly, how to lay out your answers in a way that will make it clear to the manager which criteria you are writing about.

Preparation is key and getting everything you need before you start to write your statement will make all the difference.

First draft your supporting statement in a word document. This will make it easier for you to make changes and send it to other people to read over it with a fresh pair of eyes. You can then copy and paste it into the application form. If you have received support to complete your statement, make sure you understand what you’ve written. You will be asked to expand on your supporting statement if you get an interview.

After you have finished writing your supporting statement, read it back carefully. Then read it for a second time, aloud. You might feel a bit silly but it’s easier to identify any mistakes when you read it out loud. It’s important to make sure your spelling and grammar are correct, try to get someone else to read over it before submitting it. Once you're happy with what you've written, you can then copy and paste it into the application form. Things to remember:

  • Write in short paragraphs to avoid a wall of text. Choose a clear font such as Arial, to make sure that your statement is easy to read.
  • Lay your answers out in the same order as the criteria. This will make it easier for managers to find your answers. 
  • Remember to save your work as you go along. The online application form ‘times out’ after 30 minutes.
  • There is a word/character limit. If you don’t have enough space, you can group your answers together. If a project you worked on shows different skills, group them into a single example and write about the project once, highlighting each of the qualities in the question.

Handy tip: Save or print a copy of your application form and the job profile, so that you can read over it in the future. Once the post closes online, you won’t be able to get access to your form again through your online account. You will however be able to get a copy by sending an e-mail to our recruitment team .

Identifying your skills

Your skills can help you choose the career that’s right for you and you already have lots of them. You might pick them up through work, study or activities you do in your spare time. Skills can be developed at school, college or university. You can build them through extra-curricular activities, like clubs or teams you’re a part of.

If you’re able to recognise and talk about your skills, you’ll find it easier to work out what you want to do. When you’re applying for jobs, they’ll be the things that convince employers that you’re the right person for the job.

Handy tip: Look back over your work, studies or leisure activities and think about the tasks you completed in each. For example, if you’ve had a job where you’ve had to work to strict deadlines, you’ll probably have good time management skills. If you’ve been in a debating club, you’ll have developed your communication and persuasion skills.

Researching a company is not only a great way to make sure you’re a good fit for them, but also that the organisation would be a good fit for you.

Why not take some time to look around our website? It’s good to show that you have researched our organisation. If you read about something that interests you, you can add this into your statement, for example: “I was impressed with your regeneration project…”.

We would also encourage you to take a look at our core values , they are very important to us. One of our values is working as one team, this is important as we can see that by working together and making strong connections across the whole organisation, we can make the best use of our resources by focusing on our customers and our communities.

Handy tip: Use your research, and include it in your answers.

writing a statement in support of your application

Using the STAR model

When you are writing your supporting statement, you need to make sure there’s some structure to your answers. The STAR model is a great way to structure your examples.

It’s important to follow the layout of the essential criteria, making sure you don’t miss anything out. It also helps us as employers evaluate the skills, qualities and experiences you have that would help you fit with the job or company.

Here, we will show you how you could use the STAR model to answer the following example question:

Q: Can you give me an example of working as part of a team?

Situation: Describe the situation in which the event took place.

"Whilst in school, I did my Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award.  As part of this I had to work as part of a team to get from one camp site to another".

Task: Describe the task you were asked to complete. If there was a particular problem or issue you were trying to solve, describe that here.

"I was in a group of 4 with my friends. We each had to carry different parts of the equipment we needed, e.g. tent, tent poles and cooking equipment.  I feel I have good communication skills, so I made sure we each knew what each other was carrying, so that we didn't leave anything behind. I was nominated to be first in the group to read the map and use the compass to get us to the first check point which I was happy to do".

Action: Explain what action you took to complete the task or solve the problem: What you did, why you did it, how you did it and what skills you used.

"As a group, we worked well together. Once of the boys was struggling with the weight of his backpack so I suggested we all take some of it and put it in our bags, which made it easier for him to carry on".

Result: Explain the result of your actions. For example, if your actions resulted in completing a task, resolving a conflict, improving your company’s sales record, etc., explain this. Try to focus on how your actions resulted in a success.

"We reached our next camp site within the time allowed. I felt we worked well as a group and talked through anything we were unsure of along the way. My friend felt happy that he completed the walk as he didn't think he would manage to do so, but as a group we encouraged him to keep going, and by going a little slower and taking some of his equipment, we were able to get to the camp in good time".

Handy tip: If you are applying for a graduate role, we will ask you to use the STAR model to demonstrate your skills and how they link to our Strengths Framework when writing your supporting statement . Further information is available on our Graduate Programme page .

Put it into practice

Let’s start writing it down! Once you’ve mastered the research and preparation it’s all about putting it into practice and writing it down. Think of it like a set of cogs, if you miss one out, they won’t work together!

Use real-life examples:

These help to show a manager what you can do and explains why you’re ideal for the role. Instead of ‘I have strong leadership skills’, talk about a project you worked on or a process you implemented.

Always be honest in your application form about previous employment, experience and your role. You may get asked questions about your statement during an interview.

Be clear and concise with your answers:

Don’t make managers hunt for clues and piece together your story. Use the supporting statement to your advantage to show your skills and qualities.

If you don’t meet the essential criteria:

It can be tempting to not write about these and hope no-one notices, be positive by acknowledging them and use an example that gives the employer confidence that you can pick up new skills quickly.

Handy tip: Submit your application form on time! Check the advert to see if there’s a submission time specified. If it doesn’t mention a time, it will be 11:59pm on the date the application closes.

Good luck, and we hope to see you soon!

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Personal statements & application letters, personal statements and application letters.

The process of applying for jobs, internships, and graduate/professional programs often requires a personal statement or application letter. This type of writing asks writers to outline their strengths confidently and concisely, which can be challenging.

Though the requirements differ from application to application, the purpose of this type of writing is to represent your goals, experiences and qualifications in the best possible light, and to demonstrate your writing ability. Your personal statement or application letter introduces you to your potential employer or program director, so it is essential that you allow yourself enough time to craft a polished piece of writing.

1) PREPARE YOUR MATERIALS

Before you sit down to write, do some preparation in order to avoid frustration during the actual writing process. Obtain copies of documents such as transcripts, resumes and the application form itself; keeping them in front of you will make your job of writing much easier. Make a list of important information, in particular names and exact titles of former employers and supervisors, titles of jobs you have held, companies you have worked for, dates of appropriate work or volunteer experiences, the duties involved etc. In this way, you will be able to refer to these materials while writing in order to include as much specific detail as possible.

2) WRITE A FIRST DRAFT

After you have collected and reviewed these materials, it is time to start writing. The following is a list of concerns that writers should keep in mind when writing a personal statement/application letter.

Answer the Question: A major problem for all writers can be the issue of actually answering the question being asked. For example, an application might want you to discuss the reason you are applying to a particular program or company. If you spend your entire essay or letter detailing your qualifications with no mention of what attracted you to the company or department, your statement will probably not be successful. To avoid this problem, read the question or assignment carefully both as you prepare and again just prior to writing. Keep the question in front of you as you write, and refer to it often. Consider The "I" Problem: This is a personal statement; using the first person pronoun "I" is acceptable. Writers often feel rather self-conscious about using first person excessively, either because they are modest or because they have learned to avoid first and second person ("you") in any type of formal writing. Yet in this type of writing using first person is essential because it makes your prose more lively. Using third person can result in a vague and overly wordy essay. While starting every sentence with "I" is not advisable, remember that you and your experiences are the subject of the essay. Avoid Unnecessary Duplication: Sometimes a writer has a tendency to repeat information in his or her personal statement that is already included in other parts of the application packet (resume, transcript, application form, etc.). For example, it is not necessary to mention your exact GPA or specific grades and course titles in your personal statement or application letter. It is more efficient and more effective to simply mention academic progress briefly ("I was on the Dean's List"; or "I have taken numerous courses in the field of nutrition") and then move on to discuss appropriate work or volunteer experiences in more detail. Make Your Statement Distinctive: Many writers want to make their personal statements unique or distinctive in some way as a means of distinguishing their application from the many others received by the company or program. One way to do this is to include at least one detailed example or anecdote that is specific to your own experience—perhaps a description of an important family member or personal moment that influenced your decision to pursue a particular career or degree. This strategy makes your statement distinctive and memorable. Keep It Brief: Usually, personal statements are limited to 250–500 words or one typed page, so write concisely while still being detailed. Making sure that each paragraph is tightly focused on a single idea (one paragraph on the strengths of the program, one on your research experience, one on your extracurricular activities, etc.) helps keep the essay from becoming too long. Also, spending a little time working on word choice by utilizing a dictionary and a thesaurus and by including adjectives should result in less repetition and more precise writing.

Personal Statement Format

As mentioned before, the requirements for personal statements differ, but generally a personal statement includes certain information and can follow this format (see following model).

Introduction Many personal statements begin with a catchy opening, often the distinctive personal example mentioned earlier, as a way of gaining the reader’s attention. From there you can connect the example to the actual program/position for which you are applying. Mention the specific name of the program or company, as well as the title of the position or degree you are seeking, in the first paragraph. Detailed Supporting Paragraphs Subsequent paragraphs should address any specific questions from the application, which might deal with the strengths of the program/position, your own qualifications, your compatibility with the program/position, your long-term goals or some combination thereof. Each paragraph should be focused and should have a topic sentence that informs the reader of the paragraph’s emphasis. You need to remember, however, that the examples from your experience must be relevant and should support your argument about your qualifications. Conclusion Tie together the various issues that you have raised in the essay, and reiterate your interest in this specific program or position. You might also mention how this job or degree is a step towards a long-term goal in a closing paragraph. An application letter contains many of the same elements as a personal statement, but it is presented in a business letter format and can sometimes be even shorter and more specific than a personal statement. An application letter may not contain the catchy opening of the personal statement but instead includes detailed information about the program or position and how you found out about it. Your application letter usually refers to your resume at some point. Another difference between a personal statement and an application letter is in the conclusion, which in an application letter asks for an interview.

3) REVISING THE PERSONAL STATEMENT/APPLICATION LETTER

Because this piece of writing is designed to either get you an interview or a place in a graduate school program, it is vital that you allow yourself enough time to revise your piece of writing thoroughly. This revision needs to occur on both the content level (did you address the question? is there enough detail?) and the sentence level (is the writing clear? are the mechanics and punctuation correct?). While tools such as spell-checks and grammar-checks are helpful during revision, they should not be used exclusively; you should read over your draft yourself and/or have others do so.

As a child I often accompanied my father to his small coin shop and spent hours watching him work. When I was older, I sometimes set up displays, waited on customers, and even balanced the books. This experience instilled in me the desire to own and manage my own business someday, yet I understand that the business world today is more complex. This complexity requires more education, and with that in mind, I am applying to the Master's of Business Administration program at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB). In addition to my helping out in my father’s business, I have had numerous other work experiences that further enhance my qualifications for this program. My resume enumerates the various positions I have held at Kerasotes Theaters, Chili's restaurants, and Indiana University's new Student Recreational Sports Center (SRSC), and what all of these positions have in common is an emphasis on serving the public effectively. Further, as an assistant manager at the Showplace 11 and a staff coordinator at the SRSC, I have gained valuable expertise in managing employees and creating work schedules. Both of these positions have allowed me to develop my sales and people skills, which are extremely important in an increasingly service-driven marketplace. Not all of my work experience has been as a paid employee. Part of my volunteering experience at Middleway House, the local battered women's shelter, involved extensive work on computers, including word processing, organizing databases and creating spreadsheets. Also, I recently participated in an internship program for academic credit with the Eli Lilly corporation in the personnel division. As a management intern, I was able to watch the workings of a major corporation up close and would like the opportunity to combine my experiences with the theoretical background available in the MBA program at IUB, with its emphasis on computers, marketing and human resources. My successful internship is one element of my overall academic success as an undergraduate here at IUB, yet I have also made time for a variety of extracurricular activities, including working for my sorority and competing in intramural basketball. My positive experiences here have resulted in my desire to stay in Bloomington to continue my academic endeavors; furthermore, continuing my education here would allow me to make important business contacts, with the career goal of opening my own computer consulting firm in the Midwest.

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writing a statement in support of your application

How to write a Support Worker cover letter (with examples)

Your Support Worker cover letter, sometimes called a supporting statement, is a one page document submitted alongside your CV. It’s an opportunity to stand out from other applicants and convince the recruiter you’re the right person for the job.

On average, it takes recruiters six seconds to decide if someone is suitable for a job. 1 Therefore, a well written Support Worker cover letter can increase your chances of getting an interview .

If you’re looking for a job as a Support Worker, why not apply for one of our roles at Alina Homecare today? We don’t require a cover letter or CV, so it only takes two minutes to apply!

If you’ve already perfected your Support Worker CV and want your application to stand out, this guide will help you understand what to include in your cover letter. We’ve included tips and examples to give you a better chance of getting an interview.

How to write a Support Worker cover letter

Your cover letter should always be personalised and specific to the job you’re applying for. Therefore, it’s important to research both the job and hiring company so that your cover letter is tailored to the role.

Try not to repeat what’s already in your CV. Instead, provide examples of how your work and life experiences and achievements are applicable to the role of a Support Worker. Take this opportunity to show off your key Support Worker skills and leave an impression on the recruiter. You want to make sure you sell yourself!

Your cover letter needs to be concise but persuasive. Good communication is a key skill for the role of a Support Worker so make sure you demonstrate this throughout.

Your cover letter should follow a clear format and include the following:

  • Introduction

Cover letter header

Your cover letter header is the first thing the recruiter will see so make it look professional. For instance, if you have a header on your CV, follow the same format on your cover letter to create consistency and show professionalism.

Start your Support Worker cover letter by providing your contact details in the header so the recruiter can contact you. This is usually located in the top right hand corner of the page. Include essential information such as your full name, email address and phone number.

On the left hand side, write the names of the recruiter and the company you’re applying to. You should have this information to hand after you’ve done your research on the job role. If it’s not clear who the recruiter is then you can address your cover letter to the Recruiting Manager.

The following image shows how to lay out your Support Worker cover letter header:

Example layout for the header of a Support Worker cover letter

Cover letter greeting

Always start your cover letter with ‘Dear’ and if you know the name of the recruiter, then address them directly.

When addressing someone by their name, you should only use the prefixes Mr. or Ms. If you’re unsure whether the recruiter is male or female, you don’t want to start off on the wrong foot and misgender them. Instead, use their full name, such as ‘Dear Alex Rider’, or you can simply put ‘Dear Recruiting Manager’.

Cover letter introduction

The introduction to your Support Worker cover letter is your opportunity to grab the recruiter’s attention and explain why they should choose you.

Here are some ideas of what you might want to include in your introduction:

  • The role you have applied for. In the opening few lines of your cover letter, it’s a good idea to mention the position you’re applying for. The recruiter most likely receives many applications for other job roles so be clear about the position you’re interested in
  • Your interest in the position and company. What is it that made you apply for the role of Support Worker at this company? Use your research to comment on the values of the company and why you want to work with them
  • Outline your qualifications. Identify any skills or qualifications you have and explain how they would help you to be a great Support Worker. If you’re applying with no previous experience, explain how your previous work and life experiences are applicable to this role

Cover letter main body

Once you’ve explained why you’re a great fit for the role, you want to convince the recruiter you deserve an interview.

Look at the job description to understand the role of a Support Worker and research what qualities they should have. Here, you want to demonstrate you meet as many of the requirements as possible.

Try to relate your skills to the position. For instance, “As a result of working with several service users at the same time, my organisational abilities are exceptional.”

If you’re particularly good at something which isn’t mentioned as a key quality of a Support Worker, don’t be afraid to include it and say how or why this will help you in this role. For example, you could say that you exercise regularly which is good for your mental health and allows you to meet the demands of the role to the best of your ability.

If you have previous Support Worker experience, this is where you want to mention previous successes. Talk about how you’ve gone above and beyond to support service users. Additionally, include any positive feedback that you received from their family members. This could set you apart from other applicants by revealing how you interact with service users and the level of service you can provide.

Don’t worry if you have no Support Worker experience or even no previous work experience at all. If you’re applying for a job for the first time, you can still mention any positions you’ve held in the past. This could include voluntary positions, education or extracurricular activities.

Key qualities of a Support Worker:

  • Passion – be passionate about the support you provide and the needs of the service user. An enthusiastic Support Worker sees their work as a professional duty rather than a job. Ensure your support is focused on the interests of the service user and their families. Go above and beyond to guarantee high quality support is provided
  • Patience & empathy – a good Support Worker is empathetic and can put themselves in the shoes of the individuals they support. This allows you to fully understand the needs of the service user and tailor the support you provide around their requirements. Showing patience and understanding of their needs is essential
  • Encouragement – a key quality is to understand the importance of a positive attitude. Always greet your service users with a smile. Encourage the people you support to lead a fulfilling life and provide support when needed to ensure they achieve their personal goals
  • Reliability – you must be trustworthy and committed to being on time. Be aware of the effect that untimeliness can have on a service user’s routine
  • Respectful – always respect the service users’ decisions. Never assume they cannot make choices for themselves
  • Excellent communication – a good Support Worker can communicate clearly and sensitively with the people they support and their family members. Being easy to talk to and a good listener is extremely important in providing high quality support

Cover letter conclusion

Once you’ve written a convincing case, thank the recruiter for taking the time to read your cover letter and consider your application. In this section, you can repeat your enthusiasm for the role and why you would be a good addition to the company.

Finish your letter with a polite request for an interview so the recruiter knows you’re eager to progress with your application.

Finally, end your Support Worker cover letter with a professional sign off such as ‘Yours sincerely’ or ‘Kind regards,’ followed by your full name.

Cover letter examples

To help you write your Support Worker cover letter, here are two examples below that follow our recommended structure. While submitting a job application could be stressful, these cover letter examples are a starting point to help you.

There are many ways of writing a good Support Worker cover letter. Make sure you don’t use these examples word for word as a unique and personalised letter is more likely to secure you a better outcome!

Example 1 – No previous experience

Dear Mr. Rider,

I’m writing to apply for the position of a Support Worker at [company name] which I have seen advertised on [where]. I believe I would be a great candidate for this role as I have a passion for caring and making a positive difference in people’s lives.

Although I have no previous experience in this sector, I’m enthusiastic about my work. My current employer frequently gives me high praise for my efficiency, teamwork and punctuality. I have excellent listening, organisational and time management abilities from my previous employment, which are all necessary qualities of a Support Worker.

I’m responsible and dependable, and I understand the need to maintain the confidentiality of service users’ information in this role. I have strong administrative skills so I’m confident I can manage multiple tasks at once.

If my application is successful, I aim to put my existing talents to use while also developing new ones at your company. I’m eager to learn new skills and complete any necessary training to ensure that I have the specialised knowledge required to perform my role.

Becoming a part of your team at [company name] will enable me to fulfil my desire to support young adults, allowing them to maintain their independence in daily life. The prospect of working for a growing business and making a positive impact inspires me. I’m eager to demonstrate how my compassionate and enthusiastic attitude may help your service users to have a positive experience.

Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I hope to hear from you with regards to arranging an interview.

Yours sincerely, Jane Doe

Example 2 – Previous experience

Dear Recruiting Manager,

I’m very keen to apply for the position of Support Worker at [company name] as advertised on [where]. With over five years’ experience working as a Support Worker, I believe I would make a strong addition to your team.

In previous positions, I’ve successfully managed a demanding caseload of individuals with varying degrees of learning and physical disabilities. I have experience working with service users in challenging situations and I can handle such matters in a calm and sensitive manner.

I have a caring and compassionate nature, as well as a genuine interest in helping others to lead fulfilling lives. I’m comfortable working with service users of all ages and varying levels of ability. I use my considerate and non-judgemental attitude to carefully determine the needs of the individuals I support.

I always encourage conversation and show joy in listening to service users’ stories about their lives, family and friends to help build trusting relationships. I’m reliable at timekeeping because I understand the effect lateness can have on a service user’s routine. I’m used to working flexible hours, including nights and on weekends.

I’ve recently completed my NVQ Level 3 Diploma in Health & Social Care, and I have certifications in CPR and First Aid. The attached CV provides further details about how my qualifications and previous experience will make me an ideal match for your team.

Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I would be grateful for the chance to be a part of such an amazing company and I hope to hear from you soon to organise an interview.

Kind regards, Jane Doe

Cover letter tips

It’s important to make your Support Worker cover letter personalised and ensure that it represents you. Recruiters receive many cover letters so will be able to tell if you have copied a template from the internet. Use examples to help you but make sure your final copy is unique and customised to the company you’re applying for!

Use these extra tips to add a personal touch:

Writing style – use the right tone to match the company you’re applying for. A cover letter should be professional, but you also want to write in a way that reflects you as a person

Format – match the format and design to your CV. Your cover letter is an extension of your CV, so you want it to be clear the documents are a complete package. If you need help with writing your CV, download our Support Worker CV template

Spell check – make sure your cover letter is free of any grammatical or spelling mistakes. Try to read your cover letter out loud or ask a friend or family member to proofread it for you. You could also use an online program such as Microsoft Word which has a built in spell check function

Be concise – write a cover letter that shows how you fulfil the requirements of a Support Worker. Use your own work and life experiences to show you can do the job. Write about personal or professional achievements but don’t tell a story that is too wordy or long. If you have gaps in your work history, take this opportunity to explain them

Be appropriate – avoid mentioning anything which is not necessary in a cover letter. Don’t mention why you’re looking for a new position in case it comes across as being negative about your current employer. Avoid talking about salary expectations as it’s too early to discuss at this stage. This can make it look like you’re more interested in the benefits the company can provide, rather than how you can benefit the company

Be honest – avoid mentioning anything untruthful or emphasising any skills that you don’t have. If you’re invited for an interview and are asked about any of these, this could be detrimental. Focus only on the skills and experience that you do have and how they can be applied to this job. Make it clear that you’re willing to learn!

Now that you know how to write the perfect Support Worker cover letter, get started now !

Email our Jobs Team or apply below to join Alina Homecare Disability Support.

1. My Perfect CV, “CV Examples and Samples” , Reviewed 19 April 2023

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writing a statement in support of your application

The VA Disability Advocate

writing a statement in support of your application

HOW TO WRITE A COMPELLING STATEMENT TO SUPPORT YOUR CLAIM

Crafting a compelling Statement in Support of Claim for your VA disability application involves detailed storytelling and clear articulation of how your service-related disability impacts your life. A well-structured statement can significantly enhance your claim by providing the VA with a vivid, personal insight into your experiences, challenges, and needs. Below, we expand on each section of your statement to ensure a comprehensive and persuasive narrative.

Start with a detailed introduction of your military service. This should include:

Branch of Service and Unit: Clearly state your branch and unit, providing a foundation for understanding your military background.

Service Duration and Locations: Mention the total years served and key locations, especially those relevant to your claim.

Roles and Responsibilities: Describe your MOS or specific duties, focusing on aspects that relate directly to your disability claim.

Detailed Account of the Event:  If a specific event is at the heart of your disability:

Event Description: Provide a chronological narrative of the event, including the date, location, and what transpired. Use descriptive language to convey the intensity or seriousness of the situation.

Your Role in the Event: Detail your involvement, actions taken, and any immediate consequences you faced.

Eyewitness Accounts: If available, include statements from others who witnessed the event, adding credibility and perspective to your account.

Description of Your Disability and Its Impact:  This section is crucial for illustrating the breadth of your disability's impact on your life:

Physical and Emotional Toll: Discuss specific physical limitations or symptoms you experience. Describe the emotional and psychological effects, such as PTSD, anxiety, or depression, emphasizing how these have altered your daily life.

Professional and Social Impact: Detail any changes in your job performance, career trajectory, or employment status. Discuss the strain or changes in relationships and social activities, highlighting any isolation or withdrawal you've experienced.

Comparison of Pre- and Post-Service Life: Offer a vivid comparison of your abilities, hobbies, and quality of life before and after your service. This contrast can powerfully illustrate the disability's impact.

Medical Treatment and Response

Treatment Timeline: Provide a detailed timeline of your medical treatments, including dates, healthcare providers, and treatment outcomes. This demonstrates the ongoing nature of your disability and your efforts to address it.

Accessibility and Efficacy of Treatments: Discuss any challenges in accessing care or limitations in treatment efficacy. This can highlight the complexity and severity of your condition.

Personal Testimony

Personal Reflections: Share your personal journey in adapting to life with your disability. This might include mental health struggles, the challenge of redefining your identity post-service, or the daily realities of living with a chronic condition.

Hopes and Frustrations: Articulate your hopes for improvement or fears about the future. This section adds depth to your narrative, showing the human element behind the claim.

Supporting Testimonies

Family and Friends Observations: Incorporate statements from those close to you, detailing their observations of your struggles and changes since your service. These perspectives can underscore the broad impact of your disability.

Professional Insights: If applicable, include observations from your employers or colleagues about changes in your work performance or behavior, lending further evidence to your claim's validity.

Conclusion and Appeal for Support

Summary of Your Situation: Concisely summarize the key points of your narrative, reinforcing the severity and legitimacy of your disability.

Appeal for Understanding and Support: End with a respectful appeal to the VA for support, emphasizing the critical role of the benefits in maintaining your dignity, independence, and quality of life.

Writing Tips for Clarity and Impact

Narrative Flow: Ensure your statement has a logical flow, with each section smoothly transitioning into the next. This helps maintain the reader's engagement and understanding.

Emotive Language: Where appropriate, use emotive language to convey the intensity of your experiences and the depth of your struggles. This can make your statement more compelling and memorable.

Proofreading: Thoroughly proofread your statement or have someone else review it for errors and clarity. A polished, error-free statement reflects the seriousness of your claim well.

By meticulously crafting each section of your Statement in Support of Claim, you significantly strengthen your VA disability claim, ensuring that the VA fully comprehends the profound impact of your service-related disability on your life.

(Current Clients): Please use these forms to submit your statement

VA Form 21-0781  PTSD Statement - Personal Statement (Read This First)

VA Form 21-0781a PTSD and MST Secondary to Personal Assault - Personal Statement (Read This First) 

VA Form 21-10210 Lay Witness Statement -  Buddy, Family, and Friends Statements

VA Form 21-4138 General Statements  - Can be used for any VA benefit

SAMPLE LETTER :

[Your Name]

[Your Service Number/SSN]

[Your Address]

[Email Address]

[Phone Number]

Department of Veterans Affairs

Claims Intake Center

PO Box 4444 Janesville, WI 53547-4444

Subject: Service Connection for Lumbar Strain

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am writing to apply for service-connected compensation for a lumbar strain that initially occurred in 1989 while I was stationed at Fort Polk, Louisiana. During a field exercise, I was involved in lifting a generator off a truck, which resulted in immediate back pain. I sought medical attention at the base's sick call, where I was prescribed 800mg of Ibuprofen and placed on a temporary profile.

Despite the initial care, I continued to experience lumbar pain throughout my service. However, fearing stigma and potential negative attention from my unit, I refrained from seeking further medical assistance. This decision, driven by a concern for my career and unit cohesion, has had lasting repercussions on my health.

After my service, my access to medical care was severely limited, and it wasn't until 2012, through my employment, that I was able to seek treatment for my ongoing back pain. Over the past three years, I have been under the care of a private chiropractor. Recent X-rays have confirmed the presence of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) and bulging discs, conditions that trace directly back to the injury I sustained while in service.

The impact of this injury has extended far beyond my service and into my personal and professional life. I am currently enrolled in a pain management program to manage the constant discomfort and limitation of mobility. My ability to perform at work has been compromised, leading to periods of unemployment and financial strain. Furthermore, the pain and subsequent treatment have caused me to miss significant life events and opportunities to spend time with my family, contributing to a decreased quality of life.

I have attached all relevant medical records, including the documentation from my initial visit to sick call in 1989, records from my chiropractic care, and the recent X-rays and diagnoses. These documents substantiate the origin of my lumbar strain during military service and its progression to my current condition.

I request that the Department of Veterans Affairs recognize the service connection of my lumbar strain and its subsequent conditions. Granting this claim would not only validate the physical suffering I have endured since my service but also provide the necessary support to manage my health moving forward.

Thank you for considering my claim. I am ready to provide any additional information or documentation required. I look forward to your response and hope for a favorable review of my case.

Conclusion:

When filing a VA disability claim, providing comprehensive evidence to support your case is vital. Statements in Support of Claim offer a valuable opportunity to strengthen your claim by providing crucial details, additional information, and personal testimonies. These statements substantiate the event that caused your disability, offer insights into its impact on your life, establish pre-service and post-service comparisons, and personalize your claim. Gathering and including these statements significantly enhances your chances of obtaining the disability compensation you deserve. The collective power of these statements adds depth, context, and humanity to your claim, ensuring that decision-makers have a comprehensive understanding of your unique circumstances.

The VA Disability Advocates Main Office is Located in Las Vegas, NV. We Represent Veterans throughout the United States. 702-992-4883 

Mastering the Personal Statement Format: A Guide

Craft a standout personal statement with essential elements. Impress admissions committees with your compelling narrative.

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When it comes to college and university admissions, the personal statement assumes a paramount role in setting applicants apart from their peers. A meticulously constructed personal statement becomes an instrument of utmost significance, empowering individuals to exhibit their distinctive qualities, experiences, and aspirations to discerning admissions committees. 

Recognizing the significant influence of a well-crafted personal statement on an individual’s academic journey, this article aims to provide aspiring students with a comprehensive guide to excel in the art of creating impactful personal statements.

By exploring the definition and purpose of personal statements and offering invaluable writing tips and strategies, this guide assists users in mastering the format of a compelling personal statement.

Definition Of Personal Statement

A personal statement is a written document typically required as part of the application process for educational institutions, scholarships, job opportunities, or other significant life events. It serves as a unique and personalized representation of an individual’s background, experiences, achievements, and aspirations. 

The personal statement offers applicants a chance to showcase their personality, passions, and motivations, allowing them to stand out and make a compelling case for their suitability for the position or opportunity they are seeking.

Purpose Of A Personal Statement

The primary purpose of a personal statement is to provide the admissions committee, employer, or selection panel with deeper insights into the applicant’s character, values, and potential. Beyond the information provided in other application materials, such as grades or resumes, a personal statement delves into the applicant’s story, offering a glimpse into their life journey and how it has shaped their ambitions and goals.

By presenting a well-crafted personal statement, applicants aim to:

  • Demonstrate their suitability: Applicants can use the personal statement to highlight how their skills, experiences, and passions align with the requirements of the institution or position they are applying for.
  • Convey their uniqueness: A personal statement enables applicants to showcase what sets them apart from other candidates and demonstrate their individuality, perspectives, and strengths.
  • Exhibit strong communication skills: Crafting an engaging and articulate personal statement reflects an applicant’s ability to express ideas clearly and persuasively, a crucial skill in many fields.
  • Show commitment and motivation: By explaining their motivations and aspirations, applicants can convey their dedication and determination to succeed in the chosen field of study or profession.

Admissions Process Overview

The admissions process varies depending on the institution or opportunity being pursued. However, the general steps involved in the admissions process include:

  • Research and exploration: Prospective applicants research various educational institutions, job opportunities, or scholarships to identify the ones that align with their interests and goals.
  • Application submission: Applicants complete the required application forms and submit supporting documents, which may include academic transcripts, letters of recommendation, resumes, and the personal statement.
  • Review by admissions committee or employer: The admissions committee or employer evaluates all received applications, assessing candidates based on their academic achievements, experiences, qualifications, and the content of their personal statements.
  • Selection and decision-making: After careful evaluation, the institution or employer makes decisions regarding acceptance, job offers, or scholarship awards.

Components Of A Successful Personal Statement

A successful personal statement should incorporate the following components:

  • Introduction: A compelling opening that grabs the reader’s attention and provides a glimpse of the applicant’s personality and background.
  • Personal narrative: A well-structured and engaging account of the applicant’s life experiences, including challenges faced, significant achievements, and pivotal moments.
  • Clear goals and aspirations: A demonstration of the applicant’s future plans, showing how the opportunity they seek aligns with their long-term objectives.
  • Relevance to the opportunity: A clear connection between the applicant’s experiences, skills, and motivations with the specific program, job, or scholarship they are applying for.
  • Demonstration of qualities and strengths: Showcase of key attributes, such as leadership, adaptability, problem-solving abilities, and teamwork skills, supported by relevant examples.
  • Reflection and growth: Demonstrating how past experiences have shaped the applicant’s personal and professional development and how they have learned from challenges.
  • Conciseness and clarity: Effective communication with a focus on coherence, relevance, and avoiding unnecessary details or jargon.
  • Positive tone: A positive and optimistic outlook that leaves a lasting impression on the reader.
  • Proofreading and editing: Thoroughly reviewed and edited to ensure impeccable grammar, spelling, and overall presentation.

Personal Statement Format: The Basics

The personal statement is a critical component of various applications, providing applicants with a platform to present their unique qualities, experiences, and aspirations. 

In this section, let’s explore the fundamental format of a personal statement, comprising the introduction paragraph, body paragraphs, and conclusion paragraph . Understanding these elements will empower applicants to effectively communicate their story and convince the reader of their suitability for the desired opportunity.

Introduction Paragraph

The introduction paragraph marks the beginning of the personal statement and serves as a gateway to the applicant’s narrative. Here, applicants aim to capture the reader’s attention, provide essential background information about themselves, and present the overarching theme or purpose of their personal statement. The introduction sets the tone for the entire document and offers the opportunity to make a memorable first impression.

Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs constitute the heart of the personal statement, where applicants delve into their experiences, accomplishments, and motivations in greater detail. Each body paragraph should revolve around a distinct topic or aspect of the applicant’s life that aligns with the central theme established in the introduction. Here, applicants can showcase their personal growth, relevant skills, and how specific experiences have shaped their aspirations. By providing compelling evidence and anecdotes, the body paragraphs reinforce the applicant’s suitability for the opportunity they are pursuing.

Conclusion Paragraph

In the conclusion paragraph, applicants bring their personal statement to a thoughtful close. This section restates the main points highlighted in the body paragraphs, emphasizing the alignment between the applicant’s journey and the sought-after opportunity. The conclusion may also include reflective insights, demonstrating self-awareness and an understanding of the potential impact they could make in the future. A well-crafted conclusion leaves a lasting impression, leaving the reader with a sense of the applicant’s character and potential.

Formatting The Personal Statement Essay

When crafting a well-structured personal statement, the writer must not overlook the importance of proper formatting. The arrangement of text, choice of font, and adherence to specific guidelines can significantly influence the essay’s overall impact and readability. Here are the key components of formatting that contribute to the transformation of essays into polished and impactful pieces of writing.

Font And Size

The recommended font for academic essays is typically Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri. The standard font size is 12 points. This size ensures that the text is clear and readable without being too large or too small. Avoid using fancy or decorative fonts as they can distract from the content and may not be as legible.

Margins And Spacing

The standard margins for an essay are usually set at 1 inch on all sides (top, bottom, left, and right). This margin size provides a neat and balanced appearance to the document. Some institutions or formatting guidelines may require specific margin sizes, so it’s essential to check the requirements provided by the institution or instructor.

For spacing, the most common format is double-spacing throughout the entire essay. Double-spacing makes the text easier to read and allows space for comments or corrections if the essay needs to be reviewed or graded. However, some guidelines may require single-spacing for specific elements like block quotes or reference lists. Always follow the specific instructions, if available. 

Essays often have a specific page limit or word count that students must adhere to. The page limit indicates the maximum number of pages that the essay can occupy. If there is no specified page limit, the general guideline is to aim for around 1.5 to 2 pages for a standard personal statement essay.

If a page limit is provided, it’s essential to stay within that limit. Going significantly over the page limit may result in a bad impression, in some cases, the essay being rejected outright. On the other hand, if the essay is shorter than the specified page limit, students should use the extra space to expand on their ideas or provide more supporting evidence.

Writing Tips And Strategies for Personal Statement Format

Crafting a compelling personal statement is a crucial step in various application processes, whether it’s for college admissions, scholarships, or job opportunities. This document offers applicants a chance to stand out from the crowd and present their unique qualities, experiences, and aspirations. To create an impactful personal statement, consider the following writing tips and strategies:

Show Don’t Tell Strategy

One of the most effective ways to engage the reader and make your personal statement memorable is by employing the “Show Don’t Tell” strategy. Rather than simply stating facts or qualities about yourself, use vivid and specific examples to illustrate your strengths, experiences, and character traits. Instead of saying, “I am a determined and resilient individual,” provide a story that demonstrates your determination and resilience in overcoming a challenging situation. By showing your qualities through compelling narratives, you allow the reader to connect with your experiences on a deeper level.

Start With An Outline Or Brainstorming Session

Before diving into writing, take the time to create an outline or engage in a brainstorming session. Jot down key points, experiences, and ideas that you want to include in your personal statement. Organize them logically to form a coherent structure. Having a clear outline or list of ideas will help you maintain focus and prevent your personal statement from becoming disjointed. It will also ensure that you cover all essential aspects of your life and aspirations, creating a comprehensive and well-rounded essay.

Reflect On Your Experiences

Take time to reflect on your life experiences, both personal and academic. Identify significant events, challenges, achievements, and moments that have shaped your character and influenced your goals.

Showcase Your Authenticity

Be genuine and authentic in your writing. Avoid using clichés or trying to present yourself as someone you’re not. Admissions committees and employers appreciate honesty and real-life experiences.

Structure Your Statement

Organize your personal statement with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and a strong conclusion. The introduction should engage the reader, while the body paragraphs should provide evidence and examples to support your central theme. The conclusion should leave a lasting impression and reiterate your main points.

Provide Concrete Examples

Support your claims and assertions with specific examples, anecdotes, or achievements. Concrete evidence strengthens your statement and helps the reader connect with your experiences.

Address Weaknesses, But Stay Positive

If you have any weaknesses in your application, such as low grades or employment gaps, you can address them in your personal statement. However, always maintain a positive tone and focus on how you have learned from those experiences and improved.

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Law school applications: five common myths

Caroline schroeder, a louisiana state university graduate in history and spanish, received eight offers to study a law degree. here, she shares her tips for a successful law school application..

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Caroline Schroeder

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If you’ve ever found yourself reading online forums for law school applicants, such as Law School Data and Reddit’s r/lawschooladmissions, I believe you should be entitled to some financial compensation for emotional damages.  

While both resources do provide some relevant statistical data and advice from actual admissions officers, they are drowned out by the sites’ most active and vocal forum users.  

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After months of scrolling through these unreliable sources and comparing them to advice of actual college deans and admissions counsellors, I have compiled the five most common myths about the law school application process.  

1. Law school admissions officers read hundreds, maybe even thousands, of applications every year, so try to stand out from the crowd.  

This isn’t like applying to university as an undergraduate, where everyone is in competition to be the most extraordinary person.  

Law schools are looking for lawyers, not characters for a movie. A good lawyer is calm, controlled, reasonable and level-headed.   

Would a lawyer write a character and fitness statement in the format of a legal brief? Would a lawyer make an off-colour remark in an interview? Would a lawyer get a letter of recommendation from someone they know hates them?  

Most likely they wouldn’t. It’s best to avoid doing anything a good lawyer wouldn’t. In other words, don’t try to be edgy and just allow your achievements so far to speak for themselves.   

2. Don’t get personal    

People often say this as a rebuttal to that first myth. Sure, there is some truth to this. Don’t get too personal. The admissions committee probably doesn’t need to know about your love life etc.  

However, you can still share stories of personal struggle if they are applicable. For example, one student shared a story about the trauma of growing up in foster care and their decision to be an advocate for foster children. Although this was deeply personal, it was well received because the applicant kept the message focused on their resiliency, their commitment to advocacy, and the type of law that interests them.  

3. When choosing between two applicants with similar stats, legal work experience can be the deciding factor in one applicant’s favour.  

If you’re still unsure whether a legal career is right for you, it might be helpful to work as a paralegal before committing to law school, but don’t do it just for an entry on your resume.   

While legal work experience might help you personally, it is not a requirement for an admissions counsellor reading your application. Truthfully, applicants with experience in the legal sector are dime a dozen. However, some work experience, in any sector, can help you understand whether a career path is the right fit.  

Best universities for law degrees Best universities for law degrees in the US Best universities for law degrees in the UK Best universities for law degrees in Canada Best universities for law degrees in Australia

4. The best letters of recommendation come from people high up: CEOs, college deans, and well-known public figures.  

This is sort of true. Dean Andrew Cornblatt of Georgetown University has mentioned that letters of recommendation from a college dean are rare. When these appear in an application, it grabs the committee’s attention.  

However, these fancy letterheads can’t do all the heavy lifting. In the rare event that an applicant secures such a recommendation, it’s unlikely to be too different from other recommendation letters.  

If your company’s CEO doesn’t know you but you have a great relationship with your manager or direct supervisor, ask them instead. The quality of the letter and the depth of information they share is much more important than the signature.  

5. Lie as much as possible.  

Although no one says this outright, as far as I know, it’s worth reiterating that honesty is the single most important quality for any potential lawyer to have, and therefore the quality that you should emphasise most in your application.  

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    Creating a strong supporting statement includes using specific keywords from the job description, highlighting relevant skills and qualifications, giving examples of past accolades and keeping the statement concise yet comprehensive. To make a statement stand out, customise it for each job application, mention the employer's name when possible ...

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    A supporting statement is often found as part of an online application form. The role that you are applying for will have a list of selection criteria (the person specification), and your supporting statement is your opportunity to explain the employer how you meet the criteria. It will be marked against the criteria to determine which ...

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    2. Don't get personal. People often say this as a rebuttal to that first myth. Sure, there is some truth to this. Don't get too personal. The admissions committee probably doesn't need to know about your love life etc. However, you can still share stories of personal struggle if they are applicable.

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