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Tata Motors Case Study: History, Business Model, Products, Financials, Peers, and SWOT Analysis

From the streets of Mumbai to the prestigious avenues of London, the growls of Tata Motors engines echo across the globe. This Indian automotive giant has come a long way, evolving from a locomotive manufacturer to a diverse automobile powerhouse.

In today’s blog, we will delve into the world of this fascinating company from exploring its rich history to ambitious plans. 

Table of Contents

Overview 

Tata Motors is India’s 3rd largest automobile company and is a leading global manufacturer of cars, utility vehicles, buses, trucks, and defence vehicles. Tata Motors was incorporated in the year 1945 and was a part of the Tata Group which was founded by Jamshedji Tata in the year 1868.

Some of the world’s most iconic brands, including Jaguar Land Rover in the UK and Tata Daewoo in South Korea are a part of the automotive operations of the group.

Tata Motors is committed to developing innovative and sustainable vehicles for the future of mobility. The company operates on a philosophy of ‘giving back to society’.

Additionally, in a major push for clean transportation, Tata Motors signed a deal to supply 3,500 EVs to BluSmart Mobility, India’s first electric and shared smart mobility company, expanding Delhi NCR electric fleet and offering customers more environment-friendly travel options. 

Tata Tiago EV

The history of Tata Motors dates back to 1945. Tata Motors was founded as Tata Engineering and Locomotive Company (TELCO), which initially focused on locomotives.

The company entered the commercial world market in the year 1954 through a joint venture with Daimler-Benz, establishing India’s first heavy vehicle manufacturing facility. Gradually it expanded the commercial vehicle portfolio with trucks and buses, becoming a dominant player in the market.

2008 marked a turning point with the acquisition of Jaguar and Land Rover from Ford, propelling Tata Motors onto a global stage.

Did You Know?

In the year 1991, India’s first sports utility vehicle (SUV), Tata Sierra, was designed and manufactured by Tata Motors.

Highlights (FY 2022-23)

  • Presence in more than 125 countries.
  • INR 20,265 crore was spent on research and development.
  • 25 manufacturing facilities.
  • 81,811 collective workforces.
  • 3,72,217 units of Jaguar and Land Rover (JLR) sold.

Subsidiaries

Some of the subsidiaries of Tata Motors is mentioned below:

  • Tata Motors Passenger Vehicles Limited

TMPV is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tata Motors and leads the passenger vehicle business in India. The company offers a diverse range of sedans, SUVs, and electric vehicles.

  • Tata Passenger Electric Mobility Limited (TPEM)

TPEM was established in FY 2021-22 to carry out the Passenger Electric Mobility Business with a funding of INR 7500 crore from TPG Rise. The company aims to channel future investments into electric vehicles.

  • Jaguar Land Rover (JLR)

JLR, a well-known British manufacturer of luxury cars, was acquired by Tata Motors in 2008. The company exemplifies quality and sustainability.

  • Tata Motors Finance Limited (TMFL)

TMFL and Tata Motors Finance Solutions Limited (TMFSL) are TMF Holdings Limited (TMFHL)’s Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) subsidiaries. TMFHL is a Core Investment Company (CIC) and Tata Motors’ completely owned subsidiary. TMFL provides vehicle financing solutions to Tata Motors customers in India.

Subsidiary List of tata motors

Business Model

Tata Motors holds 10 manufacturing facilities, and 3 R&D/engineering and design centres. Furthermore, there are 12 worldwide manufacturing and engineering facilities for JLR.

The company aims to become the most aspirational brand in the Indian Automotive Industry.

Full range of activities that TML provides includes manufacturing operations, logistics, financial services, global sales network, customer service network, mobility service, innovation and technology, design and engineering, and strategic sourcing.

Tata Sedan

Product Portfolio

The existing Commercial Vehicle Range of the company is as follows

MHCV, Buses and Vans, ILCV, SCV and PICKUP.

Last but not least the showstopper in the CV range is the ACE EV which features TML’s EVOGEN powertrain.

The existing Passenger Vehicle Range includes products like Tiago, Tigor, Altroz, Punch, Nexon, Harrier, and Safari.

Existing Electric Vehicle Range includes Tiago EV, Tigor EV, XPRES-T EV, Nexon EV, and NEXON EV MAX.

Also, the company boasts that the EV contribution is likely to increase to 25% in 5 years and reach 50% by 2030.

Apart from the portfolio mentioned above, TML offers a luxury range as well which includes Jaguar and Land Rover, the two distinct British brands with a rich heritage design.

Did you Know?

Tata Motors’ first indigenously developed passenger car, Tata Indica was presented in 1998 at the Geneva Motor Show.

Financial Statement Analysis

Key metrics.

Metrics of of tata motors

Key Margins

margins of tata motors

Peer Comparison

Market details of tata motors, swot analysis.

tata motors supply chain management case study

  • The company offers a diverse range of product portfolios including iconic brands like JLR which cater to the needs of a wide range of customers.
  • Consistent investments in strategic partnerships and collaborations to infuse new technologies help the company expand its business operations.
  • The company considers the quality and safety of the customers as key parameters while manufacturing products.
  • Tata Motors invests heavily in research and development and tries to curate future-ready vehicles with features like electric mobility and connectivity.
  • They actively promote sustainable practices through electric vehicles and emission reduction initiatives aligning with environmental concerns.
  • A significant portion of its revenue comes from India , which exposes the company to economic fluctuations and regulatory changes in the country.
  • Despite the pervasiveness of JLR, their presence in major global markets like China and North America remains limited.
  • Dependence on imported materials exposes the company to price fluctuations , impacting the profit margins.
  • The EV industry is dynamic as it changes quickly, failure to keep up with market trends may affect margins. 

Opportunities

  • Tata Motors is well-positioned to capitalise on the rising demand for electric vehicles with their existing offerings and future developments.
  • Consistent investments in research and development can lead to breakthroughs in areas like autonomous driving and connected cars, offering a competitive advantage.
  • Government initiatives promoting EVs can create favourable market conditions for Tata Motors.
  • They can leverage JLR to further expand their reach in international markets.
  • Any kind of disruption in the supply chain can affect business operations.
  • The company is exposed to several global economic and geopolitical situations such as wars, natural disasters, and pandemics.
  • Sudden shifts in policy and environmental regulations can disrupt operations.
  • Rapid advancements in technology can make existing products obsolete if they are not constantly updated.
  • Brand positioning is a challenge in a dynamic automotive market with more intense competition from existing OEMs and new entrants in the market.

Tata Motors has indeed seen incredible growth in the Indian domestic market, especially in the commercial vehicle segment. Rising GDP and infrastructure spending can further boost the demand for commercial vehicles. New models such as Tiago, Nexon, and Harrier have been well-received by customers. Additionally, the company has captured the growing market segments with the latest designed EVs.

Tata Motors stands as a prominent player in the Indian automotive landscape, with a diversified product portfolio, strong brand recognition and a commitment to innovation and sustainability. Their business model positions them well for future growth. However, navigating and addressing key challenges will be critical for the company.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. Why is electric mobility a big focus for TML?

Ans. With India’s growing environmental concerns and rising fuel costs, electric vehicles represent a good solution.

2. Can Tata Motors become a global leader in the automotive industry?

Ans. The question cannot be answered yet but capitalising on opportunities will be important for them to compete on a global scale.

3. What are the latest innovations of the company?

Ans. TML is investing in connected car technology, autonomous driving, and many other revolutionary innovations.

4. Which company made the world’s cheapest car?

Ans. The iconic Tata Nano was the cheapest car ever sold and was produced with the objective of providing affordable mobility to people.

5. Does the company focus majorly on budget cars?

Ans. Tata Motors fulfil the diverse needs of customers by offering premium vehicles like Land Rover Discovery and budget friendly cars like Tata Punch. 

Disclaimer: The securities, funds, and strategies mentioned in this blog are purely for informational purposes and are not recommendations.

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Operations Management Case Studies | Case Study in Management, Operations, Strategies, Marketing Management, Case Studies

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Tata Motors has realised operational excellence will continue to be the critical determinant of success in the years to come. This case deals with the strategy adopted by Tata Motors for its turnaround and operational excellence.

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Tata Motors, Tata Engineering and Locomotive Co Ltd (TELCO), Operations management, Tata Group, Supply chain management, Cost reduction, Tata Indica, Tata Indigo, Vendor management, Six Sigma quality, Tata business excellence model

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Tata Motors: Understanding risks in the supply chain

Automobile manufacturing has a complex value chain and requires a wide range of manmade materials which include highly refined composite materials and natural resources, such as water and sand, fossil fuels and grid power.

Tata Motors Limited (TML) conducted a natural capital assessment to identify key impacts and dependencies in our manufacturing operations. We sought to value and quantify associated environmental externalities. We wanted to better understand the embedded risks in our supply chain to be able to tackle them accordingly.

We identified water and silica sand as critical dependencies for closer evaluation because our plants include water intensive operations such as heat treatment, painting and machine shops. Silica sand is used in the manufacturing of ferrous and aluminum castings. 

  • Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services
  • Climate & Air Emissions
  • Materials & Resources
  • Waste Management
  • Quantitative
  • Value to society
  • Direct operations

Key findings

We conducted our natural capital valuation using a value transfer method based on global and national environmental studies. Our analysis found that GHG emissions from manufacturing operations was, by far, the most significant impact driver, followed by non-hazardous waste disposal to landfill and use of fresh water. The exercise helped us to recognize embedded environmental and societal costs in our manufacturing process. Understanding water and silica sand as key dependencies will help us to de-risk our operations.

Going forward, TML intends to carry out natural capital assessments for other manufacturing sites in India. Our ongoing Sustainable Supply Chain initiative will complement this. We expect that the outcomes of these initiatives will provide insights to determine a way forward, inform our manufacturing strategy and outline ways to minimize the environmental impacts in our value chain.

More information

Tata Motors Sustainability Report 2016-17   http://corp-content.tatamotors.com.s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/15092832/tml-sustainability-report-2016-2017.pdf

Arvind Bodhankar ( [email protected] )

Peter Dsouza ( [email protected] )

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Internationalization of Tata Motors: Strategic Analysis Using Flowing Stream Strategy Process

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  • Published: 03 January 2020
  • Volume 14 , pages 54–70, ( 2019 )

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tata motors supply chain management case study

  • Sushil   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-3118-5461 1 &
  • Shamita Garg   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0001-8952-0309 1  

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In the past few years, Tata Motors succeeded by exploiting international opportunities. Its percentage of revenue from international operations has increased from 9% in 2016 to 79.80% in 2018. Hence its strategy is worthy of study. ‘Flexible Strategy Framework’ is used to analyse the strategy of Tata Motors which evolved to gain its international presence in the automotive manufacturing industry. This framework is an attempt to manage change, along with the consideration of continuity forces in the organization. The ability of the firm to integrate continuity and change forces effectively has made the firm competitive in the international market. The organization is continually doing innovations to keep itself ahead of the competition. This study is a novel attempt to explore linkages between internationalization and competitiveness using the framework of flowing stream strategy.

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Internationalisation Process of Indian Auto Giants

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Strategic Options for Automobile OEMs of Indian Origin to have Sustained Competitive Advantage: A Case of Tata Motors

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Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge all those who have contributed in improving the quality of the paper, including the anonymous reviewers and editors. The authors acknowledge the value-addition by the Editor-in-Chief.

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See Figs.  10 and 11 .

figure 10

(source: developed based on data collected from annual reports of Tata Motors)

Percentage of revenue from (international operations)

figure 11

Continuity and change forces

Appendix B: Continuity and Change Forces for Tata Motors Over Time

See Figs.  12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 and 17 .

figure 12

(source: developed based on data searched on ACE equity)

Revenue from net sales (in Rs crores)

figure 13

source: developed based on data searched on ACE equity)

Expenditure (in Rs crores) (

figure 14

Profit and loss incurred (in Rs crores)

figure 15

source: developed based on data searched on SIAM)

Number of vehicles (export)

figure 16

(source: developed based on data searched on SIAM)

Growth in commercial vehicles

figure 17

Growth in passenger vehicles (

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Sushil, Garg, S. Internationalization of Tata Motors: Strategic Analysis Using Flowing Stream Strategy Process. JGBC 14 , 54–70 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42943-019-00006-z

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Issue Date : December 2019

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s42943-019-00006-z

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    In the past few years, Tata Motors succeeded by exploiting international opportunities. Its percentage of revenue from international operations has increased from 9% in 2016 to 79.80% in 2018. Hence its strategy is worthy of study. 'Flexible Strategy Framework' is used to analyse the strategy of Tata Motors which evolved to gain its international presence in the automotive manufacturing ...

  18. Operation and supply chain management on Tata Motors

    The concept of supply chain applies to the internal relationship between processes as well as the outside relationship between operations. Overall it is a management of activities and relationship which intends to achieve maximum customer value and sustainable competitive advantage. (Cowe, 2008). First-tier supplier.

  19. PDF Case Study of tata motors: Swot analysis & strategy suggestions

    CASE STUDY: TATA MOTORS negatively or positively for Tata depending on where the price is today, but since India's economic struggles is putting a damper on the automotive industry, then this would be a negative outcome for Tata. 1.2 Consumers spending less: Another external factor that the car manufacturing company has been facing is global per

  20. PDF Supplier Quality Management Case Study Tata Motors Ltd. (An Automotive

    Supplier Quality Management Case Study - Tata Motors Ltd. (An Automotive OEM in India) ... In this phase, TML ensures that suppliers form integral part of supply chain for the OEM, and,

  21. Customer Satisfaction on Supply Chain Management Practices: A Study of

    The objective of the current study was to find out the level of customer satisfaction on supply chain management practices of Toyota and Tata motors in KSA. A total of 250 randomly drawn respondents were taken for the survey using questionnaire method.

  22. PDF Risk management Navigating headwinds with confidence

    supply constraints of semi-conductors has impacted the automotive sector globally and we are also witnessing certain disruptions. We operate an effective supply chain risk management framework which enables proactive engagement with our suppliers to diagnose and mitigating potential disruptions. We work closely with our suppliers to define ...

  23. Tata Motors confident of sustaining growth amid supply chain concerns

    Tata Motors confident of sustaining growth amid supply chain concerns Updated - February 22, 2021 10:51 pm IST Published - February 22, 2021 10:32 pm IST - NEW DELHI