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MLA Works Cited Page: Periodicals

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MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook (8 th ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page.

Periodicals include magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. Works cited entries for periodical sources include three main elements—the author of the article, the title of the article, and information about the magazine, newspaper, or journal. MLA uses the generic term “container” to refer to any print or digital venue (a website or print journal, for example) in which an essay or article may be included.

Below is the generic citation for periodicals using the MLA style. Use this as guidance if you are trying to cite a type of source not described on this page, omitting any information that does not apply:

Author. Title. Title of container (self contained if book), Other contributors (translators or editors), Version (edition), Number (vol. and/or no.), Publisher, Publisher Date, Location (pp.). 2nd container’s title, Other contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Pub date, Location (pp.).

Article in a Magazine

Cite by listing the article's author, putting the title of the article in quotations marks, and italicizing the periodical title. Follow with the date of publication. Remember to abbreviate the month. The basic format is as follows:

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Periodical , Day Month Year, pages.

Poniewozik, James. "TV Makes a Too-Close Call." Time, 20 Nov. 2000, pp. 70-71.

Buchman, Dana. "A Special Education." Good Housekeeping, Mar. 2006, pp. 143-48.

Article in a Newspaper

Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article, but note the different pagination in most newspapers. If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition after the newspaper title.

Brubaker, Bill. "New Health Center Targets County's Uninsured Patients." Washington Post, 24 May 2007, p. LZ01.

Krugman, Andrew. "Fear of Eating." New York Times, late ed.,  21 May 2007, p. A1.

If the newspaper is a less well-known or local publication, include the city name in brackets after the title of the newspaper.

Behre, Robert. "Presidential Hopefuls Get Final Crack at Core of S.C. Democrats." Post and Courier [Charleston, SC],29 Apr. 2007, p. A11.

Trembacki, Paul. "Brees Hopes to Win Heisman for Team." Purdue Exponent [West Lafayette, IN], 5 Dec. 2000, p. 20.

To cite a review, include the title of the review (if available), then the phrase, “Review of” and provide the title of the work (in italics for books, plays, and films; in quotation marks for articles, poems, and short stories). Finally, provide performance and/or publication information.

Review Author. "Title of Review (if there is one)." Review of Performance Title, by Author/Director/Artist. Title of Periodical, Day Month Year, page.

Seitz, Matt Zoller. "Life in the Sprawling Suburbs, If You Can Really Call It Living." Review of Radiant City , directed by Gary Burns and Jim Brown. New York Times, 30 May 2007, p. E1.

Weiller, K. H. Review of Sport, Rhetoric, and Gender: Historical Perspectives and Media Representations , edited by Linda K. Fuller. Choice, Apr. 2007, p. 1377.

An Editorial & Letter to the Editor

Cite as you would any article in a periodical, but include the designators "Editorial" or "Letter" to identify the type of work it is.

"Of Mines and Men." Editorial. Wall Street Journal, eastern edition, 24 Oct. 2003, p. A14.

Hamer, John. Letter. American Journalism Review, Dec. 2006/Jan. 2007, p. 7.

Anonymous Articles

Cite the article’s title first, then finish the citation as you would any other for that kind of periodical.

"Business: Global Warming's Boom Town; Tourism in Greenland." The Economist , 26 May 2007, p. 82.

"Aging; Women Expect to Care for Aging Parents but Seldom Prepare." Women's Health Weekly, 10 May 2007, p. 18.

An Article in a Scholarly Journal

A scholarly journal can be thought of as a container, as are collections of short stories or poems, a television series, or even a website. A container can be thought of as anything that contains other pieces of work. In this case, cite the author and title of article as you normally would. Then, put the title of the journal in italics. Include the volume number (“vol.”) and issue number (“no.”) when possible, separated by commas. Finally, add the year and page numbers.

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal , Volume, Issue, Year, pages.

Bagchi, Alaknanda. "Conflicting Nationalisms: The Voice of the Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi's Bashai Tudu ." Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, vol. 15, no. 1, 1996, pp. 41-50.

Duvall, John N. "The (Super)Marketplace of Images: Television as Unmediated Mediation in DeLillo's White Noise ." Arizona Quarterly , vol. 50, no. 3, 1994, pp. 127-53.

An Article in a Special Issue of a Scholarly Journal

When an article appears in a special issue of a journal, cite the name of the special issue in the entry’s title space, in italics. Add the descriptor “special issue of” and include the name of the journal, also in italics, followed by the rest of the information required for a standard scholarly journal citation.

Web entries should follow a similar format, and should include a DOI (if available), otherwise include a URL or permalink.

Burgess, Anthony. "Politics in the Novels of Graham Greene." Literature and Society, special issue of Journal of Contemporary History, vol. 2, no. 2, 1967, pp. 93-99.

Case, Sue-Ellen. “Eve's Apple, or Women's Narrative Bytes.” Technocriticism and Hypernarrative, special issue of Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 43, no. 3, 1997, pp. 631-50. Project Muse , doi:10.1353/mfs.1997.0056.

APA Citation Style, 7th edition: Newspaper Article

  • General Style Guidelines
  • One Author or Editor
  • Two Authors or Editors
  • Three to Five Authors or Editors
  • Article or Chapter in an Edited Book
  • Article in a Reference Book
  • Edition other than the First
  • Translation
  • Government Publication
  • Journal Article with 1 Author
  • Journal Article with 2 Authors
  • Journal Article with 3–20 Authors
  • Journal Article 21 or more Authors
  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • Basic Web Page
  • Web page from a University site
  • Web Page with No Author
  • Entry in a Reference Work
  • Government Document
  • Film and Television
  • Youtube Video
  • Audio Podcast
  • Electronic Image
  • Twitter/Instagram
  • Lecture/PPT
  • Conferences
  • Secondary Sources
  • Citation Support
  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Formatting Your Paper

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

What is a DOI? A DOI ( digital object identifier ) is a unique alphanumeric string assigned by a registration agency (the International DOI Foundation) to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the internet. 

NOTE: It is regarded as the most important part of the citation because it will accurately direct users to the specific article.

Think of it as a "digital fingerprint" or an article's DNA!

The rules for DOIs have been updated in the 7th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. They should be included as URLs, rather than just the alphanumeric string.

Correct:  

  • http://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-12-114
  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-12-114

Incorrect:     

  • doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-12-114
  • Retrieved from http://doi:10.1186/1471-2288-12-114
  • FREE DOI Look-up (Cross-Ref)
  • DOI System: FAQ
  • Looking up a DOI
  • DOI Flowchart

Newspaper Article (pp. 200-201)

General Format

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): 

(Author Surname, Year)

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Author Surname, Year, page number)

References:

Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year, Month Day). Article title: Subtitle. Newspaper Title, page range. URL [if viewed online]

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase):

(Wallace, 2007)

(Wallace, 2007, p. A8)

Wallace, K. (2007, December 4). Passport applicant finds massive privacy breach. The Globe and Mail , pp. A1, A8.

(Severson & Martin, 2009)

In-Text Citation (Quotation:

Severson, K. &, Martin, A. (2009, March 3). It's organic, but does that mean it's safer? The New York Times . http://www.nytimes.com

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APA Style: Basics

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Newspaper Articles

NOTE: Don't forget to indent the second and subsequent lines. 

Newspaper Article – Print or From a Database

Use this format to cite a newspaper article you found the article in print form or from a database like News & Newspapers - ProQuest.

General Format

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper , Section.

For Example

Brody, L. (2020, January 13). Cherry blossoms can't wait for spring. Wall Street Journal , A.10B.

Corresponding In-Text Citation

(Brody, 2020)

Brody (2020)

Newspaper Article – From Publisher’s Website

Use this format to cite an article you found on a newspaper's website like the New York Times website or the Boston Globe website.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper . URL

Houghton, K. (2020, January 16). Communities struggle as recycling costs soar to nearly twice that of trash disposal. New Hampshire Union Leader . https://www.unionleader.com/news/environment/communities-struggle-as-recycling-costs-soar-to-nearly-twice-that/article_3116f606-a0ae-52f8-a9da-61d247f7fbde.html

(Houghton, 2020)

Houghton (2020)

Newspaper Article – From the Web

An article from an online news site (like CNN, Fox News, HuffPost, and BBC), is considered a webpage on a website.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of work , Site Name. URL

Andrew, S. (2020, January 16). An orphaned teen is being forced out of his grandparents' senior community because he's too young . CNN. https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/16/us/orphan-teen-kicked-out-grandparents-hoa-trnd/index.html

(Andrew, 2020)

Andrew (2020)

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Citation Styles: A Brief Guide to APA, MLA and Turabian

  • Newspaper Articles
  • Journal Articles
  • Magazine Articles

Citing Newspaper Articles

  • Government Publications
  • Other Materials
  • In Text Citations
  • Sample Bibliography: APA
  • Sample Bibliography: MLA
  • Sample Bibliography: Turabian
  • Creating an Annotated Bibliography This link opens in a new window

The basic format for a book citation requires listing the author's name, the title of the book, the publisher's name, and the date of publication. Edited books, when cited in full, will list the editor's name instead of an author’s name. 

NEWSPAPERS The basic format for a newspaper article includes the author’s name (if available), the headline, the name of the newspaper, the date of the issue, and the section and page numbers where the article is located. Turabian recommends citing newspaper articles only in the notes unless the article is critical to an argument or is frequently cited. The following bibliography entries assume that the sample articles are critical. Turabian also recommends against citing page numbers since newspapers are often issued in multiple editions and page numbering may vary from one edition to another.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE – NO AUTHOR LISTED The example is based on an article published in the Block and Tackle Times, on October 31, 1995, in Section A, on pages 1 and 5. The article was entitled “Congress Votes to Cut Subsidies to Earthworm Ranchers: Sport Fishermen Squirm Over the Loss of Cheap Worms.” No author was listed for the article.

Congress votes to cut subsidies to earthworm ranchers: Sport fishermen squirm over the loss of cheap worms. (1995, October 31). The Block and Tackle Times , A1, A5.

“Congress Votes to Cut Subsidies to Earthworm Ranchers: Sport Fishermen Squirm Over the Loss of Cheap Worms.” The Block and Tackle Times,  31 Oct. 1995, p. A1, A5.

“Congress Votes to Cut Subsidies to Earthworm Ranchers: Sport Fishermen Squirm Over the Loss of Cheap Worms.” The Block and Tackle Times , October 31, 1995.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE – AUTHOR LISTED The example is based on an article by author Alvie Singer, entitled “Let Freedom Ring,” that was published in the Sioux Falls Trumpet, January 1, 2001, on page A12.

Singer, A. (2001, January 1). Let freedom ring. Sioux Falls Trumpet , A12.

Singer, Alvie. “Let Freedom Ring.” Sioux Falls Trumpet,  1 Jan. 2001, p. A12.

Singer, Alvie. “Let Freedom Ring.” Sioux Falls Trumpet , January 1, 2001.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE FROM ONLINE FULL-TEXT DATABASE The example is based on an article written by author Annie Hall for the newspaper Split Cities Tattler on September 30, 2001. The article appeared in Section A of the newspaper on page 1 and carried the headline “Psychiatrist Blames Neurotic Behaviors on News Media.” The full text of the article was pulled from the subscription database AlltheNews Online on September 30, 2002.

Hall, A. (2001, September 30). Psychiatrist blames neurotic behaviors on news media. Split Cities Tattler , A1.

Hall, Annie. “Psychiatrist Blames Neurotic Behaviors on News Media.” Split Cities Tattler, 30 Sept. 2001, p. A1. AlltheNews Online, www.allthenewsonline.com/SCT/093001_psychiatrist.html.  Accessed 30 Sept. 2002.

Hall, Annie. “Psychiatrist Blames Neurotic Behaviors on News Media.” Split Cities Tattler , September 30, 2001. http://www.allthenewsonline.com/SCT/093001_psychiatrist.html (accessed September 30, 2002).

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE FROM AN ONLINE VERSION OF A NEWSPAPER The example is based on an article written by author Blackie Dahlia for the newspaper Crying Out Loud. The article, which appeared as an extra feature in the online version of the newspaper and was not in the print version, was entitled “Aspiring Actresses Warned of the Dangers of Hollywood Nightlife.” The article was published online on September 12, 2008, and was retrieved on the same day.

Dahlia, B. (2008, September 12). Aspiring actresses warned of the dangers of Hollywood nightlife. Crying Out Loud . http://www.cryingoutloud.com

Dahlia, Blackie. “Aspiring Actresses Warned of the Dangers of Hollywood Nightlife.” Crying Out Loud,  12 Sept. 2008. www.cryingoutloud.com/20080912/dahlia.html.  Accessed 12 Sept. 2008.

Dahlia, Blackie. “Aspiring Actresses Warned of the Dangers of Hollywood Nightlife.” Crying Out Loud , September 12, 2008. http://www.cryingoutloud.com/20080912/dahlia.html (accessed September 12, 2008).

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APA Citation Guide (7th Edition): Newspaper Articles

  • Journal Articles
  • Books, eBooks & Pamphlets
  • Class Notes, Lectures, and Presentations
  • Government Documents
  • Codes of Ethics (Online)
  • Images, Charts, Graphs, Maps & Tables
  • Newspaper Articles
  • Magazine Articles
  • Personal Communication (Interviews, Emails)
  • Social Media
  • Videos & DVDs
  • Encyclopedias & Dictionaries (Reference Works)
  • When Information Is Missing
  • When Creating Digital Assignments
  • Works Quoted in Another Source
  • Paraphrasing
  • Informal Citations
  • Citation Tools
  • Reference List & Paper Formatting
  • Annotated Bibliography

Information you need for a citation

If an item has no author, start the citation with the article title.

If, and only if, the article is signed "Anonymous", put the word Anonymous where you would normally place the author's name.

Italicize titles of journals, magazines and newspapers. Do not italicize the titles of articles.

Capitalize only the first letter of the first word of the article title. If there is a colon in the article title, also capitalize the first letter of the first word after the colon.

If an item has no date, use the short form n.d. where you would normally put the date.

Retrieval Dates

Most articles will not need these in the citation. Only use them for online articles from places where content may change often, like a free website or a wiki.

Page Numbers

If an article has no page numbers provided, leave that part of the citation out in the References List.

If an article doesn't appear on continuous pages, list all the page numbers the article is on, separated by commas. For example (4, 6, 12-14)

For newspaper articles, put p. before the page number if the article is one page long and pp. if it is more than one page

Note : All citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent in a Reference List.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Newspaper Article From a Library Database

Author's Last Name, First Initial. Second Initial if Given. (Year of Publication, Month Day if Given). Title of article: Subtitle if any. Name of Newspaper , p. SectionPage if given. Retrieved from Database Name database.

Newspaper Article with an Unknown Author

Title of article: Subtitle if any. (Year of Publication, Month Day if Given). Name of Newspaper , p. SectionPage.

Note : If instead of having no author, the article is signed as being written by "Anonymous", put the name "Anonymous" where you'd normally put the author's name. Only use the word Anonymous if the article is specifically credited that way.

Newspaper Article From a Website

Author's Last Name, First Initial. Second Initial if Given. (Year of Publication, Month Day if Given). Title of article: Subtitle if any. Name of Newspaper . Retrieved from URL

Note : If the the article is on more than one page use the letters "pp." before the page numbers instead of "p.". If the article is on continuous pages put a dash (-) between the first and last page numbers. If the article appears on discontinuous page numbers, give all page numbers separated with commas between them.

Newspaper Article In Print

Author's Last Name, First Initial. Second Initial if Given. (Year of Publication, Month Day if Given). Title of article: Subtitle if any. Name of Newspaper , p. SectionPage.

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MLA Style (9th Edition) Citation Guide: Magazine/Newspaper Articles

  • Introduction to MLA Style
  • Journal Articles
  • Magazine/Newspaper Articles
  • Books & Ebooks
  • Government & Legal Documents
  • Biblical Sources
  • Secondary Sources
  • Videos/DVDs/TV Shows
  • How to Cite: Other
  • 9th Edition Updates
  • Additional Help

Table of Contents

A note on magazine/newspaper citations, magazine/newspaper article from a website, magazine/newspaper article from nexis uni, magazine/newspaper article in print, how do i know if it's a newspaper.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from  journals  or magazines.

Note: For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

If there is no known author, start the citation with the title of the article instead.

Access Date

Date of access is optional in MLA 8th/9th edition; it is recommended for pages that may change frequently or that do not have a copyright/publication date.

In your works cited list, abbreviate months as follows: 

January = Jan. February = Feb. March = Mar. April = Apr. May = May June = June July = July August = Aug. September = Sept. October = Oct. November = Nov. December = Dec.

Spell out months fully in the body of your paper. 

Online newspapers and magazines sometimes include a “permalink,” which is a shortened, stable version of a URL. Look for a “share” or “cite this” button to see if a source includes a permalink. If you can find a permalink, use that instead of a URL.

Here are some common features you should try to find before citing electronic sources in MLA style. Not every Web page will provide all of the following information. However, collect as much of the following information as possible both for your citations and for your research notes:

  • Author and/or editor names (if available); last names first.
  • "Article name in quotation marks."
  • Title of the website, project, or book in italics.
  • Any version numbers available, including editions (ed.), revisions, posting dates, volumes (vol.), or issue numbers (no.).
  • Publisher information, including the publisher name and publishing date.
  • Take note of any page numbers (p. or pp.) or paragraph numbers (par. or pars.).
  • “permalink,” which is a shortened, stable version of a URL. Look for a “share” or “cite this” button to see if a source includes a permalink. If you can find a permalink, use that instead of a URL.
  • Date you accessed the material (Date Accessed)—While not required, it is highly recommended, especially when dealing with pages that change frequently or do not have a visible copyright date.
  • Remember to cite containers after your regular citation. Examples of containers are collections of short stories or poems, a television series, or even a website. A container is anything that is a part of a larger body of works.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any."  Title of Website , Date of Publication, URL. Access date.

Note:  If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article.

Date of access is now optional in MLA 8th edition. If no publication date is included, we recommend including the date you last accessed the site.

Works Cited List Example:

Zimmerman, Eilene. "The Many Delicate Issues of Spirituality in the Office." New York Times , 15 Aug. 2004, www.nytimes.com/2004/08/15/jobs/the-many-delicate-issues-of-spirituality-in-the-office.html.  Accessed 7 June 2016.

Note : This entry has no page numbers, so this information is left out of the citation.

In-Text Citation Example:

(Author's Last Name)

(Zimmerman)

Note: This entry has no page numbers, so this information is left out of the citation.

Note : If there is no author listed, the in-text citation would include the first word or words of the title of the article in quotation marks.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any."  Title of Newspaper , Date of Publication, p. Page Number. Database Name , URL. 

Note:  If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article. Date of access is now optional in MLA 8th edition.

Ruhe, Pierre. “Pair of Recitals Show Musicians’ Contrasting Styles.” The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, 5 Feb. 2001, p. 5D. Nexis Uni, advance.lexis.com/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:4292-6G90-0026-G40Y-00000-00&context=1516831.

(Author's Last Name Page Number)

(Ruhe 5D)

Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article, but note the different pagination in most newspapers. If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition after the newspaper title.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any."  Name of Newspaper , Date of Publication, p. Page number. 

Note:  If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article.

Kershner, Isabel. "Ancient Grocery Lists May Shed Light on When the Bible Was First Written." New York Times , 2016 April 12, p. A8.

(Author's Last Name Page Number)

(Kershner A8)

Note : If an article is only one page long, you do not need to provide the page number in the in-text citation. 

Note : If there is no author listed, the in-text citation would include the first word or words of the title of the article in quotation marks, e.g. ("Talks").

If the newspaper is a less well-known or local publication, include the city name in brackets after the title of the newspaper.

Behre, Robert. "Presidential Hopefuls Get Final Crack at Core of S.C. Democrats."  Post and Courier  [Charleston, SC], 29 Apr. 2007, p. A11.

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How To - Use the APA Style Guide

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  • Book Reference Examples
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7th ed Newspaper Article Examples

Newspaper articles.

NOTE: Don't forget to indent the second and subsequent lines. 

Newspaper Article – Print or From a Database

Use this format to cite a newspaper article you found the article in print form or from a database like News & Newspapers - ProQuest.

General Format

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper , Section.

For Example

Brody, L. (2020, January 13). Cherry blossoms can't wait for spring. Wall Street Journal , A.10B.

Corresponding In-Text Citation

(Brody, 2020)

Brody (2020)

Newspaper Article – From Publisher’s Website

Use this format to cite an article you found on a newspaper's website like the New York Times website or the Boston Globe website.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper . URL

Houghton, K. (2020, January 16). Communities struggle as recycling costs soar to nearly twice that of trash disposal. New Hampshire Union Leader . https://www.unionleader.com/news/environment/communities-struggle-as-recycling-costs-soar-to-nearly-twice-that/article_3116f606-a0ae-52f8-a9da-61d247f7fbde.html

(Houghton, 2020)

Houghton (2020)

Newspaper Article – From the Web

An article from an online news site (like CNN, Fox News, HuffPost, and BBC), is considered a webpage on a website.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of work , Site Name. URL

Andrew, S. (2020, January 16). An orphaned teen is being forced out of his grandparents' senior community because he's too young . CNN. https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/16/us/orphan-teen-kicked-out-grandparents-hoa-trnd/index.html

(Andrew, 2020)

Andrew (2020)

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How to Cite a Newspaper Article in APA

Citation information, apa full citation preview, a better way to work.

Feel confident you've done your best work with the help of Grammarly. Benefit from:

Generative AI assistance

Automatically created citations

Tone and clarity suggestions

Full Citation Rules

In-text citation rules, how to cite (practically) anything in apa.

  • Cite anything in APA
  • Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA
  • Cite a Newspaper Article in Chicago
  • Cite an Anonymous Interview in APA
  • Cite a Cartoon in APA
  • Cite an Editorial in APA
  • Cite an Interview in APA
  • Cite a Newspaper in APA
  • Cite a Performance Review in APA
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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / MLA Format / How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA

How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA

Newspaper – A daily or weekly publication that contains news, often featuring articles on political events, crime, business, art, entertainment, society, and sports.

Some examples of popular newspapers include The New York Times , Wall Street Journal , USA Today , and The Chicago Tribune .

How to cite a newspaper in print

View Screenshot | Cite your source

When citing a newspaper in print

  • The city name is in the name of the newspaper.
  • It is a national or international newspaper.
  • Page numbers : One page number is “p. #” More than one page is “pp. ##-##.”

How to cite a newspaper article found online

Cite your source

When citing a newspaper found online

  • URL : Omit the https://.
  • Accessed date : Technically, the access date is supplemental and does not always need to be included. However, due to the easily changeable nature of online information, many teachers prefer to include it in the citation.

How to cite a newspaper article found on a database

When citing a newspaper article found on a database

  • Accessed date : Technically, the access date is supplemental. However, some teachers will request to have it included.

Published October 31, 2011. Updated May 18, 2021.

MLA Formatting Guide

MLA Formatting

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  • View MLA Guide

Citation Examples

  • Book Chapter
  • Journal Article
  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • Website (no author)
  • View all MLA Examples

newspaper article citation example

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To cite an online newspaper article in MLA style, you need to have basic information including the author, publication date, title of the article, newspaper name, and the URL. The templates for in-text citations and works-cited-list entries of an online newspaper article, along with examples, are given below for one author:

In-text citation template and example:

For citations in prose, use the first name and surname of the author in the first occurrence. In subsequent citations, use only the surname. In parenthetical citations, always use only the surname of the author.

Citation in prose:

First mention: Jane Brody . . .

Subsequent occurrences: Brody . . .

Parenthetical:

. . . (Brody)

Works-cited-list entry template and example:

The title of the article is in plain text and title case; it is placed inside quotation marks. The newspaper name is given in italics. Follow the format given in the template and example for writing the date, month, and year.

Surname, First Name. “Title of the Article.” Title of the Newspaper , Publication date, URL.

Reuters. “Wildfire in Southern Spain Forces 500 to Flee.” The Times of India , 9 Sept. 2021, www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/europe/wildfire-in-southern-spain-forces-500-to-flee/articleshow/86063279.cms .

To cite an article from the New York Times in MLA style, you need to have basic information including the author, publication date, title of the article, and the URL. The templates for in-text citation and works-cited-list entry of an article from the New York Times, along with examples, are given below for one author:

The title of the article is in plain text and title case; it is placed inside quotation marks. The newspaper name, “ The New York Times ,” is given in italics. Follow the format given in the template and example for writing the date, month, and year.

Surname, First Name. “Title of the Article.” The New York Times , Publication date, URL.

Brody, Jane. “How Vision Loss Can Affect the Brain.” The New York Times , 10 Sept. 2021, www.nytimes.com/2021/09/06/well/live/vision-loss-brain-health.html .

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MLA Citation Guide (MLA 9th Edition): Newspaper Articles

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What if an author is not listed?

Begin the newspaper article citation with the title of the article if the author's name is not listed. For the in-text citation, list the first word or first few words of the title (excluding a, an, the).

Newspaper Article in Print

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper, Date of Publication, p. Page number. 

Cook, Lorne. "EU Warns 3 Nations of Legal Action."  San Francisco Chronicle,  14 June 2017, p. A4+. 

Note:   If the article appears on non-consecutive pages (e.g., the article starts on page 4 then continues on page 12), write the first page number and a plus (+) sign. E.g., 4

Newspaper Article from a Website

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of New Publication , Date of Publication, URL.

Litz, Sarah. "All the Fires: What You Need to Know on Size, Containment."  Reno Gazette-Journal , 12 July 2017, www.rgj.com/story/news/2017/07/12/farad-fire-updates-size-containment-hills-burn-west-verdi/471293001/.

  Note: This entry has no page numbers, so this information is left out of the citation.

Newspaper Article from a Library Database

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [city of newspaper if city name not in name], Date of Publication, p. Page number if given. Name of Database, Permalink URL. 

Russolillo, Steven. "Why the Housing Market is Getting Stronger: New-home Sales and Quarterly Results from Toll Brothers this Week Should Bolster the Housing Market's Solid Fundamentals."  Wall Street Journal , 22 May 2016.  ProQuest,  unr.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1790256212?accountid=452. 

 Note : If an article title ends with a question mark or exclamation mark, you do not need to add a period to the end of the title. 

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MLA Citation Guide (9th Edition): Newspaper Articles

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On This Page: Newspapers

Newspaper article from a library database, newspaper article from a library database - newspapers with volumes and issues, newspaper article from a website, newspaper article in print, citing two authors, citing three or more authors, abbreviating months.

In your works cited list, abbreviate months as follows: 

January = Jan. February = Feb. March = Mar. April = Apr. May = May June = June July = July August = Aug. September = Sept. October = Oct. November = Nov. December = Dec.

Spell out months fully in the body of your paper. 

How Can I Tell if it's a Newspaper?

Photo from Flickr, created by user NS Newsflash. Available under a Creative Commons license.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Articles are usually written by journalists who may or may not have subject expertise.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from journals or magazines .

Note : For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [city of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name], Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

 Note: If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [City of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name of newspaper], vol. Volume Number, no. Issues Number, Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Title of Website,  Date of Publication, URL. Accessed Day Month Year site was visited .

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper, Date of Publication, p. Page Number. 

If there are two authors, cite the the authors as follows (list authors in the order they are given on the page, not alphabetically):

Last Name, First Name of First Author, and First Name Last Name of Second Author.

Example: Smith, James, and Sarah Johnston.

If there are three or more authors, cite only the name of the first author listed with their Last Name, First Name Middle Name followed by a comma et al.

Example: Smith, James, et al.

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  • Citing a Newspaper Article in Chicago Style | Format & Examples

Citing a Newspaper Article in Chicago Style | Format & Examples

Published on May 10, 2021 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on December 5, 2022.

Chicago Reference Generator

In Chicago notes and bibliography style , it’s recommended to just cite newspaper articles in footnotes and omit them from the bibliography. Only list an article in the bibliography if it’s essential to your argument, if you cite it frequently, or if your university requires you to.

No page numbers are used in notes or bibliography entries for newspaper articles. Add a URL if you consulted the article online. Make sure to pay attention to the punctuation (e.g., commas and quotation marks ) in your notes and citations.

In author-date style , you should always include any newspaper articles you cite in your reference list.

Table of contents

Newspaper names and editions, citing a magazine article, citing articles in author-date style, frequently asked questions about chicago style citations.

When writing the name of a newspaper, use italics and omit any initial “The”:

  • The New York Times
  • New York Times

When a newspaper shares a name with other publications and could be confused with them, add the name of the city (or country, for a foreign national newspaper) where it is published. This appears in parentheses , in plain text, after the newspaper name.

  • Gazette (Montreal)
  • Times  (UK)

Different editions of a newspaper may exist (e.g. “early edition,” “final edition,” “Midwest edition”); they can be listed where relevant:

Lehmann-Haupt, Christopher. “Robert Giroux, Editor, Publisher and Nurturer of Literary Giants, Is Dead at 94.” New York Times , September 6, 2008, New York edition.

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

Magazine articles are cited in a very similar format to newspaper articles, but with a couple of key differences.

First, magazine articles must  appear in the bibliography.

Second, page numbers (when available) may be used in footnote citations of magazines. However, do not include a page range in the bibliography entry, since magazine articles are often interrupted by other material (e.g., advertisements).

In author-date style , your in-text citations consist of the author’s last name and the year of publication. A page number may be included for a magazine article.

In the corresponding reference list entry, the year appears twice: straight after the author’s name, and then again as part of the full date towards the end.

Author-date newspaper citation examples

  • Online newspaper article
  • Print article (specific edition)
  • Magazine article

In Chicago notes and bibliography style , the usual standard is to use a full note for the first citation of each source, and short notes for any subsequent citations of the same source.

However, your institution’s guidelines may differ from the standard rule. In some fields, you’re required to use a full note every time, whereas in some other fields you can use short notes every time, as long as all sources are listed in your bibliography . If you’re not sure, check with your instructor.

In a Chicago style footnote , list up to three authors. If there are more than three, name only the first author, followed by “ et al. “

In the bibliography , list up to 10 authors. If there are more than 10, list the first seven followed by “et al.”

The same rules apply in Chicago author-date style .

To automatically generate accurate Chicago references, you can use Scribbr’s free Chicago reference generator .

In a Chicago footnote citation , when the author of a source is unknown (as is often the case with websites ), start the citation with the title in a full note. In short notes and bibliography entries, list the organization that published it as the author.

In Chicago author-date style , treat the organization as author in your in-text citations and reference list.

When an online source does not list a publication date, replace it with an access date in your Chicago footnotes and your bibliography :

If you are using author-date in-text citations , or if the source was not accessed online, replace the date with “n.d.”

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2022, December 05). Citing a Newspaper Article in Chicago Style | Format & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved December 12, 2023, from https://www.scribbr.com/chicago-style/newspapers-magazines/

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Chicago/Turabian Style Citation Examples

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REFERENCE LIST (ONE AUTHOR)    

(For more examples refer to section 19.2 in the 9th edition)

newspaper article citation example

PARENTHETICAL CITATION (IN-TEXT)

(Levers 2023, 398-399)

  • Edited Book
  • Multiple authors

(For more examples refer to sections 19.1.1-9 in the 9th edition)

newspaper article citation example

(Larson 2018, 121) (Author's last name exactly as given in reference list Year, page number(s))

REFERENCE LIST (EDITED BOOK)    

newspaper article citation example

(McGinley, Burk, and Ward 2022, 157-158)

REFERENCE LIST (Multiple authors NOT editors)    

newspaper article citation example

(Webb and Hessel 2022, 203)

REFERENCE LIST (ELECTRONIC BOOK)    

(For more examples refer to section 19.1.10 in the 9th edition)

newspaper article citation example

(Weaver 2014, 74)

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Harvard Clears Its President of ‘Research Misconduct’ After Plagiarism Charges

The university started an investigation after receiving accusations in October as its president, Claudine Gay, was being criticized for her response to antisemitism on campus.

The campus of Harvard on a sunny day, with someone walking in shadow.

By Jennifer Schuessler and Vimal Patel

The battle over the fate of Harvard’s president, Claudine Gay, took an unexpected turn this week, as accusations of plagiarism in her scholarly work surfaced, along with questions about how the university had handled them.

On Tuesday, the Harvard Corporation, the university’s governing body, announced that Dr. Gay would keep her job, despite the uproar over her statements on campus antisemitism at a congressional hearing. But the Corporation also revealed that it had conducted a review of her published work after receiving accusations in October about three of her articles.

The Corporation said that while the review found that she had not violated the university’s standards for “research misconduct,” it did discover “a few instances of inadequate citation.” Dr. Gay would request “four corrections in two articles to insert citations and quotation marks that were omitted from the original publications,” the statement said.

The accusations were first widely publicized on Sunday, in a newsletter by the conservative education activist Christopher Rufo. On Monday, The Washington Free Beacon, a conservative media outlet, published its own investigation , identifying what it said were issues with four papers published between 1993 and 2017. The article said the papers had paraphrased or quoted nearly 20 authors without proper attribution.

By Tuesday evening, there was growing concern about Dr. Gay’s work and Harvard’s actions, after The New York Post reported that it had approached Harvard in October about similar accusations.

According to The Post, it had contacted Harvard on Oct. 24, seeking comment on what it said were more than two dozen passages in which Dr. Gay’s words seemed to closely parallel the words, phrases or sentences in published works by other scholars.

A few days later, The Post said, it received a 15-page response from a lawyer who identified himself as a defamation counsel for Harvard and Dr. Gay.

Jonathan Swain, a spokesman for the university, said on Tuesday evening that the Harvard Corporation stood by its statement from earlier in the day. He declined to comment further. A spokeswoman for The Post said: “The story speaks for itself.”

Dr. Gay has strongly defended her work. “I stand by the integrity of my scholarship,” she said in a statement on Monday. “Throughout my career, I have worked to ensure my scholarship adheres to the highest academic standards.”

The accusations could deepen the turmoil around Dr. Gay, who was inaugurated as president in September. After the Oct. 7 Hamas-led attack on Israel, she was harshly criticized by some students, faculty members, alumni and university donors for what they saw as a series of tepid responses to events in Israel and Gaza and to rising antisemitism on campus.

That seemed to reach a climax last week, when Representative Elise Stefanik, Republican of New York, sharply questioned Dr. Gay and two other college presidents about what she characterized as tolerance for calls for genocide against Jews.

On Tuesday, Ms. Stefanik criticized Harvard’s decision to stand behind Dr. Gay. “The only update to the code of conduct is to allow a plagiarist as the president of Harvard,” she said during a news conference.

Dr. Gay, Harvard’s first Black president , has been a professor of government and of African and African American studies at the university since 2006. Her scholarship has explored subjects like how the election of minority officeholders affects citizens’ perception of government, and how housing mobility programs affect political participation for the poor.

At Harvard, where she received her doctorate in 1998, she has been both a barrier-breaker and savvy insider, steadily climbing the administrative ranks since joining the faculty.

The Harvard Corporation’s statement on Dr. Gay does not use the word “plagiarism.” But some members of Harvard’s faculty said they were disturbed by the passages highlighted in news coverage, saying students who committed similar infractions were often disciplined, sometimes harshly.

“It’s troubling to see the standards we apply to undergrads seem to differ from the standards we apply to faculty,” said Theda Skocpol, a professor of government.

A Harvard guide for students defines “plagiarism” broadly. “When you fail to cite your sources, or when you cite them inadequately, you are plagiarizing, which is taken extremely seriously at Harvard,” it says. “Plagiarism is defined as the act of intentionally OR unintentionally submitting work that was written by somebody else.”

But not all instances of potential plagiarism are equal, particularly when they do not reflect any intention to deceive, some scholars said.

Dr. Gay’s 1997 dissertation, The Free Beacon said, “borrowed” two paragraphs from a 1996 conference paper by Bradley Palmquist, who was then a political science professor at Harvard, and Stephen Voss, a political scientist at the University of Kentucky who was in Dr. Gay’s doctoral program at Harvard.

In an interview, Dr. Voss called Dr. Gay’s use of his work, which involved changing only a few words, “technically plagiarism.” But said he considered it “fairly benign,” particularly since the paragraphs in question involved a technical description.

“If a student gave me a paper that did what she did, I would bounce it back to them,” he said.

Katie Robertson contributed reporting.

Jennifer Schuessler is a culture reporter covering intellectual life and the world of ideas. She is based in New York. More about Jennifer Schuessler

Vimal Patel is a higher education reporter for The Times, focusing on speech and campus culture. He was previously a reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education. More about Vimal Patel

The Harvard Crimson Logo

  • Editor's Pick

Despite Support From Corporation, Harvard President Gay Under Fire Over Plagiarism Allegations

Harvard President Claudine Gay is facing allegations of plagiarism, as claimed by two publications as of Monday night.

Updated: Wednesday, December 13 at 1:15 a.m.

The allegations come at a uniquely perilous time for Gay, who has been called on to resign by alumni, donors, and members of Congress following her controversial remarks at a congressional hearing on antisemitism on college campuses last Tuesday.

Though The Crimson reported early Tuesday morning that the Harvard Corporation, Harvard’s highest governing body, will express confidence in Gay’s leadership and not remove her, the allegations of plagiarism represent yet another scandal for an increasingly weary president just reaching the end of her first semester.

In a statement to affiliates Tuesday, members of the Harvard Corporation reaffirmed their support for Gay’s leadership. Still, they addressed concerns raised regarding Gay’s scholarship, writing that the “University became aware in late October of allegations regarding three articles.”

“At President Gay’s request, the Fellows promptly initiated an independent review by distinguished political scientists and conducted a review of her published work,” they wrote.

“On December 9, the Fellows reviewed the results, which revealed a few instances of inadequate citation,” they added. “While the analysis found no violation of Harvard’s standards for research misconduct, President Gay is proactively requesting four corrections in two articles to insert citations and quotation marks that were omitted from the original publications.”

They did not specify which articles were found to contain improperly cited material or which were being corrected.

The plagiarism charges — some of which had surfaced on anonymous academia forums over the past year but were only recently widely reported — are sure to cast even more doubt on the embattled president’s fitness for the job, even if she is not in imminent danger of losing it.

In a post on X Sunday night, right-wing activist Christopher F. Rufo said he and journalist Christopher Brunet intentionally released the story amid calls for Gay’s ouster as Harvard’s governing boards met to discuss the controversy surrounding her testimony.

“@RealChrisBrunet and I sat on the Claudine Gay plagiarism materials for the past week, waiting for the precise moment of maximum impact,” Rufo wrote. “The Harvard board is meeting tonight and there are rumors that the plagiarism scandal could be the final nail in Gay's coffin.”

The claim was amplified by Bill A. Ackman ’88, a hedge fund CEO who has been a vocal critic of Gay and has called for her resignation. Ackman posted on X that he sent the allegations to a “senior member of the @Harvard faculty,” who “found them to be credible.” He did not identify a specific faculty member by name.

The allegations of plagiarism range from omitting quotation marks but still citing her sources to apparently copying an entire paragraph of data description almost verbatim from another work without any citation.

Gay defended her work in a statement Monday morning following the Substack post.

“I stand by the integrity of my scholarship. Throughout my career, I have worked to ensure my scholarship adheres to the highest academic standards,” Gay wrote.

University spokesperson Jonathan L. Swain declined to comment on the Free Beacon article — published Monday evening — referring back to Gay’s statement.

The Free Beacon article focused on four articles by Gay: a 1993 essay in Origins, a shared publication between the Ohio State University and Miami University; her 1997 Ph.D. dissertation from her time as a graduate student at Harvard; and two papers she wrote while a professor at Harvard, in 2012 and 2017. Rufo and Brunet’s Substack post only discussed her dissertation.

The Crimson independently reviewed the published allegations. Though some are minor — consisting of passages that are similar or identical to Gay’s sources, lacking quotation marks but including citations — others are more substantial, including some paragraphs and sentences nearly identical to other work and lacking citations.

Some appear to violate Harvard’s current policies around plagiarism and academic integrity.

A Harvard web page titled “What Constitutes Plagiarism?” says that when copying language “word for word from another source,” scholars “must give credit to the author of the source material, either by placing the source material in quotation marks and providing a clear citation, or by paraphrasing the source material and providing a clear citation.”

The Crimson could not confirm whether such policies or similar versions were in place in 1997, when her dissertation was published. Swain did not answer questions about the state of the policy at the time.

Doctoral Dissertation

Both the Free Beacon and the post by Rufo and Brunet said that Gay improperly attributed portions of her 1997 Harvard doctoral dissertation, titled “Taking Charge: Black Electoral Success and the Redefinition of American Politics.”

The Free Beacon accused Gay of lifting two paragraphs from then-Harvard affiliated scholars D. Stephen Voss and Bradley Palmquist’s article “Racial Polarization and Turnout in Louisiana: New Insights from Aggregate Data Analysis.”

One implicated paragraph — a technical description of statistical results — is nearly identical to Voss and Palmquist’s work and differs by only a few select words, including changing “decrease” to “increase” to reflect a different dataset.

The second repeats some exact phrases from Voss and Palmquist’s article while others are rearranged or slightly revised to fit Gay’s dissertation.

At no point in either paragraph does Gay use quotation marks or include in-text citations. Voss and Palmquist are not cited anywhere in Gay’s dissertation.

In an interview Monday night, Voss — who said he taught Gay methods at Harvard while he was a teaching fellow and she was a student — said the work was “technically plagiarism,” but described it as “minor-to-inconsequential.”

Voss, now an associate professor at the University of Kentucky, said he was unbothered by her use of his words because it was a technical description of a quantitative method, the scope of the description was “fairly limited,” and he felt she may have picked up research practices from her instructors.

He added that similar descriptions of technical methods are common throughout academia.

“This doesn’t at all look sneaky,” Voss said. “It looks like maybe she just didn’t have a sense of what we normally tell students they’re supposed to do and not do.”

Palmquist did not respond to a request for comment.

Rufo and Brunet also focused on Gay’s dissertation, writing that the paper “lifts an entire paragraph nearly verbatim” from a paper by Lawrence D. Bobo and Franklin D. Gilliam Jr. as well as other scholars without using quotation marks. They also alleged that Gay plagiarized political scientist Carol M. Swain and Harvard professor Gary King, who was Gay’s dissertation adviser.

They pointed to sections of Gay’s dissertation where she referenced the work of other scholars with nearly identical wording to the original papers, including a citation of the authors but not direct quotes.

In one passage, Gay describes Bobo and Gilliam’s findings using almost their exact language, replacing references to “blacks” with “African-Americans.” She attributes the findings to both scholars by name but only directly quotes the phrase “high black-empowerment.”

But Bobo, King, and Gilliam all said they did not feel Gay plagiarized their work.

In an emailed statement, King — who holds Harvard’s highest faculty rank as a University Professor — called the claims “false and absurd” and “crazy.”

“Her dissertation and every one of the numerous drafts I read leading up to the final version met the highest levels of academic integrity,” he wrote. “If you were going to commit plagiarism, would you plagiarize your professor's work and expect to get away with it?”

Bobo, the dean of Social Science at Harvard, wrote that he is “unconcerned about these claims as our work was explicitly acknowledged.”

When asked about the passage concerning Bobo and Gilliam, King wrote that the essence of plagiarism is passing someone else’s work off as original, which he added was not the case here.

“Is there any sense in which you can’t tell that she is describing Bobo and Gilliam’s article and not her own work in the passage you sent?” King asked.

Gilliam, now the chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, wrote in an email late Tuesday that “I, too, do not believe it is plagiarism.”

In their Substack post, Rufo and Brunet wrote that Gay also plagiarized from Swain, a political scientist whose work revolves around race relations and politics, specifically citing a reference to a statistic on the House reelection rate.

Rufo and Brunet did not note that Gay cited Swain in the following sentence. Her dissertation reads, “Since the 1950s, the reelection rate for incumbent House members has rarely dipped below 90%. In 1994 it was 92.3% (Swain 1997).”

Though the first sentence appeared nearly verbatim in Swain’s article, titled “Women and Blacks in Congress: 1870-1996,” the second sentence does not. Instead, Swain writes about the reelection rate in 1988, 1990, 1992, and 1994, using different wording than Gay.

Rufo and Brunet further claimed that Gay used similar language to Swain’s 1993 book “Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress,” without including a citation, in describing the concepts of “descriptive representation” and “substantive representation.”

Gay’s description of the two phrases and their role in academic debates over minority representation in politics is followed by a list of 19 citations, though Swain’s book is not among them.

Swain said she believes Gay’s alleged misuse of sources, whether done intentionally or not, fits the description of plagiarism.

“That would be troubling in a Ph.D. dissertation if it was done intentionally, and if it was done accidentally, then it would still be problematic,” Swain said in an interview. “Maybe she didn’t know any better, but it would qualify as plagiarism under Harvard’s own rules.”

Additional Works

In 1993, while still a graduate student at Harvard, Gay published a six-page essay in Origins, the Miami University and The Ohio State University collaboration, titled “Between Black and White: The Complexity of Brazilian Race Relations.”

Substantial portions of two paragraphs in the piece are worded either exactly the same or have minor changes in wording as a 1992 essay by the historian George Reid Andrews titled “Black Political Protest in São Paulo, 1888-1988.”

In another sentence in the same Origins piece, Gay uses almost the exact same wording in two instances as a 1990 journal article by David Covin, then a professor at California State University, Sacramento, titled “Afrocentricity in O Movimento Negro Unificado.”

Neither article is cited in Gay’s piece, which includes no formal citations. Andrews’ book “Blacks and Whites in Sao Paulo, Brazil” is listed in a box at the end titled “Suggestions for Further Reading,” though his 1992 journal article is not. Covin’s journal article is also not listed in the “Suggestions for Further Reading” section.

It was not clear whether Origins is peer-reviewed.

Andrews, Covin, and the current editors of Origins did not respond to requests for comment Monday evening.

The Free Beacon also pointed to Gay’s 2012 article “Moving To Opportunity: the Political Effects of a Housing Mobility Experiment,” published in the Urban Affairs Review. The news site alleged that Gay “borrowed language” from a 2003 report by Abt Associates Inc. and members of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Three of the eight authors work at Harvard.

The Free Beacon identified four instances in her article where Gay had identical or near-identical language as the 2003 report.

In one instance, Gay does not cite the report. In two other instances, which appear in consecutive paragraphs, Gay references the report at the end of the second paragraph as a place to find “similar approaches.” In the fourth instance — where Gay does not use identical language but very similar language as the 2003 report — Gay also does not cite the report.

In a statement, Jeffrey B. Liebman, a professor at Harvard Kennedy School and one of the authors of the 2003 report, wrote, “I do not see any signs of plagiarism,” adding that four of his co-authors also do not have any concerns.

“It is not surprising when two researchers describe the same statistical procedure or the same government program using similar language,” Liebman wrote. “As the MTO research unfolded, lots of us contributed to developing and refining the language that we used for these basic descriptions, and all of us, including President Gay, had the right to use and adapt this common language.”

The other seven co-writers of the report did not respond to a request for comment or could not be reached.

According to the Free Beacon, Gay’s 2017 article, “A Room for One’s Own? The Partisan Allocation of Affordable Housing” — also published in the Urban Affairs Review — “borrowed language” from Alex F. Schwartz’s 2010 book “Housing Policy in the United States” and a 2011 paper by Matthew Freedman and Emily G. Owens, both professors at the University of California, Irvine.

One sentence toward the beginning of Gay’s article contains a phrase almost identical to one in Schwartz’s book, with the word “virtually” substituted for “nearly.”

The Free Beacon initially reported that Schwartz was not cited in the paragraph at all, when in fact, his work was cited at the end of the subsequent sentence in Gay’s article. The publication corrected the error after being contacted by The Crimson Monday night.

The report also alleged that Gay’s article plagiarized Freedman and Owens’ paper in her description of a technical metric used in her study. Gay’s phrase is worded almost identically to the language used by Freedman and Owens, save for her inclusion of the word “financial.”

The Urban Affairs Review did not respond to a request for comment Monday evening.

But both Schwartz and Owens, in emails to The Crimson, said they did not consider Gay’s use of their work to be plagiarism.

“In my opinion this excerpt in no way constitutes any resemblance to plagiarism,” Schwartz wrote. “The text merely presents well founded facts about the Low Income Housing Tax Credit.”

Owens wrote that Gay’s adoption of “such short phrases” did not amount to “taking credit for another’s writing or ideas.”

“This is particularly the case when the phrases in question are a brief description of how someone aggregates a variable and a summary observation about a specific technical point,” Owens wrote.

“Something that gives me pause, and that I have encountered a handful of times, are entire paragraphs or multi-sentence footnotes that are presented as an author’s independent conclusion or analysis,” she added. “This does not strike me as the situation with my paper with professor Matthew Freedman.”

—Staff writer Rahem D. Hamid can be reached at [email protected] .

—Staff writer Nia L. Orakwue can be reached at [email protected] . Follow her on X @nia_orakwue .

—Staff writer Elias J. Schisgall can be reached at [email protected] . Follow him on X @eschisgall .

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Chicago/Turabian Citation Guide (17th Edition): Newspaper Articles

  • Author-Date
  • Bibliography & Sample Papers
  • Annotated Bibliography

About These Examples

The following examples are for the  Notes-Bibliography  system of Chicago/Turabian. This means that you are citing your courses using either footnotes or endnotes. If your teacher has asked you to cite your sources using in-text citations in brackets, visit this page to find out how to format these citations in the Author-Date system of Chicago/Turabian.

On This Page: Newspapers

Newspaper article from a library database, newspaper article from a library database - newspapers with volumes and issues, newspaper article from a website, newspaper article in print, citing two authors, citing three or more authors, abbreviating months.

In your works cited list, abbreviate months as follows: 

January = Jan. February = Feb. March = Mar. April = Apr. May = May June = June July = July August = Aug. September = Sept. October = Oct. November = Nov. December = Dec.

Spell out months fully in the body of your paper. 

How Can I Tell if it's a Newspaper?

Photo from Flickr, created by user NS Newsflash. Available under a Creative Commons license.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Articles are usually written by journalists who may or may not have subject expertise.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from journals or magazines .

Note : For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [city of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name], Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

 Note: If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [City of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name of newspaper], vol. Volume Number, no. Issues Number, Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Title of Website,  Date of Publication, URL. Accessed Day Month Year site was visited .

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper, Date of Publication, p. Page Number. 

If there are two authors, cite the the authors as follows (list authors in the order they are given on the page, not alphabetically):

Last Name, First Name of First Author, and First Name Last Name of Second Author.

Example: Smith, James, and Sarah Johnston.

If there are three or more authors, cite only the name of the first author listed with their Last Name, First Name Middle Name followed by a comma et al.

Example: Smith, James, et al.

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  2. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA With Examples

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  3. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in APA 7 With Examples

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  4. Newspapers and magazines

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  5. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Cite a Newspaper Article

    An MLA Works Cited entry for a newspaper article lists the article title in quotation marks and the name of the newspaper in italics. A URL is listed at the end for an article consulted online. The MLA in-text citation for an online newspaper article consists solely of the author's last name. MLA format. Author last name, First name.

  2. How to Cite a Newspaper in APA Style

    Always include the letters when page numbers are formatted in this way. Newspaper articles may also appear on discontinuous pages (for example, an article which begins on the front page but continues on page 20). Make sure to only cite the relevant pages, separating different pages and page ranges with commas. APA format.

  3. Newspaper article references

    In the source element of the reference, provide at minimum the title of the newspaper in italic title case. If the newspaper article is from an online newspaper that has a URL that will resolve for readers (as in the Carey example), include the URL of the article at the end of the reference. If volume, issue, and/or page numbers for the article ...

  4. How to Cite a Newspaper in MLA

    Citing a newspaper from a database. To cite a newspaper article you accessed through a database, just include the usual information for a print newspaper, followed by the name of the database in italics. MLA format. Author last name, First name. " Article Title .". Newspaper Name, Day Month Year, p. Page number. Database Name.

  5. MLA Works Cited Page: Periodicals

    Periodicals include magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. Works cited entries for periodical sources include three main elements—the author of the article, the title of the article, and information about the magazine, newspaper, or journal. MLA uses the generic term "container" to refer to any print or digital venue (a website or ...

  6. Magazine/Newspaper Articles

    Note: All citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent in a Reference List. A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches. This Microsoft support page contains instructions about how to format a hanging indent in a paper.

  7. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in APA

    To cite a newspaper article in APA format, you should have the following information: Article title (in sentence case). need to include retrieval information (e.g., date of access) in APA citations for electronic resources. If you found a newspaper article through an online database (e.g., EBSCO's Academic Search Complete), you do not need to ...

  8. Newspaper Article

    General Format. In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): (Author Surname, Year) In-Text Citation (Quotation): (Author Surname, Year, page number) References: Author Surname, First Initial. Second Initial. (Year, Month Day). Article title: Subtitle. Newspaper Title, page range. URL [if viewed online] Example 1. In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): (Wallace ...

  9. Newspaper Article Reference Examples

    Use this format to cite a newspaper article you found the article in print form or from a database like News & Newspapers - ProQuest. General Format. Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper, Section. For Example. Brody, L. (2020, January 13). Cherry blossoms can't wait for spring. Wall Street Journal, A.10B.

  10. Newspaper Articles

    The basic format for a newspaper article includes the author's name (if available), the headline, the name of the newspaper, the date of the issue, and the section and page numbers where the article is located. Turabian recommends citing newspaper articles only in the notes unless the article is critical to an argument or is frequently cited.

  11. Citation Examples

    Citation Examples | Books, Articles, Websites & More. Published on April 9, 2021 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on June 27, 2022. The most common citation styles are APA and MLA. To cite a source in these styles, you need a brief in-text citation and a full reference. Use the interactive tool to understand how a citation is structured and see ...

  12. APA Citation Guide (7th Edition): Newspaper Articles

    For example (4, 6, 12-14) For newspaper articles, put p. before the page number if the article is one page long and pp. if it is more than one page. Formatting Note: ... Use double quotation marks around the words from title of an article in the in-text citation. Newspaper Article From a Website Author's Last Name, First Initial. Second Initial ...

  13. Magazine/Newspaper Articles

    Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article, but note the different pagination in most newspapers. If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition after the newspaper title. ... In-Text Citation Example: (Author's Last Name Page Number) (Kershner A8 ...

  14. Newspaper Article Reference Examples

    Use this format to cite a newspaper article you found the article in print form or from a database like News & Newspapers - ProQuest. General Format. Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Title of article. Title of newspaper, Section. For Example. Brody, L. (2020, January 13). Cherry blossoms can't wait for spring. Wall Street Journal, A.10B.

  15. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in APA

    Full Citation Rules. To cite a newspaper article in APA on the References page, follow this formula: Author's Last Name, First Initial. Middle Initial. (Year, Month Day). Title of article. Title of periodical, Volume (Issue), Page #. DOI or URL.

  16. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA

    The templates for in-text citations and works-cited-list entries of an online newspaper article, along with examples, are given below for one author: In-text citation template and example: For citations in prose, use the first name and surname of the author in the first occurrence. In subsequent citations, use only the surname.

  17. MLA Citation Guide (MLA 9th Edition): Newspaper Articles

    Begin the newspaper article citation with the title of the article if the author's name is not listed. For the in-text citation, list the first word or first few words of the title (excluding a, an, the). ... Format. Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of New Publication, Date of Publication, URL. Example ...

  18. APA Citation Guide (7th edition) : Newspaper Articles

    If an article has no page numbers provided, leave that part of the citation out in the References List. If an article doesn't appear on continuous pages, list all the page numbers the article is on, separated by commas. For example (4, 6, 12-14).

  19. MLA Citation Guide (9th Edition): Newspaper Articles

    Works Cited Example: Schmidt, Sarah. "Companies Fail the Test; Junk Food Marketing Aimed at Kids Faulted." The Gazette [Montreal], 10 Mar. 2010, p. A.11. Canadian Newsstand. Note: If an article ends with a question mark or exclamation mark (!), you do not need to add a period to mark the end of the title. In-Text Citation Example

  20. APA Citation Newspaper Article Examples

    How to Cite a Newspaper Article APA In-Text. When it comes to creating in-text citations for newspaper articles in APA, you follow the APA format. This means that you use the author and year. For a direct quote, you also include the page number. Newspaper Article APA In-Text Example - Paraphrase

  21. Citing a Newspaper Article in Chicago Style

    Citing a magazine article. Magazine articles are cited in a very similar format to newspaper articles, but with a couple of key differences. First, magazine articles must appear in the bibliography.. Second, page numbers (when available) may be used in footnote citations of magazines.

  22. In-Text Citations

    An in-text citation is required whenever the writer quotes, paraphrases, or summarizes from the source. A parenthetical in-text citation consists of the author's last name and page number within a parenthesis. Example- (author's last name page number). Citation: Boggs, Colleen Glenney. "Public Reading and the Civil War Draft Lottery."

  23. Author-Date style

    Find how to cite a web page, journal, book, eBook, textbook, magazine, newspaper, video, DVD, TV show, Twitter, or Instagram. Find how to format in-text/parenthetical citations, foot/endnotes, and how to cite when no author or date. Author-date style examples

  24. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA With Examples

    To cite a newspaper article in MLA, you need the author's name, title, publisher, date, and the page number. An MLA citation for a newspaper article example looks like: Daren, Roger. "A Sign of the Times.". Fictional Newspaper, 10 August 2020, p. C12.

  25. Harvard Clears Its President of 'Research Misconduct' After Plagiarism

    Adam Glanzman for The New York Times. The battle over the fate of Harvard's president, Claudine Gay, took an unexpected turn this week, as accusations of plagiarism in her scholarly work ...

  26. Despite Support From Corporation, Harvard ...

    The Free Beacon article focused on four articles by Gay: a 1993 essay in Origins, a shared publication between the Ohio State University and Miami University; her 1997 Ph.D. dissertation from her ...

  27. Newspaper Articles

    Note: If an article ends with a question mark or exclamation mark (!), you do not need to add a period to mark the end of the title. In-Text Citation Example (Author's Last Name Page Number) (Schmidt A11) Note: If an article is only one page long, you do not need to provide the page number in the in-text citation.