The Classroom | Empowering Students in Their College Journey

How to Write a Biography to Win a Scholarship

Dr. Kelly S. Meier

What Should Be Included in a College Application Letter?

You’re a top achiever in high school, involved in clubs and organizations and excited to start college. Applying for a scholarship is a logical next step in your college preparation journey. How can you differentiate your application from the thousands of other student leaders looking for funding? A dynamic, content-rich biography is the first step in gaining the attention of a scholarship review committee. Start by becoming familiar with the scholarship requirements and brainstorm a list of your qualities and experiences.

Strong Introduction

A winning biography begins with a captivating introduction. Your opening sentence serves as a way to get the reader to read more. Begin with a sentence that describes who you are and why you're an ideal choice for the scholarship. For example, if you're applying for a flute scholarship, explain when you began playing and why it's so important to you. Use the rest of the introduction to show off your special attributes. The reader should feel compelled to learn more about you as a scholarship candidate. You may even want to write it after finishing the biography to ensure you have accurately outlined your essay.

Showcase Your Talents

A biography should not be a list of your accomplishments but rather an opportunity to highlight why and how you’re talented. You may be tempted to write a paragraph about what you did in high school, but reserve this for an activity résumé. Instead, describe one experience that you feel best highlights who you are as a student or leader. For example, share a story about a community service project you initiated and what you and others learned from the experience. Explain how it taught you about teamwork and serving others. A reader will be impressed with your reflection on a real-life experience, and it will showcase your talents.

Stay on Message

Don’t be afraid to share your thoughts and feelings, but be certain they’re relevant to the scholarship. For example, a poignant story about a family hardship may seem like a good way to win the hearts of the decision-makers, but if it’s irrelevant to the focus of the scholarship, it may do more harm than good. On the other hand, if you took care of an ailing grandparent and through this experience decided you wanted to work in health care, the story might be relevant to your scholarship application. The ideal biography provides a personal story that serves as a connection between the scholarship focus and the applicant.

Biography Don'ts

When you're writing a biographical statement, don't dwell on tragedies you've encountered in your life. Instead, stay positive and describe the ways you've been successful and goal-oriented. Similarly, avoid using money as a main reason you're interested in the scholarship. Focus on why your accomplishments are a good match for scholarship recognition. Your ethnicity or socio-economic background should not be a main focus of your scholarship biography unless the criterion indicates this is a requirement for selection. Finally, be authentic in the vocabulary you use. The scholarship committee will be more interested in your biography if it comes from the heart and sounds like it was written with personal passion.

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Dr. Kelly Meier earned her doctorate from Minnesota State Mankato in Educational Leadership. She is the author and co-author of 12 books and serves as a consultant in K-12 and higher education. Dr. Meier is is a regular contributor for The Equity Network and has worked in education for more than 30 years.

how to write biography for scholarship

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Scholarship Biography Template and Examples

We would like you to follow the instructions below when writing your bio for your scholarship application. If you are awarded a scholarship, this bio will be used on our website and in the program at the Scholarship Luncheon and we are trying to make them more consistent from the start.

First paragraph:

(Name of Scholarship Recipient) is a/an (undergraduate/graduate at school name). If a graduate student, please add your undergraduate degree and institution. Describe briefly what your major is – field of study, specific certificates and/or credentials being awarded, and any additional minors to be achieved. If appropriate and relevant, please add country of origin (especially if an international student.)

Second paragraph:

Please describe any clubs in which you participate or relevant honors which you have been awarded; leadership experiences; and, community outreach you have performed. For graduate students please add any work experience between undergrad and graduate programs, as well as your post-graduate intentions.

Please also describe your expected path post-graduation.

SAMPLES - UNDERGRADUATE

Qurat Ul Ain Syeda San Jose State University

Qurat is a first-generation college student at San Jose State University pursuing a degree in accounting. On campus, she assists students and faculty as an instructional student assistant, is the national reporting secretary for Beta Alpha Psi, and a member of the highly selective Sbona Honors Program. As part of this program, she has led her team’s marketing project with an EdTech company and spearheaded a research project for BPM LLP. Qurat is passionate about contributing to the future of fintech and blockchain. For now, she is excited to have accepted an internship with PriceWaterhouseCoopers. Qurat also hopes to light the path and serve as role model for young Muslim women who want to have a career in accounting.

Maria Ortega University of California, Berkeley

Maria is an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, double majoring in business administration and environmental economics. Maria grew up in a rural town in Mexico where the highest education offered was middle school. She embraced the educational opportunity she found when she moved to California. At UC Berkeley, she consults nonprofits through the Association for Socially Responsible Business and mentors high schools students through their college application process. Maria has also served as the executive administrator for the Latino Business Student Association and is committed to increasing Latino representation in businesses. For the past two summers, Maria has interned at Deloitte where she developed her interest in the financial services industry. Her goal is to combine this with her passion for environmental sustainability.

SAMPLES - GRADUATE

Swati Chopra Wharton San Francisco

Swati earned her undergraduate degree in finance from University of Delhi, India. She began her career as a day trader and eventually transitioned into cybersecurity at SonicWall and Cisco. It was then that she found her passion of blending technology with finance and began to find solutions aimed at securing financial institutions from the most vulnerable of breaches. Currently, she is a director of customer success at Bitglass, a company that secures major financial institutions’ confidential data in the cloud. Swati is pursuing a Wharton Executive MBA with focus on finance, entrepreneurship, VC funding, and corporate valuation. She is also passionate about women’s empowerment and upliftment. She aims to set up an organization that will focus on increasing employability for underprivileged women to help them become financially independent.

Lauren Fu University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business

Lauren is a first-year MBA student at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is also a consultant at Blockchain, VP of Academics at the Haas Fintech Club, and an academic cohort representative. Prior to Haas Business School, Lauren worked in securitization origination for CIBC Capital Markets where she structured and executed over $20bn in transaction volume, managed client relationships, and oversaw the entire transaction process. Lauren is so passionate about fintech and VC investing that she founded a firm in hopes of redesigning the securitization ecosystem using blockchain technology.

how to write biography for scholarship

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How to Start a Scholarship Essay (With Examples)

how to write biography for scholarship

As an admissions officer, I reviewed thousands of essays for students seeking admission and scholarships. The essay is one of the most important parts of the scholarship application process–a strong essay can go a long way. However, with so much competition, it is important for your scholarship essay to stand out. That’s why it’s important for you to start a scholarship essay off right!

There are some very simple things that you can do to ensure that your essay is engaging from the very first sentence. In fact, beginning your essay with an exciting opening is one of the most important things you can do, because it will immediately distinguish your essay from the others. 

Keep on reading to learn more about how you can nail the very first sentence and start your essay off right!

Engage the reader with the first sentence

No matter what type of essay you are writing, you will want to ensure that the very first line grabs the attention of the reader. One of the biggest mistakes that students make when starting their essay is simply restating the prompt. This is bland and boring. 

Now, you might be wondering, “how do I engage the reader with the very first line of my essay?”. The good news is that there are several ways that you can do this that are very simple to do. 

Related:  How to answer scholarship essay questions about your career goals

Begin with dialogue

First, you could begin your essay with conversation. This can be an interesting and unexpected way to start your scholarship essay. Maybe someone asked you an unexpected question? Perhaps you were having an interesting conversation with a friend or family member? Either way, dialogue can be a powerful tool to start your essay.

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Put the reader in your shoes.

Alternatively, you can choose to start your essay by placing the reader right in your shoes and show them something from your life. Appeal to the senses and show the reader what you see, hear, smell, or taste. These specific details will help your essay come to life and make it even more memorable. 

Also recommended: What’s the best scholarship essay format?

Scholarship essay introduction example

Next,  we’ll look at a specific example of how you can open up your essay. Let’s say you are applying for the Questbridge scholarship program . One of the essays that you will be asked is:

We are interested in learning more about you and the context in which you have grown up, formed your aspirations, and accomplished your academic successes. Please describe the factors and challenges that have most influenced you. How are they shaping your future aspirations?

You might be tempted to rephrase the question and start your essay with something like:

“I have grown up in a rural context and this has formed my aspirations and allowed me to accomplish academic success…”

This is generic and will not engage your reader at all. 

Instead, what if you started off your essay with something like this:

“I look outside my bedroom window and see Henry, my favorite chicken, pecking at something in the dirt.” 

Makes a big difference, right? As a reader, you are probably wondering: why does this person have chickens outside their bedroom window? Why did they name this particular chicken Henry?

See also: Here are our top writing & essay scholarships for students!

Keep the ending of your essay in mind as you write the opening

While crafting your opening, be open to ideas about how to close your essay. There is no need to stress about the ending now, but being mindful of effective ways to end an essay is always a good idea. Say you are opening your scholarship essay with Henry the chicken. Is there a way for Henry to make an impactful appearance at the end of the essay to close things out in a way that perfectly wraps everything up? The key is for the essay ending to be meaningful and memorable for the reader. 

Don’t miss: Our free scholarship search tool

If you can’t think of a “wow” scholarship essay beginning, keep writing!

Sometimes, we know what we want to say, point by point, but we are not ready to be creative when it comes to opening an essay. In that case, keep writing! There is always the option of going back and crafting an engaging opening after your essay is written. Simply write your main idea where the first paragraph would be to guide you as you write. After, go back when your creative juices are flowing, and craft the amazing opening (and closing) that your scholarship essay deserves!

Final thoughts

As shown, there are many questions that we as readers will have after reading an engaging essay opening such as the one just shared; We want to learn more about the student who is writing this essay. After all, as a writer trying to stand out in a pile of essays, that is our main goal. 

We hope that you have a better understanding of how to start a scholarship essay so you can maximize your chances of winning scholarships!

Additional resources

Scholarships360 is the go-to for all things college admissions and scholarships! Wondering how to write a 250 word essay and how to write a 500 word essay ? Curious how to write an essay about yourself ? Wow, do we have the resources to help! Additionally, check out our free scholarship search tool to help you finance your college education. Best of luck to you and your future endeavors! 

Key Takeaways

  • The first sentence of the essay is what makes the reader want to continue reading 
  • Engage the reader by appealing to the senses
  • Create a sense of wonder in your essay, making the reader want to learn more about you
  • Keep the ending of the essay in mind as you craft the beginning

Frequently asked questions about how to start a scholarship essay

What is an essay hook, how long should my scholarship essay be, scholarships360 recommended.

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How to Write a Personal Statement for a Scholarship + Examples

What’s covered:, what is the purpose of the scholarship personal statement, what to include in your personal statement, personal statement example: breakdown + analysis, how to make sure your writing is effective.

Either before or after you’ve gotten into your dream school, you’ll have to figure out how to pay for it. For most students, this involves a combination of financial aid, parent contributions, self-contributions, student loans, and scholarships/grants. Because scholarships are money out of someone else’s pocket that you never have to pay back, they are a great place to start!

Scholarships come in two forms: merit-based and need-based. Need-based scholarships are also often called grants. These designations tell you whether an organization looks at your financial situation when deciding about your scholarship.

Additionally, different scholarships fall under different categories based on the mission of the organization or person providing the scholarship’s financing. These missions typically emphasize different things like academic achievement, specific career goals, community service, leadership, family background, skill in the arts, or having overcome hardship. As you select scholarships to apply for and complete your applications, you should keep these missions in mind.

No matter what type of scholarship you are applying for, you will be asked to provide the review committee with standard materials. This includes your transcript, GPA, and resume/extracurriculars, but also, importantly, your personal statement. A scholarship personal statement is a bit different from your normal college essay, so we’ve put together this guide and some examples to help you get started!

The purpose of your personal statement is to help a review committee learn more about your personality, values, goals, and what makes you special. Ultimately, like with your college essays, you are trying to humanize your profile beyond your transcript, GPA, and test scores.

College essays all have one goal in mind (which is why you can apply to multiple schools at once through applications like the Common App or Coalition App): convince admissions officers that you would be a valuable addition to the university environment. The goal of your scholarship personal statement is different and differs more from one scholarship to the next. Rather than convincing various review committees that you are a generally good candidate for extra funding for college, you need to convince each review committee that your values have historically aligned with their organization’s mission and will continue to align with their organization’s mission.

Common missions amongst those who give scholarships include:

  • Providing opportunities for students with career ambitions in a particular field
  • Helping students who have experienced unexpected hardship
  • Supporting students who show outstanding academic achievement
  • Funding the arts through investing in young artists with strong technical skill
  • Supporting the development of civic-minded community service leaders of the future
  • Providing opportunities for historically underrepresented ethnic communities 

If a specific mission like this is outlined on an organization’s website or in the promotional material for its scholarship, the purpose of your personal statement is to show how you exemplify that mission.

Some scholarships ask for your personal statement to be guided by a prompt, while others leave things open for interpretation. When you are provided a prompt, it is obvious what you must do: answer the prompt. When you are not provided a prompt, you want to write a personal statement that is essentially a small-scale autobiography where you position yourself as a good investment. In either case, you should identify a focus or theme for what you are trying to say about yourself so that your application does not get lost in the shuffle.

Prompts include questions like:

  • Why do you deserve this scholarship?
  • How have you shown your commitment to (leadership/community service/diversity) in your community?
  • When did you overcome adversity?
  • Why is attending college important to you?

If you are provided a prompt, develop a theme for your response that showcases both your values and your achievements. This will help your essay feel focused and will subsequently help the review committee to remember which candidate you were as they deliberate.

Themes include things like:

  • I deserve this community service scholarship because my compassion for intergenerational trauma has inspired me to volunteer with a local after-school program. I didn’t just sympathize. I did something about my sympathy because that’s the type of person I am. Within the program, I have identified avenues for improvement and worked alongside full-time staff to develop new strategies for increasing attendance.
  • I overcame adversity when my mother had to have a major surgery two months after giving birth to my younger brother. I was just a kid but was thrown into a situation where I had to raise another kid. It was hard, but I’m the kind of person who tries to grow from hard times and, through my experience taking care of a baby, I learned the importance of listening to body language and nonverbal cues to understand the needs of others (baby and nonbaby, alike).

Without a prompt, clarity can be harder to achieve. That said, it is of the utmost importance that you find a focus. First, think about both your goals and your values.

Types of goals include:

  • Career goals
  • Goals for personal growth
  • The type of friend you want to be
  • The change you want to make in the world

Values could include:

  • Authenticity
  • And many more!

After you write out your goals/values, write out your achievements to see what goals/values you have “proof” of your commitment to. Your essay will ultimately be an exploration of your goal/value, what you have done about your goal/value in the past, and what you aspire to in the future.

You might be tempted to reflect on areas for improvement, but scholarships care about you living out your values. It is not enough to aspire to be exemplary in leadership, community service, or your academic field. For scholarships, you have to already be exemplary.

Finally, keep in mind that the review committee likely already has a copy of your extracurricular activities and involvement. Pick one or two accomplishments, then strive for depth, not breadth as you explore them.

My interest in the field of neuroscience began at a young age.  When I was twelve years old, my sister developed a condition called Pseudotumor Cerebri following multiple concussions during a basketball game.  It took the doctors over six months to make a proper diagnosis, followed by three years of treatment before she recovered.  During this time, my love for neuroscience was sparked as I began to research her condition and, then, other neurocognitive conditions.  Later, my love of neuroscience was amplified when my mother began to suffer from brain-related health issues.  My mother had been a practicing attorney in Dallas for over twenty years.  She was a determined litigator who relentlessly tried difficult cases that changed people’s lives.  Now, she suffers from a cognitive impairment and is no longer able to practice law.  Oftentimes, she has headaches, she gets “cloudy,” her executive functioning slows down, she feels overwhelmed, and she forgets things.  My mother has gone from being the strong, confident, emotional and financial caretaker of our family to needing significant help on a daily basis. Once again, with this illness came a lot of research on my part — research that encouraged me to pursue my dreams of exploring neuroscience.

Due to my experiences with my mother and sister when I was in middle school, I knew that I wanted to make a difference in the field of neuroscience.  I also knew that, to obtain this goal, I needed to maintain superior grades in school while also pursuing opportunities outside of school to further my education.  In school, I was able to maintain superior grades to the point where I am currently valedictorian in a class of 567 students.  In addition, in school, I challenged myself by taking 16 Advanced Placement classes and 19 Honors classes.  Two of the most beneficial classes were AP Capstone Seminar and AP Capstone Research.  AP Capstone Seminar and AP Capstone Research are research-oriented classes where students are given the opportunity to pursue whatever track their research takes them down.  As a junior in AP Capstone Seminar, I researched the effects of harmful pesticide use on the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in children.  This year, as a senior in AP Capstone Research, I am learning about the effects of medical marijuana on the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).  

Outside of school, I furthered my education through taking advantage of the Duke TiP summer program. Duke TiP is a summer program run by Duke University where students who score extremely well on the SAT as middle schoolers are able to take college classes at different universities throughout the summers of their middle school and high school years.  I took advantage of this opportunity twice.  First, I went to Trinity University in San Antonio to expand my horizons and learn more about debate.  However, once I was done exploring, I decided I wanted to go into neuroscience.  This led me to take an Abnormal Psychology class at Duke University’s West Campus.  This class opened my eyes to the interaction between neuroscience and mental health, mental illness, and personality.  Years later, I am currently continuing my education outside of school as an intern at the University of Texas Dallas Center for Brain Health.  Through this internship, I have been able to see different aspects of neuroscience including brain pattern testing, virtual reality therapy, and longitudinal research studies.  With this background, I have positioned myself to be accepted by top neuroscience programs throughout the nation.  So far, I have been accepted to the neuroscience department of University of Southern California, the University of Virginia, the University of Texas, and Southern Methodist University, as well as the chemistry department at University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.  

It is with this passion for neuroscience driven by my family and passion for education driven by internal motivation that I will set out to conquer my career objectives.  My educational aspirations consist of acquiring a bachelor’s degree in a biological or health science that would assist me in pursuing a medical career as a neuroscience researcher.  I decided to attain a career as a researcher since my passion has always been assisting others and trying to improve their quality of life.  After obtaining my Masters and my PhD, I plan to become a professor at a prestigious university and continue performing lab research on cognitive disorders.  I am particularly interested in disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  In the lab, I hope to find different therapies and medications to help treat the 3.5 million people around the world suffering from ASD.  Furthermore, I want to contribute back to underserved populations that struggle because they do not have as much access to medical assistance as other privileged groups.  As such, I hope to do a part of my research in less developed or developing Spanish-speaking countries. This will also allow me to pursue my love of Spanish while pursuing my love of neuroscience.  I think that following such a career path will provide me the opportunity to learn about the medical needs of the autistic community and improve their quality of health.  Furthermore, I hope to train a new generation of students to strive to research and make comparable discoveries.  Whether it be through virtual reality labs or new drug discoveries, I believe that research leads to innovation which leads to a brighter future. 

This student does a great job of making themself appear competent and dedicated to the field of neuroscience. This is primarily because they provided tangible evidence of how they have pursued their dedication in the past—through their AP Capstone courses, their Abnormal Psychology class at Duke TiP, and their internship at UTD. There is no doubt in the mind of a reader that this student is high-achieving. 

This student also engages successfully with a past-future trajectory, where they end with a vision of how they will continue to use neuroscience in the future. This helps the review committee see what they are investing in and the ways that their money will go to good use.

This student has two major areas for improvement. As we have said, the purpose of a personal statement is for a student to humanize themself to a review committee. This student struggles to depict themself separately from their academic achievements. A solution to this would be for the student to establish a theme towards the beginning of their essay that relates to both their values as a human and their achievements.

At the beginning of the essay, the student explores how their interest in neuroscience began. They explain their interest through the following sentences: “During this time, my love for neuroscience was sparked as I began to research her condition and, then, other neurocognitive conditions” and “Once again, with this illness came a lot of research on my part — research that encouraged me to pursue my dreams of exploring neuroscience.” The student made the great decision to tell the backstory of their interest, but they described their research in very mundane and redundant terms. Instead, they could have focused on their value of intellectual curiosity as a magnetic force that encouraged them to research their mother and sister’s ailments. Curiosity, then, could serve as a value-related thematic throughline to taking AP Capstone classes, taking college courses during the summer that weren’t required, and interning before even graduating high school.

A second area for improvement would be avoiding statistics. As the student identifies their valedictorian status and the number of AP classes they have taken, they might turn away certain personalities on a review committee by appearing braggy. Even further, these statistics are a waste of space. The review committee already has access to this information. These words distract from the major theme of the essay and would have been better used to humanize the student.

Throughout my academic career, I have been an avid scholar, constantly pushing myself towards ambitious goals. I held and continue to hold myself to a high standard, enrolling myself in rigorous curriculum, including Honors and Advanced Placement courses to stretch my mental potential. During my junior year of high school, I took four AP tests, two on the same day, and earned the AP Scholar with Honor Award. Additionally, I received the Letter of Commendation for the PSAT/NMSQT, and qualified for Rotary Top 100 Students both my freshman and senior year, a sign of my commitment to my studies. However, school has not been all about having the best GPA for me; beyond the numbers, I have a deep drive to learn which motivates me to do well academically. I truly enjoy learning new things, whether it be a new essay style or a math theorem. I always give each class my best effort and try my hardest on every assignment. My teachers have noticed this as well, and I have received school Lancer Awards and Student of the Month recognitions as a result. It is a major goal of mine to continue to aspire towards a high level of achievement regarding future educational and occupational endeavors; I plan on continuing this level of dedication throughout my educational career and implementing the skills I have learned and will learn into my college experience and beyond.

This fall, I will begin attending the University of California Los Angeles as an English major. I chose this major because I am fascinated by written language, especially its ability to convey powerful messages and emotions. I also enjoy delving into the works of other authors to analyze specific components of their writing to discover the meaning behind their words. In particular, I cannot wait to begin in-depth literary criticism and learn new stylistic techniques to add more depth to my writing. Furthermore, I recently went to UCLA’s Bruin Day, an event for incoming freshmen, where I was exposed to many different extracurriculars, some of which really piqued my interest. I plan on joining the Writing Success Program, where I can help students receive free writing help, and Mock Trial, where I can debate issues with peers in front of a real judge. The latter, combined with a strong writing background from my undergraduate English studies will be extremely beneficial because I plan to apply to law school after my undergraduate degree. As of now, my career goal is to become a civil rights lawyer, to stand up for those who are discriminated against and protect minority groups to proliferate equality.

As a lawyer, I wish to utilize legislation to ameliorate the plight of the millions of Americans who feel prejudice and help them receive equity in the workplace, society, and so on. Though this seems a daunting task, I feel that my work ethic and past experience will give me the jumpstart I need to establish myself as a successful lawyer and give a voice to those who are often unheard in today’s legal system. I have been a Girl Scout for over a decade and continually participate in community service for the homeless, elderly, veterans, and more. My most recent project was the Gold Award, which I conducted in the Fullerton School District. I facilitated over ten workshops where junior high students taught elementary pupils STEM principles such as density and aerodynamics via creative activities like building aluminum boats and paper airplanes. I also work at Kumon, a tutoring center, where I teach students to advance their academic success. I love my job, and helping students from local schools reach their potential fills me with much pride.

Both being a Girl Scout and working at Kumon have inspired me to help those in need, contributing significantly to my desire to become a lawyer and aid others. My extracurriculars have allowed me to gain a new perspective on both learning and teaching, and have solidified my will to help the less fortunate. In college, I hope to continue to gain knowledge and further develop my leadership skills, amassing qualities that will help me assist others. I plan to join multiple community service clubs, such as UCLA’s local outreach programs that directly aid residents of Los Angeles. I want to help my fellow pupils as well, and plan on volunteering at peer tutoring and peer editing programs on campus. After college, during my career, I want to use legal tactics to assist the underdog and take a chance on those who are often overlooked for opportunities. I wish to represent those that are scared to seek out help or cannot afford it. Rather than battling conflict with additional conflict, I want to implement peaceful but strong, efficient tactics that will help make my state, country, and eventually the world more welcoming to people of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. These goals are close to my heart and therefore I will be as diligent as I am passionate about them. My perseverance and love for learning and community service drive my ambition in both education and life as a whole, and the drive to make the world a better place is one that I will carry with me for my entire life.

This student emphasizes two values in this essay: hard work and community service. These are values that go together nicely, and definitely make sense with this student’s end goal of becoming a civil rights lawyer! That said, some changes could be made to the way the student presents their values that would make their personal statement more convincing and engaging.

Structurally, instead of using a past-future trajectory, this student starts by explaining their academic achievements, then explains their career goals, then explains their history of community service, then explains their future desires for community service. This structure loses the reader. Instead, the student should have started with either the past or the future. 

This could look like 1) identifying their career goals, 2) explaining that hard work and a commitment to community service are necessary to get there, and 3) explaining that they aren’t worried because of their past commitment to hard work and community service. Or it could look like 1) providing examples of their hard work and community service in the past, then 2) explaining how those values will help them achieve their career goals.

Additionally, like with our other example, this student shows a heavy investment in statistics and spouting off accomplishments. This can be unappealing. Unfortunately, even when the student recognizes that they are doing this, writing “beyond the numbers, I have a deep drive to learn which motivates me to do well academically. I truly enjoy learning new things, whether it be a new essay style or a math theorem,” they continue on to cite their achievements, writing “My teachers have noticed this as well, and I have received school Lancer Awards and Student of the Month recognitions as a result.” They say they are going beyond the numbers, but they don’t go beyond the awards. They don’t look inward. One way to fix this would be to make community service the theme around which the essay operates, supplementing with statistics in ways that advance the image of the student as dedicated to community service.

Finally, this student would be more successful if they varied their sentence structure. While a small-scale autobiography can be good, if organized, every sentence should not begin with ‘I.’ The essay still needs to be engaging or the review committee might stop reading.

Feedback is ultimately any writer’s best source of improvement! To get your personal statement edited for free, use our Peer Review Essay Tool . With this tool, other students can tell you if your scholarship essay is effective and help you improve your essay so that you can have the best chances of gaining those extra funds!

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How to Write a Biosketch

How to write a biosketch, what is a biographical sketch.

BioSketches are a great tool to document an individual's qualifications, professional experience, and academic journey. Think of your BioSketch as a response to the question: “Tell me about yourself?” 

Below are general tips on how to write your BioSketch, as well as step-by-step guides and examples of BioSketches for students ranging from first year students, transfer students, and students preparing to graduate. For additional help with your BioSketch or general questions, email us at [email protected] .

General Tips

  • Write in the third person. This means that instead of using “I” statements, use “he/she/they” statements. 
  • The information you include in your BioSketch is unique to you and your circumstances. While your BioSketch may look different from the examples below, be sure to include the important general information outlined in the paragraph bullet points that fit you best.
  • Be sure to check your BioSketch for spelling, grammar, and sentence flow.

Step-By-Step

Paragraph 1:

  • Where are you from? Where/when did you graduate high school?
  • Did you earn any titles/awards or participate in extracurricular activities?
  • What did you do after high school? Did you go straight to college or enter the work field?

Paragraph 2: 

  • What are you studying at OSU? Did you transfer from another university? Do you hold any degrees? What special achievements or awards have you earned in college?

Step-By-Step Continued 

Paragraph 3: 

  • What work/volunteer experience have you been a part of?
  • What skills did you develop from these experiences?
  • Have you participated in internships or research/lab work?

Paragraph 4: 

  • When are you expected to graduate? What are your education and career interests? 

BioSketch Examples

Benny Beaver is from Corvallis, Oregon. They graduated from Corvallis High School in 2021 with high honors and served as an officer on the school’s Associated Student Body (ASB) where they assisted in various leadership activities like fundraising, public speaking and community outreach. 

Benny started attending Oregon State University in the fall of 2021, and earned the Finley Academic Excellence Scholarship upon enrollment. They are currently in the University Exploratory Studies Program (UESP) where they are taking a variety of courses and exploring all options before declaring a major.

Benny served as a lifeguard for two years, where they received valuable trainings in CPR/AED, basic water rescue, and first aid. Benny developed a passion for the water, as well as an interest in teaching by instructing weekly swim lessons. Working a part-time job while attending high school also taught them skills in communication, time management, and balancing responsibilities.

Benny is expected to graduate in June 2025. They are exploring learning opportunities and careers in education, oceanography, and sports therapy. 

Bernice Beaver is from New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. She graduated from New Westminster Secondary School in 2018 with a Dogwood Diploma and has a Diplôme de fin d'études secondaires en Colombie-Britannique, meaning she is fluent in French. Bernice was named the Career Female Athlete of the Year upon graduation from high school.

Bernice earned an Athletic Scholarship to Oregon State University where she competes for the Women’s Cross Country and Track & Field teams. She is majoring in Sociology and currently works for the university’s Global Community Kitchen as an Event Support Staff where she serves to assist in planning food service for future Experiential Learning & Activities campus events during weekly team meetings.

Bernice completed the URSA Engage program during her second year at Oregon State University where she conducted research to define the barriers faculty face while facilitating undergraduate research experiences. She presented her research at two university-wide undergraduate research symposiums in 2020 and has since been published in Experiential Learning & Teaching in Higher Education. 

Bernice is expected to graduate in June 2022 with a B.A in Sociology. After graduation, she plans on attending graduate school and complete the Master’s of College Student Service Administration Program at Oregon State University. She has a particular interest in the fields of university student affairs and athletics.

Bo Beaver is from Los Angeles, California. They graduated from Venice High School in 2014 as salutatorian and participated in the school’s marching band, where they acted as drum major for two years. After high school, Bo entered the United States Marine Corps (USMC) where they served for four years. 

Prior to attending Oregon State University, Bo attended Central Oregon Community College from September 2020 until June 2022. During this time, they earned an Associate of Science degree in Computer Science with high honors. Bo transferred to OSU-Cascades in September 2022 and is majoring in Computer Science with an option in Software Engineering.

Bo’s service in the USMC taught them important skills and attributes including confidence, self-discipline, teamwork and leadership. Since enrolling at OSU-Cascades, Bo has joined the university’s Tech Club where they hope to network and gain professional skills in the field of computer science among like-minded individuals. Bo has also been accepted into the 2022-2023 URSA Engage program, where they will be engaging in web applications research with Professor X. 

Bo is expected to graduate in June 2024 with a B.S in Computer Science with an option in software engineering. They plan on attending graduate school and pursuing a career in software development.

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Professional bio-writing 101.

how to write biography for scholarship

How to Write a Professional Bio as a College Student.

A well-written bio is a great tool to have in your professional toolkit. Whether for a job application, networking event, or as an introduction for future employers, your bio is a great way to share who you are and highlight your accomplishments. It can also be a great addition to your LinkedIn profile’s “Summary” section.

Depending on your year in college, your biography will vary in length and topics. For example, a senior may have more work or internship experience to write about than a first-year student, and can describe his/her job roles, skills, and professional interests. On the other hand, first-year students could focus their bio on their background, educational goals, and hobbies. In both cases, your bio should craft an engaging narrative that emphasizes your interests and personality.

Bios are written in the third person and are typically one or two paragraphs, depending on your level of experience. Your bio should start with your name and a quick sentence that describes your basic background. This can include your college, year in school, academic focus, and professional interest. Your bio should be brief, concise, and clear.

Establish a Background Story

Highlighting your background will give the reader an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of your personal narrative, which may not be evident on your resume. Also, consider including recent events, such as studying abroad or volunteering. Find a couple of moments in your life that have impacted your identity or interests, and briefly, mention them. This will personalize your bio and help you stand out from your peers.

Explain Your Interests

Next, you will want to elaborate on your interests. For students with a significant amount of professional experience, this will focus more on career goals. If you don’t feel you have enough job experience to write about or are not sure about your professional goals, describe your academic or extracurricular interests. Feel free to add any hobbies that highlight your uniqueness, such as painting, running marathons, or cooking. Remember, your personal biography is an area to describe your personality that is not as easily communicated on your resume.

Emphasize How You Can Add Value

Lastly, you want to end on a high note by emphasizing how you can add value. Depending on where you use this bio, this sentence or two can refer to adding value to a company, team, or event. Highlight your unique talents and skills that would interest your audience. Rather than explicitly stating, “I can add value by…,” share this message subtly. You want your reader to understand that you are a well-rounded individual and professional who can contribute significant knowledge and experience.

There is no order to include all of this information. Play with the format and see what works best for your narrative. Although it can be difficult to summarize your life in one paragraph, this is a useful tool for crafting a positive image of yourself for potential professional networks. Below are two examples:

Example 1 (for first-years and sophomores):

Alison Johnson is finishing her first year at DePaul University where she is interested in business. Although she has yet to declare a major, she’s considering finance or marketing. After watching her parents run a restaurant for years, she knew at a very young age that she also wanted to go into business. In high school, Alison waited tables at the family restaurant during the summer and was fascinated by the many working parts it takes to operate a successful business. From this experience, she learned the value of hard work, efficiency, and communication. In the future, she hopes to continue her parents’ legacy and run her own five-star restaurant in downtown Chicago. Alison spends her spare time singing in her church choir and cooking for friends and family.

Example 2 (for juniors and seniors):

Jared Smith is a senior at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he is majoring in International Studies with a concentration in Latin America. His interest in international development began during the fall semester of 2012 when he had the opportunity to study abroad in Peru. He learned about the inequalities affecting indigenous communities, experienced the Peruvian culture, and became proficient in Spanish. Inspired by this international experience, Jared interned with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, conducting research on food security in Latin America. Jared aspires to pursue a career in international development and write policy for a government agency. When he is not busy reading about current affairs in Latin America, he enjoys playing intramural basketball and training for the Chicago marathon.

More Resources

4 Steps to Writing a Professional Bio, Huffington Post

How to Write a Professional Bio, PROF KRG

6 Must-haves for Writing a Compelling Professional Bio, People Results

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  • How to Write a Scholarship Essay | Template & Example

How to Write a Scholarship Essay | Template & Example

Published on October 11, 2021 by Kirsten Courault . Revised on May 31, 2023.

A good scholarship essay demonstrates the scholarship organization’s values while directly addressing the prompt. If you plan ahead , you can save time by writing one essay for multiple prompts with similar questions.

Table of contents

Apply for a wide variety of scholarships, make a scholarship tracker spreadsheet, tailor your essay to the organization and the prompt, write a focused and relevant personal story, scholarship essay example, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about college application essays.

Scholarships are a type of student financial aid that don’t require repayment. They are awarded based on various factors, including academic merit, financial need, intended major, personal background, or activities and interests.

Like college applications, scholarship applications often require students to submit their grades, standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, and an essay.

A scholarship essay shares your values and qualities in the context of a specific question, such as “How does technology affect your daily life?” or “Who has had the greatest impact on your life?”

Be wary of scholarship scams

While some applications may not require an essay, be wary of scholarship scams that do the following:

  • Guarantee you scholarship money for a fee
  • Claim scholarship information is exclusive to their company
  • Ask for your bank or credit card information to hold the scholarship

Some legitimate companies do charge for releasing comprehensive scholarship lists or creating a tailored list of scholarship opportunities based on your profile.

However, you can always discover scholarship opportunities for free through your school counselor, community network, or an online search.

Many students focus on well-known, large scholarship opportunities, which are usually very competitive. To maximize your chance of success, invest time in applying for a wide variety of scholarships: national and local, as well as big and small award amounts. There are also scholarships for international students .

In addition to charitable foundation and corporate scholarships, you should consider applying for institutional scholarships at your prospective universities, which can award money based on your application’s strength, your financial situation, and your demonstrated interest in the school.

Check with your guidance counselor, local organizations, community network, or prospective schools’ financial aid offices for scholarship opportunities. It’s a good idea to start applying as early as your junior year and continue throughout your senior year.

Choose the right scholarships for you

Choose scholarships with missions and essay topics that match your background, experiences, and interests. If the scholarship topic is meaningful to you, it will be easier for you to write an authentic and compelling essay.

Don’t shy away from applying for local scholarships with small dollar amounts. Even a few hundred dollars can help you pay for books.

Local scholarships may be more tailored to your community, background, and activities, so they’re likely more relevant to you. Fewer students apply for these scholarships, so you have less competition and a higher chance of success.

Some places to look for local scholarships include

  • Civic organizations, such as the Rotary Club, Lions Club, etc.
  • Your church, mosque, synagogue, or place of worship
  • Community groups, such as the YMCA
  • Ethnicity-based organizations
  • Your local library or local small businesses
  • Organizations related to your intended major
  • Your city or town
  • Your school district
  • Unions, such as SEIU, the Teamsters, CWA, etc.
  • Your employer or your parents’ employers
  • Banks, credit unions, and local financial institutions

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

While researching scholarship opportunities, create a scholarship tracker spreadsheet to keep track of the following:

  • Scholarship amounts
  • Required application materials

You can use our free Google Sheets template to track your scholarship applications.

Scholarship application tracker template

You can also include scholarship essay prompts in your college essay tracker sheet . By grouping or color-code overlapping essay prompts, you can plan to write a single essay for multiple scholarships. Sometimes, you can also reuse or adapt your main college essay .

Even if you’re adapting another essay, it’s important to make sure your essay directly addresses the prompt, stays within the word count limit , and demonstrates the organization’s values. The scholarship committee will be able to tell if you reuse an essay that doesn’t quite respond to the prompt, so be sure to tailor it to the questions asked.

Research each organization

Before writing, research the scholarship organization’s mission and reason for awarding the scholarship. Learning more about the organization can help you select an appropriate topic and relevant story.

While you should tailor your essay to the organization’s values, maintain your authentic voice. Never use false or exaggerated stories. If the organization’s values don’t align with yours or you can’t brainstorm a relevant story for the scholarship, continue searching for other scholarship opportunities to find a more appropriate one for you.

After researching the organization, identify a specific personal experience that embodies its values and exemplifies why you will be a successful student.

Choose a story with the following criteria:

  • Responds to the prompt
  • Demonstrates the organization’s values
  • Includes an authentic story
  • Focuses on you and your experience, not someone else’s

A good scholarship essay is not

  • A resume of your achievements
  • A lengthy opinion piece about the essay topic
  • An essay featuring a negative tone that puts down others

If appropriate, you can briefly address how the scholarship money will help you achieve your educational goals. You should also end with a brief thank-you.

Take a look at the full essay example below. Hover over the underlined parts to read explanations of why they work.

Prompt: Describe how working for Chelsea’s Chicken restaurant has developed leadership skills that will help you succeed in college. Give specific examples of leadership characteristics that you have exhibited during your employment with us.

As a nervous 16-year-old, I walked into Chelsea’s Chicken for my first day of work determined to make enough money to put gas in my car and buy pizza on the weekends. My only previous job was mowing my neighbors’ lawns when they were on vacation, so I had no idea what to expect. I was a bit intimidated by my new responsibilities, especially handling money and helping disgruntled customers.

However, it didn’t take me long to learn my way around the cash register and successfully address customer complaints. One day, Roger, the store manager, asked me if I wanted to join Chelsea’s Chicken Leadership Training Initiative. He said he saw leadership potential in me because of my attitude with the customers and my enthusiasm for learning new job responsibilities. It surprised me because I had never thought of myself as a leader, but I quickly agreed, and Roger handed me a three-ring binder that was thicker than my math and science textbooks put together! He told me to take it home and read over it during the following week.

In that binder, I discovered that being a leader means taking the initiative, especially when the job is undesirable. One week later, I got to practice that idea when a little kid threw up in the bathroom and missed the toilet. It smelled terrible, but I stepped forward and told Roger that I would clean it up. My coworkers thought I was crazy, but I started to believe in my leadership potential.

That night as we closed the store, Roger pulled me aside in the parking lot and told me that he could tell that I had been studying the manual. He wanted to give me more responsibility, along with a dollar-per-hour pay raise. I was surprised because I had been working there for only a couple of months, but his encouragement helped me make a connection: good leadership helps other people, and it often is rewarded. I was determined to experience more of both.

Within a month, I was ready to take the Team Leader exam, which mattered because I would receive a promotion and a much bigger raise if I passed. But, when I got to work, two of the scheduled team members had called in sick. We were noticeably short-handed, and our customers weren’t happy about it.

I walked back to the lockers, put on my vest and hat, and took my place behind an open register. Customers immediately moved into my line to place their orders. Roger looked at me with surprise and asked, “Did you forget that you’re testing tonight?” I responded, “No, sir—but what’s the use of taking a leadership test if you aren’t going to lead in real life?” Roger smiled at me and nodded.

He stayed late that night after we closed so that I could leave early and still take the test. I noticed that Roger was always staying late, helping employees learn new skills. His example taught me that leaders take the initiative to develop other leaders. He gave me a clear picture of what shared leadership looks like, making room for others to grow and excel. When I asked him where he learned to do that, he said, “From the same leadership manual I gave you!”

Chelsea’s Chicken has offered me so much more than a paycheck. Because of Roger’s example, I have learned to take the initiative to care for my family and friends, such as being the first to do the dishes without my mom asking or volunteering to pick up my friend for our SAT prep course. Now, as I prepare to enter college, I have confidence in my leadership ability. I know I’m signing up for a challenging major—Biology, Pre-Med—yet I also know that Chelsea’s Chicken has helped me to develop the perseverance required to complete my studies successfully.

If you want to know more about academic writing , effective communication , or parts of speech , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Academic writing

  • Writing process
  • Transition words
  • Passive voice
  • Paraphrasing

 Communication

  • How to end an email
  • Ms, mrs, miss
  • How to start an email
  • I hope this email finds you well
  • Hope you are doing well

 Parts of speech

  • Personal pronouns
  • Conjunctions

A scholarship essay requires you to demonstrate your values and qualities while answering the prompt’s specific question.

After researching the scholarship organization, identify a personal experience that embodies its values and exemplifies how you will be a successful student.

Invest time in applying for various scholarships , especially local ones with small dollar amounts, which are likely easier to win and more reflective of your background and interests. It will be easier for you to write an authentic and compelling essay if the scholarship topic is meaningful to you.

You can find scholarships through your school counselor, community network, or an internet search.

You can start applying for scholarships as early as your junior year. Continue applying throughout your senior year.

Yes, but make sure your essay directly addresses the prompt, respects the word count , and demonstrates the organization’s values.

If you plan ahead, you can save time by writing one scholarship essay for multiple prompts with similar questions. In a scholarship tracker spreadsheet, you can group or color-code overlapping essay prompts; then, write a single essay for multiple scholarships. Sometimes, you can even reuse or adapt your main college essay .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Courault, K. (2023, May 31). How to Write a Scholarship Essay | Template & Example. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/college-essay/scholarship-essay/

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An Example on How to Write an Autobiography for a Scholarship

What goes into writing an autobiography for a scholarship? How do you make it worth a read? With the help of the example provided below, you can learn how to write one for yourself.

Autobiography Example for Scholarship

Funding a college education is difficult for most, which is why attaining a scholarship becomes important for students. However, not everyone is eligible for a scholarship, and a lot needs to be done to get that help with funding an education that will simply ease your worries a little. One such thing is proving why only you are eligible for that scholarship by providing an autobiography that explains your abilities and your worth for this funding. Now, what goes into a good autobiographical essay for a scholarship? Here, we provide you with an example that will help you get that scholarship.

How to Write an Autobiography for Scholarship

When writing your autobiography, focus on what your grade sheets, letters of recommendation, and other additional documents you have given for your admission do not focus on. This is your chance to prove your suitability for a scholarship. Your transcripts already reflect your GPA, and your letters of recommendation already show what others believe you are capable of. In an autobiography, you can show what you believe you are capable of. Unless relevant, don’t mention where you grew up, which school you went to, or how your friends changed your life. Only mention experiences as relevant as they can get to your cause and directly improve your chances of getting the scholarship. After taking a look at the example provided below, you should be able to get an idea of how you would like to go about writing your own.

As you can see, the sample focuses on the person’s belief in herself and what she would do with the education that would be funded with the scholarship. Similarly, ideally even you should focus on the same subject and ensure that you definitely are a worthy candidate for the scholarship. As long as you do your best, you can leave the rest to the discretion of the scholarship committee. Good luck!

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50 Attractive Bio Examples for Students

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Bio Examples for Students

Do you feel intimidated when it comes to writing a bio as a student? It’s understandable – after all, you’re still growing your skills and may not have much professional experience yet. But don’t worry, creating an engaging bio doesn’t have to be a lengthy and detailed process.

In fact, a few short sentences can pack just as much punch. Check out these inspiring examples of student bios to get some ideas flowing.

For High School Students:

Meet John Smith – a talented high school senior with a passion for the written word. As the editor of his school’s newspaper, he fearlessly delves into the latest stories and issues. But that’s not all – John is also an avid reader and writer, always eager to explore new literary worlds and discover fresh perspectives.

His dedication to academic excellence has earned him a spot in the esteemed National Honor Society. With his curious spirit and unwavering drive, John is sure to make a meaningful impact wherever his literary journey takes him.

For College Students:

Meet Jane Doe, a dynamic junior at the prestigious University of California, Berkeley. Jane is a double major in economics and computer science, driven by her insatiable passion for solving the world’s toughest economic challenges.

She’s also a seasoned member of the college debate team, where she hones her critical thinking and communication skills. Whether it’s through her academic pursuits or extracurricular activities, Jane is constantly striving to make a positive impact on the world around her.

For Graduate Students:

Meet Adam Jones, a brilliant PhD student who is paving the way for a cleaner, more sustainable future through his groundbreaking research. Based in the esteemed Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington, Adam is dedicated to pushing the boundaries of energy storage through the development of innovative materials.

When he’s not in the lab, this accomplished young scientist can be found tinkling the ivories on his beloved piano or conquering the great outdoors with exhilarating hikes through the majestic mountains. Join us as we delve into the fascinating world of Adam Jones and discover the passion, curiosity and creativity that fuels his remarkable achievements.

For Professional Students:

Meet Mary Smith, a driven medical student who has set her sights on making a difference in the world through healthcare. With a burning passion for aiding others, she’s focused on specializing in family medicine to provide the best possible care for her patients. But her compassion doesn’t stop there – in her free time, Mary volunteers at a local hospital, where she selflessly gives back to underserved communities by offering essential healthcare services. Her commitment to helping others is truly inspiring.

Sample Bio Examples for Students

Whether you’re a student applying to universities or just starting out in your career, it’s important to have a Bio that’s reflective of you. Here are some sample bio examples to get you started.

Example 1-5:

1 . Sarah is a committed and motivated student actively pursuing a degree in journalism. Her passion for storytelling and uncovering new perspectives has not only led her to attain valuable experience through an internship at a local newspaper, but has also driven her to establish her own successful blog. In addition to her academic pursuits, Sarah enjoys spending her free time hiking in the mountains and playing guitar.

2. David is a curious student with a passion for learning about different cultures. He is fluent in four languages and has lived in three different countries during his teenage years. While completing his degree in international relations, David volunteers as a tutor for refugees and asylum seekers. In his free time, he likes to cook traditional dishes from around the world. 3. Emma is a creative artist who makes magic with her paintbrushes. Her art style draws inspiration from nature and whimsical elements. Currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in fine arts, Emma has been featured in several art exhibitions, and her artwork has been sold to collectors around the world. Outside the classroom, you can find her exploring museums and galleries. 4. Jonathan is a tech-savvy student with a fascination for coding. He is currently studying computer science and has already built his own mobile game app. Apart from coding, Jonathan enjoys exploring new technologies and experimenting with an Arduino in his spare time. He hopes to start his tech startup after graduation. 5. Rachel is a highly motivated student-athlete who demonstrates excellence both academically and athletically. As a standout midfielder on the varsity team, she has been recognized with multiple athletic scholarships. Additionally, Rachel is a distinguished straight-A student and distinguishes herself as the captain of the school’s debate team. During her leisure time, she enjoys engaging with intellectually stimulating materials such as books and documentaries.

Example 6-10:

6. Michael is a highly impressive and engaging student with a strong dedication to public speaking. His major of study is communication studies and he has achieved numerous national accolades for his exceptional persuasive speeches. Additionally, Michael is actively involved in theater productions and has displayed his talent for acting in several plays. Outside of his academic pursuits, he enjoys the cerebral challenge of playing chess and embarking on new travel adventures. 7. Emily is a caring and compassionate student who’s always there to lend a helping hand. She is pursuing a degree in nursing and volunteers at a children’s hospital every week. Emily is also a talented musician and plays the piano beautifully. In her free time, she likes to read classic novels and watch romantic comedies. 8. Jason is a brilliant student with a natural talent for mathematics. He is currently studying applied mathematics and has already published several research papers in academic journals. Jason is also a skilled pianist and has won several national competitions. Outside of class, he likes to play soccer and volunteer at a local soup kitchen. 9. Olivia is a creative writer with a vivid imagination. Pursuing a degree in English literature, Olivia has won several writing contests and published several short stories. Aside from her writing, Olivia enjoys painting and has recently started her own Etsy store selling her artwork. She loves spending time at the beach and collecting seashells. 10. Kevin is a highly committed and socially-aware student who is keen on creating a positive impact on the world. He is pursuing a degree in social work and has garnered extensive knowledge on social issues through his involvement with diverse non-profit organizations. Kevin dedicates his time to advocating for social justice, and he also volunteers at a homeless shelter in his free time. Additionally, he enjoys playing basketball as a recreational activity.

Example 10-15:

11. Lisa is a dedicated sophomore pursuing a degree in Zoology at XYZ University. She possesses a strong passion for conservation and has actively engaged with a local non-governmental organization for the last two years to aid in the protection of a wildlife reserve in the area. Lisa’s commitment to animal welfare is also evident through her volunteer work with the local Humane Society. As a member of the Student Environmental Action Coalition, she continues to champion environmental causes and spearhead efforts to protect the planet.

12. Emily holds a degree in History from XYZ University and has gained valuable experience as a research assistant over the course of the past year. She is proficient in working with both written and oral historical sources. In addition, Emily is an active member of the Student Environmental Action Coalition and is currently pursuing her master’s thesis on the historiography of environmentalism in Latin America.

13. John Smith is a third-year business major at XYZ University with a concentration in accounting. He is a member of the school’s accounting club and has completed internships at two top accounting firms. 14. Jane Doe is a senior English major at ABC College. She has been published in two literary magazines and was awarded a literary scholarship for her work. She hopes to pursue a career in publishing after graduation. 15. Michael Johnson is a sophomore biology major at LMN University. He spent his freshman year conducting research with a biology professor and presented his findings at a national conference.

Example 16-20:

16. Sarah Lee is a junior communications major at DEF College. She is the public relations coordinator for the student government association and has completed internships with several local media outlets. 17. David Williams is a senior psychology major at GHI University. He has volunteered for several mental health organizations and is passionate about advocating for individuals with mental illness. 18. Amanda Rodriguez is a third-year nursing student at JKL College. She has completed clinical rotations in pediatric and adult nursing and plans to become a pediatric nurse after graduation. 19. Ryan Chen is a senior computer science major at MNO University. He has designed and programmed several mobile apps and was awarded an internship at a major tech company. 20. Samantha Green is a sophomore marketing major at PQR College. She is the social media coordinator for the school’s marketing club and has completed a marketing internship at a fashion company.

Example 21-25:

21. Eric Davis is a proficient third-year architecture student who has gained valuable experience in designing community centers and residential buildings. He is an active member of the architecture club at STU University.

22. Lauren Baker is an accomplished junior art major at UVW College. Her artistic work has been showcased in a local gallery, and she has been recognized with a scholarship for her creative endeavors. She serves as the treasurer of the student art club.

23. Jared Patel is a capable senior finance major at XYZ University. He has completed internships at two major investment firms and has co-founded a personal finance blog.

24. Olivia Lee is a promising sophomore journalism major at ABC College. She has contributed to the school’s newspaper and is a part of the student.

25. Ethan Nguyen is a junior music major at LMN University. He has performed in several school concerts and hopes to become a music teacher after graduation.

Example 26 – 30:

26. Kristen Kim is a senior political science major at DEF College. She has interned for a state senator and is a member of the school’s political science club. 27. Mark Perez is a third-year engineering student at GHI University. He has completed design projects for a solar-powered car and a water filtration system, and is a member of the school’s engineering society. 28. Emily Sanchez is a sophomore education major at JKL College. She has volunteered at local schools and is passionate about promoting equitable access to education. 29. Jason Chen is an accomplished senior economics major at MNO University. He has demonstrated his expertise as a financial analyst for a nonprofit organization and has gained valuable experience through internships at major investment banks.

30. Rachel Kim is a dedicated third-year environmental science major at PQR College. She has conducted extensive research on the impact of pollution on marine life and is an active member of the school’s esteemed environmental club.

Example 31 – 35:

31. Andy Lee is a talented junior theater major at STU University. He has showcased his artistic talents in several notable school productions and aspires to pursue a successful career in acting upon graduation.

32. Christina Davis is a committed senior sociology major at UVW College. She has wholeheartedly devoted her time to volunteering for several.

33. Jane Smith is a senior at XYZ University majoring in Marketing. She is a proactive and innovative student with a passion for creativity and strategic thinking. Jane has completed multiple internships and projects in the field and is determined to establish herself as a successful marketer. 34. John Doe is a dedicated Biology major at ABC University. He has a keen interest in research and has already conducted several research projects in the field of ecology, biodiversity, and conservation. John has published his research findings in various scientific journals and aims to pursue a career in academia. 35. Mary Johnson is an Electrical Engineering major at LMN College. She has a strong background in coding and programming and has worked on numerous coding projects both on and off-campus. Mary aims to be at the forefront of technology advancement and is determined to contribute her skills to the development of cutting-edge technology.

Example 36 – 40:

36. William Brown is a Finance major at PQR University. He has a keen interest in financial analysis and has completed multiple internships in investment banking firms. William is determined to apply his knowledge and skills in the financial sector and contribute to the growth and success of companies. 37. Elizabeth Taylor is a Creative Writing major at XYZ College. She is an avid reader and writer with a passion for storytelling. Elizabeth has had her creative work published in various literary magazines and journals and aims to become a successful novelist. 38. David Park is an Industrial Design major at ABC University. He is a creative and innovative student with a passion for product design and consumer behavior. David has completed multiple design projects and internships and aims to create new and exciting products that improve people’s lives. 39. Sarah Lee is a Computer Science major at LMN College. She is a skilled programmer and has won several coding competitions both on and off-campus. Sarah aspires to create innovative and cutting-edge software solutions that help businesses run more efficiently.

40. Michael Nguyen is a Psychology major at PQR University. He has a strong background in research and has conducted several research projects in the field of cognitive psychology. Michael aims to pursue a career in academia and contribute to the development of scientific knowledge.

Example 41 – 50:

41. Emily Davis is a Graphic Design major at XYZ College. She is a creative and detail-oriented student with a passion for visual communication. Emily has worked on several design projects and internships and aims to create visually striking and effective branding solutions. 42. Jack Smith is a Mechanical Engineering major at ABC University. He is a skilled problem solver with a passion for innovative design solutions. Jack has completed several engineering projects and internships and aims to contribute to the development of cutting-edge technology that advances society. 43. Emma Chen is an Accounting major at LMN College. She has a keen eye for detail and a passion for numbers. Emma has completed multiple accounting internships and projects and aims to become a successful CPA. 44. James Nguyen is a Biology major at PQR University. He is a dedicated student with a strong interest in genetics and biotechnology. James has conducted multiple research projects and aims to pursue a career in genetic engineering. 45. Ashley Garcia is an Architecture major at XYZ College. She is a creative and detail-oriented student with a passion for sustainable design. Ashley has completed several architecture projects and internships and aims to create innovative and Eco-friendly spaces. 46. Alex Brown is a Political Science major at ABC University. He is a critical thinker with a passion for studying government and public policy. Alex has completed multiple political internships and aims to pursue a career in public service. 47. Rachel Lee is a Nutrition and Dietetics major at LMN College. She is a passionate and knowledgeable student with a strong interest in healthy eating habits. Rachel has completed multiple nutrition projects and internships and aims to become a successful registered dietitian. 48. Tyler Davis is a Civil Engineering major at PQR University. He is a skilled problem solver with a passion for infrastructure design. Tyler has completed multiple civil engineering projects and internships and aims to contribute to the development of sustainable infrastructure. 49. Samantha Nguyen is an Environmental Science major at XYZ College. She is a creative and detail-oriented student with a passion for environmental conservation. Samantha has completed several environmental projects and internships and aims to create innovative and sustainable solutions for environmental issues. 50. John Kim is a Philosophy major at ABC University. He is a critical thinker with a passion for studying morality and ethics. John has completed multiple philosophy projects and aims to pursue a career in academia.

Crafting a bio that perfectly showcases your unique set of skills, interests, and experiences can be a daunting task. But fret not, as with these expert examples, you can easily create a bio that not only highlights your accomplishments but also captivates your audience. From detailing the awards and honors you’ve earned to highlighting the clubs and organizations you’re a part of, every aspect of your life deserves to be beautifully depicted in your bio. So, let’s dive in and learn how to make your bio a true masterpiece. Crafting a compelling bio can make all the difference in landing your dream job or making a lasting impression. To create a standout bio, your focus should be on highlighting your most impressive accomplishments, awards, and experiences that are relevant to the job you’re applying for.

Make sure to include any pertinent job titles, internships, and volunteer positions you’ve held, and then narrow your list down to the most impactful information. Captivate your audience with a concise, professional narrative that showcases your unique talents and sets you apart from the crowd.

Writing a compelling bio is a key step in presenting yourself to the world. While there are a few essential rules to follow, the beauty is in how you paint your picture. Start by putting your name and contact information front and center, so potential contacts can easily get in touch.

Then, capture their attention with a snappy paragraph (or two) that showcases your unique background, skills, and accomplishments. Think of it as a snapshot of who you are and what you can bring to the table. As you wrap up, don’t forget to sprinkle in those little extras that make you stand out, like your areas of expertise or fluency in different languages.

Why Writing Bio Examples for Students?

Crafting a compelling bio can be a daunting task for students. It’s a crucial element of their professional development, but where do they even begin? That’s where bio examples come in. Offering inspiring examples of bios can help students grasp the essential components, while providing a creative spark to craft their own unique story. With engaging bio examples, students can confidently present themselves to potential employers or clients, standing out in a sea of applicants. Let’s unlock the power of bio writing and unleash the potential of our future leaders.

Crafting a compelling bio can be a challenging task, but it’s essential to showcase your authenticity and unique traits. Your bio should reveal your educational background, work experience, and career aspirations while exhibiting your personality. As an educator, you can guide students by offering them bio examples that will inspire them to unleash their creativity and write their own compelling story. By sharing your expertise, you can empower them to express themselves confidently and make a lasting impression.

Tips for Writing Bio Examples for Students :

Crafting a compelling bio example can be the key to unlocking exciting career opportunities. However, it can be a daunting task to create a bio that not only showcases your accomplishments but also captivates your audience. We’ve got you covered with some expert tips to help you craft a bio example that will inspire and leave a lasting impression on your target audience, whether you’re a student or seasoned professional. So, let’s dive in and get started!

1. Start with a strong opener. Capture your reader’s attention with a powerful opener that captures your unique selling proposition (USP). For example; if you’re a writer, start by telling the reader what you’re good at. If you’re a teacher, start by telling the reader what you’re passionate about.

2. Write about your experience. Start by telling the reader about your experience and how it has helped you. Share examples of what you’ve written, what you’ve done, and what you know.

3. Are you tired of reading boring and impersonal content? Then it’s time to get personal! Share your unique story and let your readers get to know the real you. Talk about the people and things that light up your life, as well as those that get under your skin.

With anecdotes that are both relatable and entertaining, your readers will feel like they’re chatting with an old friend. So go ahead, open up and let your personality shine through in your writing!

4. When it comes to writing, examples can be the key to truly engaging your reader. Don’t hold back – including relevant and illustrative examples can demonstrate your skill and expertise in a way that mere words can’t match.

By weaving in concrete examples, you can show your reader that you’re not just talking the talk, but walking the writing walk. So don’t shy away from including examples – they can be the secret weapon in your writing arsenal.

5. End with a call to action. Share a motivation or a challenge for the reader. For example, tell the reader what you want them to do next.

Crafting a captivating bio can be daunting, but fear not! With these expert tips, your bio is guaranteed to captivate and inspire your students. Say goodbye to blending in with the rest and hello to making a lasting impression.

How to Write a Great Bio for Students ?

Whether you’re applying to colleges, scholarships, or just want to make a good first impression, you’ll want to write a great bio. A bio is the first impression your reader will have of you and it can make or break your application. There are a few things you should keep in mind when writing your bio: – Make sure your language is easy to read. – Use active and positive verbs. – Be concise. – Use a standard font and typeface.

Here are some tips on how to write a great bio example for students:

-Use your school’s name and the year you graduated in your bio. – State your major and any honors or awards you’ve received. – Write about something you’re passionate about and why it’s important to you. – Include your goals for the future and how you plan to achieve them. – Let your personality shine through. – Use action verbs and include a photo.

Thank you for reading our blog post about bio examples for students. We hope that our examples have inspired you to write your own bio and to be proud of who you are. We know that you can do great things, and we are here to support you every step of the way. Take a look at our other blog posts for more inspiration, and we hope to see you soon. 6 Graphic Design Questions for Students

8 Distinctive Example of Music Artist Bio

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  • Scholarships

How to Write a Biographical Sketch for a Scholarship? 

  • How To , Questionnaire , Uncategorized

How to write a biographical sketch for scholarship

Scholarships provide financial assistance to the students and cover the cost of higher education. It provides opportunities to students who are unable to enroll in higher education. To secure a scholarship, students have to submit a biographical sketch. A biographical sketch is known as a biography. It consists of a summary of an individual’s life including background, education, achievement, career, experience, and other important details. It provides a life story of an individual which is relevant in various contexts. The scholarship committee evaluates the candidates based on their biographical sketches. They verify professional details, personal details, academic achievements, and other skills. The length and depth of the biographical sketches may vary depending on the use of the sketch. For the scholarship application, the biography sketch may be relatively short as compared to other professional conferences. The professional presentation conferences require detailed information for which students have to submit a detailed biography sketch including expertise and accomplishments. Here, we will discuss all the relevant points that you should include while writing a biographical sketch for scholarships. The most important points and highlights of the biographical sketch are mentioned below.

How to Write a Biographical Sketch for a Scholarship?

Nowadays, scholarships require biographical sketches along with the scholarship application as it helps the scholarship committee in the smooth evaluation of the candidate. Biographical sketches are considered a comprehensive and concise way to introduce yourself in front of the scholarship committee. You can include any point that highlights your character and abilities. The strategy that you have to adopt while writing is mentioned below.

Points to Consider While Writing the Biographical Sketch

  • Introduction: You should start a biography and sketch with your introduction. You can use any phrase and a compelling statement that describes you and grabs the attention of the reader. Your introduction makes you an ideal candidate for the scholarship. So,  try to write it effectively. Then mention your name, your preferred field of study, background, educational status, etc. Show your dedication towards the studies that made the provider believe you are a deserving candidate. You should wind up your introduction paragraph in 150 to 200 words.
  • Background: You should highlight your financial background, your family background, your educational background, your career goals, etc. If you face any major challenges then highlight that. Mention the occupation of your family or parents, it describes your financial condition to some extent. Some scholarships are awarded based on financial need. So, highlight your circumstances because it shows your attitude towards the situation. It should be of 200 to 300 words.
  • Discuss your Career Goals: Discuss your career goal and how this scholarship will help you in achieving your higher education. Highlight how this scholarship will help you to participate in various career development opportunities that make you industry-ready.
  • Academic Accomplishments: Mention your academic accomplishments including high school achievements and recent achievements. Your achievements must include awards, scholarships, honors, research projects, publications, leadership roles, and other academic roles. Discuss how your academic journey helped you in learning a lot of things and shaped your goals and aspirations. It could be around 300 words.
  • Passion and Skills: Explain your passion and skills that help you in shaping your behavior and contribute to your personal growth. In this, you have to discuss your involvement in extracurricular activities, your interest areas in which you participated, volunteer work, community services, etc. All these works demonstrate your commitment to society, education, and the institution. It includes 200 to 300 words.
  • Hardships: Mention the challenges and hardships that you have faced in your life. Due to these challenges you have learned a lot and determined your goal. It includes financial issues, health issues, lack of opportunities, personal setbacks, etc. Discuss how these situations help you in developing your decision-making ability. It must wind up in 200 words.
  • Conclusion: At the end, summarise all the points and clearly state why you believe you are a deserving candidate. Show some gratitude to the scholarship providers and highlight how the scholarship will impact their education and future careers. Conclude with the statement of commitment to using the scholarship for the achievement of goals.
  • Editing: Without editing and proofreading, do not submit your biographical sketch for a scholarship. Conduct a proofreading of your biographical sketch with the help of experts, teachers, and professors. They will rectify your grammatical errors, spelling errors, and formatting errors, and make your application smooth and reliable.

Therefore, while writing your biographical sketch for a scholarship emphasize the requirements and eligibility criteria. Avoid using the same biographical sketch for every scholarship rather create it as per the needs and goals of the scholarship. Along with this, include all your qualities and experience that are relevant to achieving the scholarship.

While tailoring your biographical sketch, evaluate the goals and needs of the scholarship. Then, align them with your personal goals and aspirations. After setting your goals and objectives, start writing your biographical sketch. It must consist of the details that are important for the scholarship including your academic achievements, extracurricular involvement, awards, leadership roles, community commitment, hardships that help you in shaping your career, financial need statement, family background, etc. In the end, you have to show gratitude towards the institution that offers you the scholarship to fund your higher education. So, for an effective biographical sketch communicate your strengths and aspirations.

  • Applying For Scholarships

About Yourself Scholarship Essay Examples (2023)

Jennifer Finetti Sep 28, 2022

About Yourself Scholarship Essay Examples (2023)

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A popular scholarship essay prompt is “Tell us about yourself.” This question is relatively open-ended, which may make it difficult to answer at first glance. What should I tell them about myself? My struggles, my goals, my passions…? These may all be fitting topics, depending on the scholarship. We’ll show you some scholarship essay examples about yourself, along with writing tips to guide you along the way.

What they want to know about you

As you prepare to write, think of the topics the scholarship committee would be interested in. These may include:

  • Your current degree, as it applies to your overall career goals. You can explain why you chose your current educational path and what you want to do with that.
  • Your short-term and long-term professional goals . Frame your answer as if to say “Where will you be in 5 years? Where will you be in 10 years?” Scholarship committees like to reward people with defined aspirations.
  • Past experiences that sparked your passions. You could talk about an influential person in your life, but make sure most of the essay focuses on you. After all, you are talking about yourself.
  • Something about you that relates to their organization. With any scholarship essay, you should try to connect yourself with the organization providing the funding. Don’t force a connection. Find one that naturally fits. Mention hobbies, experiences and goals that match what the review committee is looking for.
  • Something unique that sets you apart from other applicants. This may be volunteer experience, career specialties, situational differences (growing up in an area that didn’t encourage education), etc.

Show off your skillset

Note that you do not have to throw all this information into one essay. Choose the elements that best fit the scholarship. If you were on the review board, what would you want to learn about each applicant? What would make you choose one applicant over another? Keep this in mind as you develop your thoughts.

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What they don’t want to know about you

There is plenty of information you could include in an about yourself scholarship essay. There is just as much information to avoid though. Some topics to keep out of your essay include:

  • False information. Do not make up stories or fabricate goals to fit the prompt. The scholarship committee can instantly tell when someone is lying, and they will disqualify you immediately.
  • Past struggles that do not pertain to the essay topic. You can briefly mention struggles from your past, as long as you mention how you’ve learned from them. Do not make your essay a long story about the hard life you’ve led. Focus on your triumphs, not your obstacles.
  • Vague goals and aspirations. Scholarships are usually given to students who have a plan. If you say, “I’m not sure what I’m doing yet,” the committee will select a more motivated candidate. If you have a plan and a backup plan, that’s fine. Just make sure you mention both options and show which one you favor.
  • Cliché stories that most people tell. There is something that makes you stand out as a person. Use that to your advantage. Don’t rely on generic information they’ll find with other applicants.
  • Unrelated elements of your personal life. In most cases, you should not mention your significant other in the essay. You might mention a spouse if you need to reference your children or a turning point in your life, but these personal details do not fit most essays. Any information that seems frivolous or ill-placed should be removed from the essay.

Read through your essay carefully. If you stop at one point to say, “Why did I mention that?” get rid of the corresponding information. Showcase the best elements about yourself in a fluid and cohesive manner.

Short scholarship essay example: Tell us about yourself (100 Words)

With 100 words, you can only focus on one or two elements of your life. Think about your biggest selling points – the things that show you are the ideal candidate. Start by introducing yourself and your educational status. Then jump into the main topic of the essay. You may not have room to mention how the scholarship will help your education. Instead, mention how your education can help your career. The other information will be implied.

My name is Christian Wood. I am a high school senior who will be attending the University of Nevada, Reno in the fall. I want to become an online journalist. My goal is to work for the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Huffington Post, or another news outlet that has a strong online presence. Most people already get their news on the internet, and the industry will be even bigger by the time I graduate. Getting a degree in journalism with a focus on digital media will set me up for a fulfilling, fast-paced career fit for the future.

Word Count: 96

Medium scholarship essay example: Tell us about yourself (250 Words)

With a mid-length scholarship essay, you have more space to explain how your past has influenced your present and future goals. You should have rom for an intro paragraph, a few body paragraphs, and a conclusion (maybe incorporated into the last body paragraph). Think of a few main points you want to touch on, and write those down first. If you still have room, you can add more details about yourself.

My name is Sarah, and I spent most of my childhood on the wrong medication. I experienced a problem common in clinical psychology – misdiagnosis. Professionals provide inaccurate diagnoses for many reasons – f rom antiquated testing methods to limited education. I want to open my own psychological testing facility and help change that. Therefore, I am pursuing a Ph.D. in Clinical Neuropsychology.  I was diagnosed with ADHD as a child because I had trouble focusing in school. The medication m y doctor prescribed to me only made me numb to the world around me. I couldn’t think or process emotions, or had no emotions at all. After several years my parents finally decided to get a second opinion. I saw a specialist and she concluded that I didn’t have ADHD , but a combination of dyslexia and dysgraphia (difficulties with reading and writing). She sent us to a therapist who helped me learn how to work around my conditions, and my life improved tremendously. I went from being a lifeless student with barely passing grades to an honor roll student full of joy and excitement. Unfortunately, my story is not one of a kind. There are countless children in America who are put on mind-altering medications that do not adequately address their needs. I cannot help all of those children, but I can provide a better alternative for the ones in my area. Through proper education, funded by financial aid, I can learn about psychological evaluations and provide the most accurate diagnoses possible.

Word Count: 249

Long scholarship essay example: Tell us about yourself (500 Words)

Scholarship essays that are 500 words or longer let you tell the whole story. You can discuss your past, present and future in a comprehensive manner. Avoid rambling and make sure each topic contributes to the overall essay. If one piece feels out of place, remove it and elaborate more on the existing elements. By the end of the essay, the reader should have a full understanding of who you are and what you want to accomplish.

My name is Sierra Breault, and I am a junior at Murray State University. I am double-majoring in Criminal Justice and Forensics Science, and I will graduate in 2024 with two bachelor degrees. My career goal is in social justice, so I can contribute to criminal justice reform. I want to ensure that those who commit crimes are treated fairly.  I come from a small town where excessive force and even death by cop incidents are often committed, especially against minorities. A few years ago, one of my relatives was charged for a crime although the crime scene evidence wasn’t properly obtained, catalogued and analyzed.  This experience played a big part in my wish to study criminal justice. I started exploring the career more when I decided that a desk job just wasn’t for me. Throughout high school I struggled because of the routine nature of it all. I saw the same people and attended the same classes every single day. I knew I didn’t want a job that would be that stagnant. That’s when I got the idea to work in law enforcement, because there would always be a new challenge for me to tackle. After researching the field even more, I set my sights on crime scene investigation. I have performed much better academically in college than I ever did in high school. That’s because there is no routine to the experience. Every week, I have new projects to complete, tests to study for, and activities to try. I have been involved with the campus Crime Stoppers organization all three years of college, and I was elected president for the upcoming term. This lets me work closely with law enforcement to supplement my college education and further my career.   After graduating, I will apply for work as a dispatcher in a state organization, such as the Department of Criminal Investigation. While my ultimate goal is to work as a forensic analyst or crime scene investigator, those positions usually only go to people within the organization. Dispatch is the most direct option for career entry, giving me the best chance to pursue my dream career. I am applying for this scholarship to help me finish the last two years of my degrees. As a college junior and soon-to-be senior, my scholarship opportunities are limited. Most awards are reserved for freshmen. I took advantage of those early on, and I have one recurring scholarship that covers half of my tuition. However, I need additional financial aid to cover the remainder of my academic costs. I appreciate your consideration, and I hope that you can help me pursue a profession in criminal justice. This is my passion, and I have a clear plan to turn that passion into a lifelong career.

Word Count: 463

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  • Scholarship Essay

Jennifer Finetti

Jennifer Finetti

As a parent who recently helped her own kids embark on their college journeys, Jennifer approaches the transition from high school to college from a unique perspective. She truly enjoys engaging with students – helping them to build the confidence, knowledge, and insight needed to pursue their educational and career goals, while also empowering them with the strategies and skills needed to access scholarships and financial aid that can help limit college costs. She understands the importance of ensuring access to the edtech tools and resources that can make this process easier and more equitable - this drive to support underserved populations is what drew her to ScholarshipOwl. Jennifer has coached students from around the world, as well as in-person with local students in her own community. Her areas of focus include career exploration, major selection, college search and selection, college application assistance, financial aid and scholarship consultation, essay review and feedback, and more. She works with students who are at the top of their class, as well as those who are struggling. She firmly believes that all students, regardless of their circumstances, can succeed if they stay focused and work hard in school. Jennifer earned her MA in Counseling Psychology from National University, and her BA in Psychology from University of California, Santa Cruz.

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how to write biography for scholarship

How to write a biography

how to write biography for scholarship

Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology

  • By Edwin L. Battistella
  • July 1 st 2018

This year I’ve been reading a lot of biographies and writing some short profile pieces. Both experiences have caused me to reflect back on a book-length biography I wrote a few years ago on the little-known educator Sherwin Cody .

I first learned about Sherwin Cody as an adolescent, when I spotted his “remarkable invention [that] has improved the speech and writing of thousands of people” in the back of a comic book. (It turned out to be a patented workbook of grammar exercises.) Many years later, reading about the history of writing instruction, I became fascinated by Cody’s life and career, so much so that I decided to tell his story. The rest is history, or more accurately, biography.

Writing a book-length biography was a new experience for me at the time. I learned a lot along the way. Here are a few tips based on my experience.

Start small —A good way to begin is by writing a short profile of your subject in no more than 1,000 words. Imagine it as a short encyclopedia piece or obituary of the person that encapsulates the basic story (the who, what, where, when and how ) along with discussion of significant accomplishments and challenges. The profile will tell you if you know enough to write more and also help you to clarify your stance toward the subject. If you feel too strongly about your subject you may not be the ideal person to write a biography. There may be a temptation to adulate or unmask.

Figure out the contexts— Spend some time studying the individual’s era. What was the state of the world during the person’s lifetime, and how did major events intersect with your subject’s life. The context can be large-scale, taking in the sweep of history over several generations, or finely grained, covering one life span. But understanding the world as it was will give you a sense of how your subject may have seen it.

If you are writing about someone who has already been the subject of biographical work, you also need to consider the context of what other writers have said. How does your effort add to the story? Do you have new material? Has there been a re-evaluation of the individual? Has society changed in such a way that the person has new relevance? Is there an anniversary on the horizon? (You’ll want to plan way ahead for that last one!)

Develop a research network— As you dig into your work, be on the lookout for new material. Is archival material coming available? Are there family members who have recollections or bits of ephemera? Can you find some librarians or archivists or historical society staffers who share your interest? Some of this research may involve travel and/or copying fees, so keep that cost in mind.

Engage the backstory— Part of the enjoyment of writing a biography is that it allows you to put together a mystery not just out of large events, but out of small puzzle pieces as well. A description of some event during a person’s college years or on a vacation, for example, can illustrate their personality just as well as a large life event does, and it can make the subject relatable to readers who may have had a similar experience. Finding the sweet spot between too much digression and just enough backstory will not come immediately but it is worth the effort.

Be open to refocusing your idea— As you write and learn more about your subject, it may turn out that the story you are writing is not really about just one person. Perhaps it is a story about an ensemble of like-minded people, or a movement, and perhaps the stories of others are just as fascinating and important. Your work could turn out to be about a group working together or in opposition, or about people set in different times or places brought together by common thread. It may not be a biography in the strict sense and that’s fine. You can adjust.

Writing a biography can take an author anywhere. If there is someone whose life fascinates you and that you are in a position to illuminate as a researcher and writer, jump in.

Featured image credit:  Epicantus by Daria. CC-BY-2.0 via Flickr .

Edwin L. Battistella teaches linguistics and writing at Southern Oregon University in Ashland, where he has served as a dean and as interim provost. He is the author of Do You Make These Mistakes in English? (OUP, 2009), Bad Language (OUP, 2005), and The Logic of Markedness (OUP, 1996). He is also the author of  Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology .

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Biography Samples For Students: How To Write A Perfect One?

July 23, 2023

Navigating through the academic world, students often find themselves in situations where they need to present a concise yet impactful biography. Whether it’s for a scholarship application, a college admission essay, or a professional networking platform, a well-crafted student biography can open doors to opportunities. In this guide, we’ll explore some biography samples for students and provide you with tips to write one for yourself.

What Is A Student Biography?

A student biography is a concise written account that provides an overview of a student’s academic background, achievements, extracurricular activities, and career aspirations.

It serves as a tool for introducing oneself to teachers, peers, scholarship committees, college admissions officers, or potential employers.

Student biographies are often required for various purposes, such as college applications, scholarship applications, internship opportunities, and networking profiles.

Why Student Biographies Matter

A student biography serves as a snapshot of your academic journey, achievements, and aspirations. It allows you to introduce yourself to others in a way that goes beyond grades and test scores, providing a personal touch that can make a lasting impression on educators, peers, and potential mentors.

biography samples for students

Elements of a Standout Student Biography

1. Academic Background: Share information about your current academic pursuits, including your major, classes, and any notable achievements or projects.

2. Extracurricular Activities: Highlight your involvement in clubs, sports, volunteer work, or any other activities outside of the classroom. This demonstrates a well-rounded personality and showcases your interests.

3. Achievements and Awards: Mention any academic awards, scholarships, or honors you’ve received. This helps validate your dedication and excellence in your studies.

4. Career Aspirations: Discuss your future goals and career aspirations. This could include the field you want to enter, specific job roles, or how you envision making a positive impact.

5. Personal Touch (Optional):  If appropriate for the context, consider adding a personal touch by mentioning hobbies, interests, or aspects of your life outside of academics. This can humanize your biography and make it more memorable.

Sample Student Biographies

Example 1: science enthusiast.

Hello, I’m [Your Name], a sophomore majoring in Physics at [Your University]. My passion for unraveling the mysteries of the universe extends beyond the classroom. As an active member of the Science Club, I’ve had the opportunity to collaborate on research projects, including [Brief Project Description].

My goal is to pursue a Ph.D. in Astrophysics, combining my love for research with a commitment to advancing our understanding of the cosmos.

Example 2: Social Justice Advocate

Greetings! I’m [Your Name], a dedicated student pursuing a degree in Sociology at [Your College]. Beyond academics, I am deeply involved in community service initiatives, such as [Volunteer Work]. My aim is to leverage my education to promote social justice and equality.

Inspired by [Influential Figure], I aspire to contribute to building a more inclusive and equitable society.

Example 3: Future Business Leader

Hi there! I’m [Your Name], a junior majoring in Business Administration at [Your School]. My academic journey has been complemented by my role as the president of the Business Club, where I’ve organized successful networking events like [Event Name].

My ambition is to leverage my entrepreneurial skills to innovate within the business world and make a positive impact on local communities.

Need More Examples?

biography samples for students

Here are two more examples of student biographies tailored for different purposes:

Example A: College Application

Hello! I’m [Your Name], a high school senior eagerly anticipating the next chapter of my academic journey. Currently pursuing a rigorous course load with a focus on STEM subjects, I have developed a passion for physics and mathematics. As an active member of the Science Club, I’ve had the privilege of leading a team in the regional science fair, where our project on renewable energy solutions earned first place.

Beyond academics, I am deeply involved in community service through my role as a volunteer at [Local Organization]. This experience has not only broadened my perspective but also reinforced my commitment to making a positive impact. My academic achievements, including being named a National Merit Scholar, reflect my dedication to excellence.

Looking ahead, I aspire to major in Physics and continue exploring sustainable solutions to global challenges. My goal is to contribute to scientific advancements that address environmental issues. I am excited about the prospect of joining [University Name] and engaging with a community that shares my passion for knowledge and innovation.

Example B: Scholarship Application

Greetings! I am [Your Name], a junior majoring in Business Administration at [Your University]. My academic journey has been complemented by my active involvement in the Business Club, where I currently serve as the vice president. Through organizing networking events and workshops, I’ve developed leadership and organizational skills that I believe are essential for success in the business world.

My dedication to academic excellence has been recognized with the Dean’s List distinction for three consecutive semesters. Additionally, I am the recipient of the [Scholarship Name], an honor that has significantly eased the financial burden of pursuing higher education.

Looking forward, I am determined to leverage my education and experiences to contribute to the business field. My long-term goal is to establish a socially responsible business that fosters innovation and positively impacts local communities. Receiving the [Scholarship Name] would not only support my academic journey but also empower me to pursue these aspirations with greater focus and determination.

These examples demonstrate how a student biography can be tailored for different purposes, such as a college application or a scholarship application. They include information about academic pursuits, extracurricular involvement, achievements, and future aspirations, providing a comprehensive overview of the student’s profile.

Conclusion on biography samples for students

Crafting a compelling student biography is an invaluable skill that goes beyond academic settings. Whether you’re applying for scholarships, internships, or simply introducing yourself to your peers, a well-crafted biography can open doors and create connections.

Use these samples as inspiration, and remember to infuse your unique personality and aspirations into your own narrative. Your student biography is your story—make it memorable!

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How to Write a Good Academic Biography (Part 2)

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Writing an academic biography is part of many academic activities. Whether your paper is accepted in a journal or you’re asked to present your findings at a conference, you will be required to submit a biography. How would you begin writing? How long should it be? What should you include? The following article is in continuation of the article ‘ How to Write a Good Academic Biography–Part 1’ .

In a short biography, you will be limited to just a few sentences or a short paragraph. It is important that you include just the basic information about yourself. One of the main objectives of a biography is to emphasize your accomplishments. This will provide the reader with an overall idea of your background. This information need not be too detailed. Additionally, a biography is written in the “third person.” This means that you should avoid using “I” and present yourself as though you are reading someone else’s biography. The sentences below provide examples of the appropriate format.

Starting with the basic information about yourself and include the following:

  • Full name: How often do you write your full name? There could be others with the same name and you want to distinguish yourself from them.
  • Position: Your position at your academic institute lets the audience know more about your background and interests. If you are a graduate student, it will be impressive that you have been asked to present your research or that you have been published.
  • Institution: It is important that you acknowledge your organization or institution.

This information should be presented in a prose format in the actual academic biography, not bulleted as here. For example, the piece might begin with the following sentence:

“Joseph Tiberius Schmoe is a doctoral candidate at the University of Minnesota.”

You can follow this introductory sentence with information about the main areas of your research. For example:

“Mr. Schmoe conducted research on the social structure of the Bonobo monkeys ( Pan paniscus ) in the Congo Basin of Central Africa.”

After these introductory sentences, you can add other details, such as how long you’ve been studying the species. You can add a hypothesis and how your research differs from that of others. You might also include some research milestones.

Short academic biographies are usually about 35–50 words. However, long biographies can range from 100 to 400 words. These would include more detail and the context would be different. For example, in a longer biography, you might include the following:

  • Academic degrees
  • Specific academic projects
  • Awards and/or honors
  • Published pieces
  • Personal interests

Longer academic biographies can be used on a personal website or be a part of the job application. This is usually not the format for conferences and seminars.

Know Your Audience

Although you must limit your biographical information, you can still gear it towards the audience or reader. Keep in mind the following three specifications:

  • Your audience: Who is going to read your biography? Are they conference attendees or funding sources?
  • The context: Will the biography be printed in a journal or in a conference proceeding? Will it be posted on a university or corporate website? Wil it be shared in events such as disciplinary conventions. Read biographies of your peers for reference.
  • The purpose: Why are you being asked for a biography? Are you meeting with other researchers in the same field? Are you meeting with clients or funders?

These three main points will help you choose the information that would be most relevant to those reviewing it. It will also help you create a specific writing tone or style for that audience.

What Not to Do

You don’t have much space to write about yourself so make it count. Be sure that you are succinct and relevant. The following should be heeded:

  • Avoid using humor. In short biographies, there is no space for it but be careful with it even in long biographies. You can include some humorous stories aside from your biographical information on your webpage.
  • Avoid very personal information. This is especially important at a conference. Your first impression is important and you want people to remember you for your accomplishments. Be professional.
  • Avoid providing too much information. Present the information concerning your current position, research, or employment. Information about your past, such as high school, is not necessary.

Remember to keep your writing somewhat formal.

A colleague of yours is asked for a biography for a conference in her field of study. She has attended several prestigious universities and has conducted many research studies. She was also a Peace Corps volunteer and a medic for Doctors without Borders. She would like to list all of these details because she believes that they are important. How would you advise her?

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How to Write a College Autobiography

1. focus on a goal.

When you’re writing a regular essay, you know that you have to have a thesis to focus your paper. In the same way, a college autobiography also needs a thesis. In this case, your thesis will be your goals in life and how getting into this college program will help you achieve your goals.

An example would be if you want to become a green energy architect. Your thesis would be that you need a masters degree in architecture to achieve your goal, that this particular college has the perfect masters degree program for you, and that you are a perfect candidate for the college.

2. Give specific examples of experiences

Affirm your goal in the opening of your statement. In follow up paragraphs, document experiences in the field or during school that correlate to your goal, including the value you learned from each example. In your conclusion, summarize your experiences, what led you to the specific graduate school and why the school is the next step toward your goal.

3. Ditch the boring stuff

In a college autobiography, you should show what you believe you are capable of. Unless relevant, don’t mention where you grew up, which school you went to, or how your friends changed your life. Only mention experiences relevant to your cause that directly improve your chances of getting the scholarship or the place in the college of your choice.

4. Develop clear themes

Identify and develop the themes that run through the information you present to the admissions committee. A theme is a general category or “big idea” that applies to the most important memories of your past, such as identity (how you fit into the world around you), passion (as in lifelong interests), challenges, curiosity, learning, failure, personality, or career.

5. Avoid over-used phrases

Avoid over-used phrases such as: “meant a lot to me,” “I can contribute” and “appealing to me.” You also want to avoid statements that are broad and awkward such as: “I like helping people” and passive voice, such as “I will be” or “I am excited by.”

6. Use specific examples

Use specific examples to illustrate your personal attributes and achievements. For example, instead of saying “this was a valuable learning experience,” tell what you learned. Instead of calling yourself “a responsible individual” or a “born leader,” relate life experiences that demonstrate this.

7. Give a sense of you as a person

Along with your life experiences, include your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps the college admissions committee understand what makes you who you are.

8. Show you have outside interests

Be sure to include something that you recently became aware of and how you’ve involved yourself with that topic. Admissions boards want to see that you have interests outside of the classroom and will take initiative in discovering new and exciting fields of research while in school.

9. Include research credits

If you’ve already done research and published it, this is of course important information for the admissions committee. If you have unpublished work, submit it with your application, and someone from the field will judge the quality of the work. If you don’t have any prior research, you can still get in because schools are trying to judge potential to do research.

10. Look into your magic ball

Even if you haven’t decided what kind of work you want to do when you graduate, take a guess based on your current interests. Look into the future and imagine what you see yourself doing in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them. If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too.

It’s not written in stone: you can change your mind later. But you need to give the admissions committee an idea of your goals in life.

11. Identify both short-term and long-term goals

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier and both in terms of direction and timing, but you should have them.

12. Have a  Plan B

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading public relations firm, what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B? Addressing these questions will show the admissions committee that you are flexible and realistic.

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  3. Autobiography For Scholarship Examples

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  5. Autobiography For Scholarship Examples

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  6. Need to write a student bio? Checkthis student biography example and

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  4. how to write a biography of Albert Einstein

  5. Sources of Scholarships

  6. How to Write a Scholarship Essay ||Study For Abroad ||Info about Scholarships with 3005

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Biography to Win a Scholarship

    Begin with a sentence that describes who you are and why you're an ideal choice for the scholarship. For example, if you're applying for a flute scholarship, explain when you began playing and why it's so important to you. Use the rest of the introduction to show off your special attributes.

  2. FWSF Scholarship Biography examples

    First paragraph: (Name of Scholarship Recipient) is a/an (undergraduate/graduate at school name). If a graduate student, please add your undergraduate degree and institution. Describe briefly what your major is - field of study, specific certificates and/or credentials being awarded, and any additional minors to be achieved.

  3. How to Start a Scholarship Essay (With Examples)

    The first sentence of the essay is what makes the reader want to continue reading. Engage the reader by appealing to the senses. Create a sense of wonder in your essay, making the reader want to learn more about you. Keep the ending of the essay in mind as you craft the beginning.

  4. Creating a professional bio for a scholarship?

    Here are some tips and a brief outline to help you create a compelling professional bio: 1. Start with an attention-grabbing opening sentence: Begin by introducing yourself with a strong statement that encapsulates your background, current situation, or a key achievement that relates to the scholarship.

  5. How to Write a Personal Statement for a Scholarship + Examples

    When you are not provided a prompt, you want to write a personal statement that is essentially a small-scale autobiography where you position yourself as a good investment. In either case, you should identify a focus or theme for what you are trying to say about yourself so that your application does not get lost in the shuffle.

  6. How To Write A Bio For Scholarship

    Keep It Succinct When writing your bio, make sure to keep it concise and to the point. Scholarship bios should not exceed 500 words, so it is important to stick to the key points while still providing enough information.

  7. How to Write a Biosketch

    Write in the third person. This means that instead of using "I" statements, use "he/she/they" statements. The information you include in your BioSketch is unique to you and your circumstances. While your BioSketch may look different from the examples below, be sure to include the important general information outlined in the paragraph ...

  8. How To Write A Good Academic Biography

    Don't divulge details beyond your current position. In a longer bio of multiple paragraphs, you may add more awards and information about your master's and bachelor's degrees, but not in a short bio. Moreover, don't add anything that happened before grad school—including your place of birth. For example: Hi!

  9. Professional Bio-Writing 101

    Your bio should be brief, concise, and clear. Establish a Background Story Highlighting your background will give the reader an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of your personal narrative, which may not be evident on your resume. Also, consider including recent events, such as studying abroad or volunteering.

  10. How to Write a Biography: 6 Tips for Writing Biographical Texts

    Whether you want to start writing a biography about a famous person, historical figure, or an influential family member, it's important to know all the elements that make a biography worth both writing and reading. Biographies are how we learn information about another human being's life. Whether you want to start writing a biography about ...

  11. How to Write a Scholarship Essay

    How to Write a Scholarship Essay | Template & Example Published on October 11, 2021 by Kirsten Courault . Revised on May 31, 2023. A good scholarship essay demonstrates the scholarship organization's values while directly addressing the prompt. If you plan ahead, you can save time by writing one essay for multiple prompts with similar questions.

  12. How to Write a Biography in 8 Steps (The Non-Boring Way!)

    a) Examination of the subject's lasting influence, contributions, or impact on society. b) Discuss how their work or actions continue to resonate or shape the world today. c) Reflection on their legacy and the lessons we can learn from their life story.

  13. An Example on How to Write an Autobiography for a Scholarship

    When writing your autobiography, focus on what your grade sheets, letters of recommendation, and other additional documents you have given for your admission do not focus on. This is your chance to prove your suitability for a scholarship. Your transcripts already reflect your GPA, and your letters of recommendation already show what others ...

  14. 50 Attractive Bio Examples for Students

    How to Write a Great Bio for Students? Here are some tips on how to write a great bio example for students: Related Bio Examples for Students Do you feel intimidated when it comes to writing a bio as a student? It's understandable - after all, you're still growing your skills and may not have much professional experience yet.

  15. How to Write a Biographical Sketch for a Scholarship?

    Introduction: You should start a biography and sketch with your introduction. You can use any phrase and a compelling statement that describes you and grabs the attention of the reader. Your introduction makes you an ideal candidate for the scholarship. So, try to write it effectively.

  16. Write A "Tell Us About Yourself" Scholarship Essay (3 Examples)

    9 min read About Yourself Scholarship Essay Examples (2023) Jennifer Finetti Sep 28, 2022 Get our best scholarship practices, insights & tips delivered to your inbox A popular scholarship essay prompt is "Tell us about yourself." This question is relatively open-ended, which may make it difficult to answer at first glance.

  17. How to write a biography

    Here are a few tips based on my experience. Start small —A good way to begin is by writing a short profile of your subject in no more than 1,000 words. Imagine it as a short encyclopedia piece or obituary of the person that encapsulates the basic story (the who, what, where, when and how) along with discussion of significant accomplishments ...

  18. Writing a Scholarship Biography?

    When writing a short biography for a scholarship application, it's essential to focus on the most relevant and impressive aspects of your personal, academic, and extracurricular life. Here's a breakdown of the key components you should consider including in your biography: 1.

  19. DOCX Long Beach City College

    Writing an Autobiographyfor a Scholarship Application. The Writing Process. Visualize your audience. Think about who will read your autobiography. Put yourself in the reader's place. Think about the purpose of the autobiography. Why do members of the scholarship committee want to know something about you? How would an autobiography help them ...

  20. Biography Samples For Students: How To Write A Perfect One?

    1. Academic Background: Share information about your current academic pursuits, including your major, classes, and any notable achievements or projects. 2. Extracurricular Activities: Highlight your involvement in clubs, sports, volunteer work, or any other activities outside of the classroom.

  21. How to Write a Good Academic Biography (Part 2)

    It is important that you include just the basic information about yourself. One of the main objectives of a biography is to emphasize your accomplishments. This will provide the reader with an overall idea of your background. This information need not be too detailed. Additionally, a biography is written in the "third person.".

  22. How to Write a College Autobiography

    5. Avoid over-used phrases. Avoid over-used phrases such as: "meant a lot to me," "I can contribute" and "appealing to me.". You also want to avoid statements that are broad and awkward such as: "I like helping people" and passive voice, such as "I will be" or "I am excited by.". 6. Use specific examples.

  23. AlphaGamma on Instagram: "Are you passionate about solving the climate

    0 likes, 0 comments - alphagammaofficial on February 21, 2024: "Are you passionate about solving the climate crisis and creating a sustainable future? If y..."