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How Do I Change My Corporate Articles of Incorporation?

Changing Your Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws

  • What are Articles of Incorporation?
  • Why Corporate Articles are Amended
  • State Laws and Corp. Amendments
  • Change Articles of Incorporation

Changing Your Corporate Bylaws

Consult your attorney first.

It's a never-ending process keeping up with changes in your corporation. Sometimes you may need to make big changes and to reflect those changes in major corporate documents, like your corporate by-laws and even the Articles of Incorporation. 

What Are the Articles of Incorporation? 

The articles of incorporation for your corporation are the documents you filed with your state's secretary of state registering the corporation within the state. Depending on the requirements of the state in which the corporation is registered, these articles include: 

  • The name of the corporation, the start date  and the duration (usually perpetual)
  • The type of corporation (a  stock  corporation or non-stock ) and information about initial shares of stock
  • The name and address of the corporation's registered agent  (the person or company authorized to receive business correspondence about legal matters)
  • Names and addresses of the initial directors and of the incorporator (the person in charge of setting up the corporation).     

Why Are Corporate Articles Amended?

Since much of the information in the articles of incorporation relates to its initial founding, there are only a few reasons to change these articles. Primarily, articles of incorporation are amended to make major changes that the state needs to know about

These changes you must inform your state about include:

  • a change of address,
  • a change in purpose,
  • a change in your official company name,
  • a change in your egistered agent (you must include acceptance by the new registered agent)
  • a change in type of corporation (from a general corporation to a professional corporation, for example,
  • or to change stock information.    

State Laws and Corporate Amendments

Corporations operate under the laws of a specific state and the laws of each state has different requirements for amending articles of incorporation. Each state also charges a fee for filing corporate amendments. Florida, for example, changes a filing fee of $35.00.  

For example, California law requires that your company prepare and file a Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State. The Certificate of Amendment must include:

  • The parties certifying the certificate (usually the president and secretary of the corporation)
  • The article being amended
  • A statement that the amendment has been approved by the board, and
  • By the required number of shareholders (if there are shareholders).  

For details on the requirements for amending your corporation's articles of incorporation, check with your state's secretary of state.

How Do I Change the Articles of Incorporation?

This change process applies only to corporations that are required to have Articles of Incorporation (and similar documents. In most states, you would file articles of amendment with the state to make changes to your articles of incorporation. 

In general, the process to change the Articles of Incorporation includes these steps:

  • First, a proposal must be prepared and presented to the company board of directors.
  • The board adopts a corporate resolution approving the proposal.
  • If there are shareholders or members, they must vote on the change. The vote usually takes place at a formal meeting of the corporation (annual meeting or other) and shareholders must be advised of the proposed change before the meeting.
  • If the shareholders approve the change to the articles of incorporation, the amended document must be attested to by the corporate secretary.
  • Then send the document, along with the filing fee, to your state's secretary of state for paying the fee and filing.

An amendment is not necessary for most states for the following (but check with your state before making any changes to articles of incorporation):

  • To change the names and address of directors, incorporators, etc. But an amendment or other change notice must be filed with your state if the registered agent changes or the resident agent's address changes.
  • To reduce the number of authorized shares of stock. But an increase in the number of shares of stock requires an amendment.
  • To change the corporation's name.

LLCs are also regulated by state law, so if you need to amend your LLC's articles of organization, you can use a similar process to that of amending corporate articles. Check with your state's secretary of state/business division for the regulations and process.

The bylaws of your corporation are the rules by which your corporate board of directors operates. After you have set up your corporation by files your articles of incorporation and you have created your board of directors, the board sets out the bylaws.  

Your board can change its bylaws by resolution. you don't need to file corporate bylaw changes with your state.  

Before making changes to articles of incorporation, and before amending such articles, consult your attorney. He or she will know the laws in your state and can help you draft amendment language and walk you through the process of amending your articles of incorporation.

Digital Media Law Project. " Articles of Incorporation ." Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

Legal Information Institute. " Articles of Incorporation ." Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

Florida Department of State. Division of Corporations. " Filing Articles of Amendment ." Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

California Secretary of State. Business Programs Division. "A mendment of California Stock Corporations ." Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

Legal Information Institute. " Bylaws ." Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

Digital Media Law Project. " Corporate Bylaws. " Accessed Dec. 16, 2019.

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Amendment to Articles of Incorporation

Use our Amendment to Articles of Incorporation to easily record corporate changes.

amendment to articles of incorporation form

Updated September 29, 2023 Reviewed by Brooke Davis

An Amendment to Articles of Incorporation is formally filed when updates, additions, or other modifications are needed to alter the original content of the articles. Such changes may include, but are not limited to, alterations to stock information.

The primary purpose of this amendment is to ensure that your Articles of Incorporation accurately represent your company’s current structure and operations. You can align your legal documents with the reality of your business, maintaining compliance with state regulations.

Common Reasons for Amendments

  • Changes to the name and address of the corporation
  • Alterations to capital structure
  • Changes to purpose or business activities
  • Modifications to registered agent information
  • Adding or removing owners, managers, and officers

What is an Amendment to Articles of Incorporation?

How to amend articles of incorporation, key considerations when making amendments, what should amendments to articles of incorporation contain, amendment to articles of incorporation sample.

An amendment to the Articles of Incorporation refers to a formal change or modification to a corporation’s original articles.

The Articles of Incorporation, also known as a corporate charter or certificate of incorporation, is a document that establishes a corporation’s existence and outlines its basic governing rules and structure. When a corporation needs to change this foundational document, it does so through an amendment.

Navigating the proper steps will help ensure your amendments are appropriately documented and comply with state regulations.

Step 1—Research State Requirements

Each state may have its regulations and guidelines for amending, including specific forms, fees, and deadlines.

In some states, like Arizona, alterations in the names of directors, members, or managers within an entity may necessitate the filing of amendments. However, several other states do not mandate such documents to the formation documents for such changes but will require including this information in the annual report.

By consulting the appropriate state resources or seeking legal advice, you can ensure you meet all the requirements and avoid potential delays or complications in filing.

Step 2—Prepare the Amendment

At this stage, you should draft the necessary language and provide accurate information to reflect the changes you wish to make.

Sift through the company’s bylaws, as they will outline the requirements and procedures. Thoroughly reviewing every need and step listed is crucial to ensure that any amendments are legally compliant.

Step 3—File the Amendment

After preparing the document, you must file it with the appropriate state agency responsible for overseeing corporations. This typically involves sending it to the Secretary of State by mail or in person. You have to pay a fee via check, and you can find out the amount on the Secretary of State’s website.

It’s crucial to follow the filing instructions your state agency provides carefully. Failure to comply with the proper filing procedures can result in delays or rejection.

Before proceeding with amending your corporation’s Articles of Incorporation, here are two key considerations to keep in mind:

Notifying Shareholders, Directors, Members, or Managers

Depending on your state’s regulations and the specific provisions in your Articles of Incorporation, you may be required to notify interested parties about proposed amendments. This may involve providing copies or informing them of a meeting to discuss the proposed changes.

Ensuring compliance with notification requirements is essential for maintaining transparency and receiving approvals for your amendments.

Assessing the Impact on Bylaws and Other Corporate Documents

Amendments to your Articles of Incorporation can affect other corporate documents, such as corporate bylaws, operating agreements, or shareholders agreements . Before proceeding, assessing how these changes may impact other aspects of your company’s governance is crucial.

Reviewing your bylaws and other corporate documents will help ensure consistency and alignment with the changes proposed in your amendments.

Maintaining Compliance

Once you have successfully filed your amendment, taking additional steps to maintain compliance and ensure that your records accurately reflect the changes made is essential.

After filing, update your corporate records, including your bylaws and other relevant corporate documents, to reflect the changes made. This will help ensure consistency and alignment throughout your company’s governance structure.

Notify relevant parties about the amendments made to your Articles of Incorporation. This can be done through official communication channels, such as corporate meetings or written notices.

Amending your corporation’s Articles of Incorporation does not have to be a complex process. Here are the top things to have in mind:

  • Name and State: Identify the entity making the amendment.
  • Date of Amendment: Specifies the effective date of the proposed changes.
  • Article Number Being Amended: Pinpoints precisely which article is undergoing modification.
  • Amendment Declaration: A formal statement indicating that the specified article is subject to amendment.
  • Content of the Amendment: Detailed articulation of the modifications made.
  • Continuation Statement: A proclamation asserting that all other sections of the articles persist in being fully operative and effective.
  • Names and Signatures of Directors: Authentication and endorsement of the document through directorial acknowledgments.

Download our amendment form in PDF and Word formats. Start making corporate updates with ease today.

amendment to articles of incorporation form

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How to file articles of amendment for your LLC or Corporation

January 18, 2024

Carl Breedlove

Whether you have a limited liability company (LLC) or a corporation, there may come a time when you need to update your business’s details with your Secretary of State. Thankfully, you don’t need to send formation documents for an entirely new business entity to make a business amendment. Instead, most states allow you to file Articles of Amendment to make changes to your company.

Below, you’ll discover how these forms work and the general filing requirements for LLCs and corporations .

Key takeaways

  • Articles of Amendment allow you to change your business’s name, address, or registered agent without submitting brand-new formation documents.
  • You may need to update your BOI report if your amendment involves certain information, such as the company’s name or address.
  • Submission details and requirements vary by state, so consult your Secretary of State’s or equivalent entity’s website for specific guidelines.

What is an article of amendment?

An LLC owner filing articles of amendment

Articles of Amendment is a common form used in many states to inform the Secretary of State (or similar office) about changes in your business.

The exact name of this form may differ depending on your state. For example, in New York, it’s known as the “Certificate of Amendment” but serves the same purpose as Articles of Amendment found in other states.

Typically, you’ll use this form when you want to:

  • Conduct a business name change.
  • Change your registered agent.
  • Change your principal office, street, or mailing address.

You don’t always have to submit Articles of Amendment for these changes. Some states have separate forms covering changes that others include in broader amendment forms. New York, for example, has a specific form for a registered agent change of address. You also don’t typically need to file an Articles of Amendment to apply for a trade name, which has different filing requirements.

Because each state has different requirements and nomenclature, you should start by determining what type of form is required when you want to make an amendment. In most cases, it will be your state’s equivalent of the Articles of Amendment. But there are also times when you can submit a simpler, cheaper filing or restate your initial formation documents.

Amendments for LLCs

Though the exact process for making a business amendment, such as altering your LLC name, differs from state to state, the following are the three key steps to take generally for making an amendment to an LLC .

Step 1 — File your articles of amendment

The first step is finding the correct form for LLC amendments. Usually, you can find this on your Secretary of State’s website. In many cases, this will be a single form that covers everything from name changes to electing a new registered agent. However, some states use multiple, separate forms focused on specific changes.

You’ll be asked to describe the change you wish to make. You will also need to denote the effective date for the change, which is when it will take effect. These forms typically come with a filing fee. The amount will depend on the state. You can usually pay via check or with a credit card. Most states allow you to submit online or via mail to your Secretary of State.

Step 2 — Restate your articles of organization

Though it is not required, filing Restated Articles of Organization may be beneficial especially if you have made multiple amendments to your organizing documents. By restating your Articles of Organization, you are incorporating all amendments into one updated document. If you don’t restate, then you will have an amended Articles of Organization for each amendment you make.

Step 3 — Submit an annual report and change your LLC’s operating agreement

In states that require your company to submit an annual report — or a similar form, such as a Statement of Information — you’ll have to note the amendment you made in the report. Again, this varies by state. Several states, such as Texas, do not require an annual report at all. As a rule of thumb, if you file a report every year, you’ll need to include your amendment within it.

Your LLC may also have an operating agreement defining its members’ roles, responsibilities, and ownership stakes. That agreement, though it’s for internal use and not required by most states, should also be updated once you’ve submitted your Articles of Amendment.

Articles of amendment for corporations 

Articles of Amendment for corporations work in much the same way as for LLCs. Some states have separate forms for LLCs and corporations. However, in most places, you’ll use the same form and submit the same details. Just describe the change, provide an effective date, and pay any filing fees. If you’re in a state that requires annual reports, declare your changes there and restate your Articles of Incorporation to include the changes.

The only real difference usually pertains to the involvement of your corporation’s board of directors. For many amendments, your board may need to vote on changes. Assuming the motion passes, submit your forms to the Secretary of State or your state’s Corporations Division.

Stay in compliance – update your BOI report today.

Don’t forget: update your boi report.

As of January 1, 2024, small businesses may have an extra filing requirement when submitting Articles of Amendment. That is, they must update their Beneficial Ownership Information (BOI) report .

Businesses that are created by filing organizing documents with a secretary of state, such as LLCs and corporations, will likely have to submit a BOI report to name the beneficial owners of the business. This report goes to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). This institution uses the report to ensure the business isn’t a front for money laundering or similar crimes.

The report asks for details about your company, including its name and address. If your Articles of Amendment change any of these details, you must file an updated BOI report within 30 days of the change. Willful failure to file a BOI report may result in severe penalties. These include imprisonment and up to $10,000 in fines. Don’t forget this crucial step. You may also want to seek the advice of an attorney who can review your specific circumstances and guide your decisions to confirm that you are doing what’s right for you.

What are articles of amendment?

The Articles of Amendment is a document that allows you to file for a change in your LLC or corporation , such as a change in business name or address.

What is the difference between articles of amendment and articles of incorporation?

Articles of Incorporation are the initial formation documents you submit when creating your corporation, whereas Articles of Amendment allow you to change the details in those formation documents.

How do you amend articles of incorporation?

Typically, you’ll use your state’s Articles of Amendment forms to make a business amendment to your formation documents.

What is the purpose of an amendment to the articles of incorporation?

Articles of Amendment are usually used to change a company’s name, address, or registered agent.

When should I file an amendment?

It’s generally a good idea to file your amendment as soon as possible after changing your business or its structure. Some states have requirements for how soon after a change you must file an amendment.

Can I file an amendment online?

Most states have online services that allow you to file Articles of Amendment and other business documents.

How long does it take to file an amendment?

After completing the forms, you’ll likely have to wait several business days for confirmation of your amendment to arrive.

This article is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. You may want to seek the advice of an attorney to evaluate all relevant considerations. 

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How to Amend Articles of Incorporation

Last Updated: March 12, 2023

This article was co-authored by Michael R. Lewis . Michael R. Lewis is a retired corporate executive, entrepreneur, and investment advisor in Texas. He has over 40 years of experience in business and finance, including as a Vice President for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas. He has a BBA in Industrial Management from the University of Texas at Austin. This article has been viewed 95,538 times.

Articles of Incorporation is the document that a business files with its home state in order to become a corporation. [1] X Research source The articles include general information about the business such as its name, address, and the names of the officers. Sometimes, there may be a need for a corporation to amend or change the information contained within the Articles of Incorporation, such as when there's a change of address. The rules and procedures for amending the Articles may vary slightly from state to state, but generally remain the same throughout the United States.

Preparing for the Change

Step 1 Review your corporation's bylaws.

  • If your corporation is highly political, you should get advice from influential board members first before simply scheduling a vote. They're much more likely to support the change if they feel like they've had input in creating the change.

Step 3 Create the proposed change.

  • Be sure to use language similar to what's already in the Articles of Incorporation. It should be presented as a rule in rule book. [3] X Trustworthy Source US National Park Service Agency responsible for the maintenance and promotion of national parks and monuments Go to source
  • It's a good idea to get the input of an attorney who specializes in corporate law when you're submitting a change to the Articles of Incorporation.

Proposing the Change at the Board Meeting

Step 1 Ensure that quorum is at the board meeting.

Fulfilling the Formalities

Step 1 Prepare the actual amendment.

  • This process will cost money. The Secretary of State's website should tell you how much it costs. Write out a check for that amount and send it with the amendment.

Step 3 Attach the amendment to the original Articles of Incorporation.

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  • ↑ http://www.investopedia.com/terms/a/articlesofincorporation.asp
  • ↑ https://www.freeadvice.com/legal/what-are-corporate-by-laws/
  • ↑ http://www.nps.gov/partnerships/model_articles.htm

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Meet your state's requirements.

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Keep the public updated

Your articles are publicly available, so make sure they're current for your partners, vendors, and lenders.

Change your stock info

Many states require corporations to keep their authorized stock up to date.

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Amended Articles of Incorporation Change of Address

Articles of Incorporation are the required documentation a business must file to become a corporation. 3 min read updated on February 01, 2023

What are amended articles of incorporation change of address? Articles of Incorporation are the required documentation a business must file to become a corporation. Amendments to the Articles of Incorporation require a specific set of steps to be followed.

To establish Articles of Incorporation, the laws of the state where the incorporation will take place must be adhered to. These requirements typically include the following:

  • Name of the corporation
  • Start date and duration, which is normally listed as perpetual (no end date)
  • Type of corporation (stock or non-stock)
  • Initial stock share information
  • Corporation registered agent name and address. This is the person who is authorized to receive any business correspondences.
  • Names and addresses of the person in charge (incorporator) and initial directors

By incorporating a business, you are creating a legal separation between the company and the company's owners, directors, and officers. Additionally, incorporation provides businesses with several benefits regarding asset protection, long-term planning, and taxes.

Amendments to Corporate Articles

Articles of Incorporation must be amended to alert the state to major changes. Changes that qualify for state notification include changes to:

  • company name
  • company purpose
  • stock information

If a company fails to update their Articles of Incorporation they will be in violation of state law. In this case, the Secretary of State has the power to invalidate the business as a separate legal entity. This extreme legal headache is easily avoided by amending the Articles of Incorporation . To determine the process and confirm what requires a modification of the Articles of Incorporation refer to the Secretary of State requirements.

By properly updating any name or address changes, you are allowing the Secretary of State the chance to contact you regarding any pertinent legal matters, tax issues, or other information that your company must be aware of in a timely fashion. Without a proper communication stream, the company may fall into an unintentional legal issue due to the lack of response.

How to Amend Articles of Incorporation

1. Review the bylaws of the corporation. The bylaws will list the requirements and steps needed to amend the Articles of Incorporation. It is important to review all listed requirements and processes to legally make amendments.

2. A board of directors meeting must be scheduled. Changes will require approval from the board of directors. This is why a meeting is required to hear and vote on the potential amendment change. Ample notification time should be given to ensure that board members can attend and are aware of the importance of the meeting. In some cases, a summary of the change should be included in the notification.

3. Write the proposed changes. The written changes must be done by a valued and trusted source who will properly craft the amendment. Before submission to the board of directors, the writing should be fully reviewed and it should mirror the language that was used in the original Articles of Incorporation.

4. Confirm that the board meeting has enough members attending to have a quorum so the amendment can be voted on.

5. Propose the amendment during the board meeting. During the discussion, review the wording and the reason as to why the changes need to be made. All board members should be given the ability and time to provide feedback.

6. Vote on the amendment. The final vote and passage of the amendment of the Articles of Incorporation are dependent on the bylaws. This will give the number of votes needed to approve and pass the amendment. You can then move to the next step.

7. Prepare the actual and final amendment. The Secretary of State in the state where the business is incorporated will offer the proper steps and paperwork required on their website. Download the required template, usually listed under "corporate forms" or similar then refer to the language requirements to write and complete the amendment.

8. File the Amendment. It has to be submitted to the Secretary of State via mail or in-person. There will be a fee attached to this process which will be listed on the Secretary of State's website. Payment should be made via check.

9. Add the amendment to the original copy of the Articles of Incorporation. The amendment is added as a page to make it part of your records.

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When Do I Need to Amend Articles of Incorporation?

In order to have established your client’s business as corporation, you have filed the Articles in the relevant state (and hopefully we provided that service for you). As you know, it is likely that at some point during the life of your client’s business you will be called upon to amend these Articles of Incorporation. Amending the Articles of a business is a common procedure for a corporation.

As a licensed professional (attorney, CPA, enrolled agent), you are aware that when a change needs to be made to your client’s corporation, all states, California included, require that you file a  Certificate of Amendment or Articles of Amendment . Attorneys Corporation Service can assist you in quickly changing this legal document so that your client’s corporation remains in good standing with the state.

What types of additions, alterations, or modifications require the filing of an Amendment with the State? Here are a few:

▪ Changing the name of a state-level entity of a corporation

▪ Changing the authorized share information (number, class, par value)

▪ Changing the principal office address

▪ Changing the names / addresses of the Directors

▪ Changing the description of the business activities of the corporation

Attorneys Corporation Service, Inc. can assist you in filing your client’s Amendment quickly and affordably, no matter the reason. Simply fax, email, or email us your  Corporate Amendment  and we will get started on filing your amended Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Organization. Give us a try — We ensure a quicker turn around time than if you were to send your Amendment to the Secretary of State directly.

Attorneys Corporation Service, Inc. provides fast, reliable formation services and quality products for all 50 states. We also provide solutions for tough filing assignments. Call us at  800.462.5487  or check us out online at AttorneysCorpService.com.

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To understand what’s good about the act, it’s necessary to understand the legal ambiguities that now exist on campus. “No person in the United States,” Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states , “shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” There is no corresponding federal prohibition on discrimination on the basis of religion.

The problem is immediately obvious. Jewishness doesn’t fit neatly into any of those three categories. Israelis of all races, religions and ethnicities are protected because of their national origin, but what about American Jews? Judaism is a religion, and religion isn’t covered. Jewishness is more of an ancestry than a “race” or a “color” — there are Jews of many races and colors.

Both the Trump and the Biden administrations attempted to solve the problem by interpreting Title VI to apply to antisemitism, at least in some circumstances. The Trump administration issued an executive order stating that “discrimination against Jews may give rise to a Title VI violation when the discrimination is based on an individual’s race, color or national origin.” Biden’s Department of Education has interpreted Title VI to apply when students “experience discrimination, including harassment,” on the basis of their “shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics.”

But these statements — even if fairly rooted in the text of Title VI — are not a solution. Executive orders and administrative regulations are more ephemeral than federal statutes. The next president (or one elected in 2036 or 2052) may choose to interpret Title VI differently. Biden’s interpretation is broader than Trump’s, for example. Courts will also have their own say, and they are now less deferential to presidential interpretations of the law than they’ve been in decades.

There is an answer to the problem. Congress should pass legislation clearly stating that antisemitism is included in the scope of Title VI. This change would remove discretion from presidents and clarify the law for the courts. It would provide bedrock legal protection for Jewish students across the United States.

The best parts of the Antisemitism Awareness Act explicitly incorporate discrimination based on “actual or perceived shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics” into federal statutory law, elevating the legal protections well beyond the executive orders and guidance letters of previous administrations. If the law had stopped there — or even if it had gone further and explicitly stated that discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived Jewish identity is by definition discrimination on the basis of shared ancestry, then it would be a vital addition to federal law.

But the law did not stop there. It goes on to require schools to consider the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s working definition of antisemitism when determining whether there has been a violation of Title VI. This is a serious mistake. The alliance’s definition includes examples of antisemitism that encompass a broad range of statements that are protected by the First Amendment.

For example, it is wrong and immoral to denounce the state of Israel as a “racist endeavor,” but that is constitutionally protected speech. So is the ancient Christian libel that Jews are collectively responsible for killing Jesus. So is the claim that the state of Israel is comparable to Nazis. And so is the assertion that Jews are more loyal to Israel than their home countries. Those statements are all examples of antisemitism in the alliance’s definition — and I believe they are actually antisemitic — but if public colleges and universities punish students simply for engaging in such expression, then they’ll violate the First Amendment.

The definitions don’t just implicate the First Amendment, they also breed confusion around the very concept of harassment itself. Hearing unpleasant or even hateful thoughts or ideas isn’t “harassment.” That’s an inescapable part of life in a free, pluralistic nation. Harassment is something else entirely.

In a 1999 case, Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education , the Supreme Court defined student-on-student harassment under Title IX (the federal statute prohibiting sex discrimination in federally funded education) as conduct “so severe, pervasive and objectively offensive, and that so undermines and detracts from the victims’ educational experience, that the victims are effectively denied equal access to an institution’s resources and opportunities.”

Harassment doesn’t depend so much on the content or viewpoint of the objectionable speech as where, when and how it happens. If students chant, “Globalize the intifada,” at a lawful public protest, then that’s protected. If they shout down Jewish students in class using the same phrase, or chant it outside the dorm rooms of Jewish students at 3 a.m., then they’re engaging in harassment. Jewish students can’t study or sleep on an equal basis with other students.

In both of those circumstances, the actual content of the words is less important than the timing and the targets. A person can commit an act of antisemitic harassment if he targets Jewish students with words that have nothing to do with ancestry or ethnicity. For example, if someone stands outside a Jewish student’s room night after night yelling, “Michael Jordan is the GOAT” relentlessly so that the student can’t sleep or targets her Jewish roommate with constant interruption and distraction then she’s engaging in antisemitic harassment not because of the content or viewpoint of the words, but rather because of the identity of the target and the time and manner of the speech.

In that sense, the Antisemitism Awareness Act is both overinclusive and underinclusive. By sweeping constitutionally protected speech into the statute, it can cause schools to unlawfully suppress speech. By incorporating the alliance’s explicit lists of “examples” of antisemitism, it can cause schools to ignore other forms of harassment.

And that brings us back to the ugliness of the moment. The instant that the House passed the bill, social media lit up with objections. Principled civil libertarians on the right and left raised the same objection that I am raising now — the act can suppress free speech. But the far right went much further and used the passage of the act as an opportunity to spew its antisemitism all over the internet.

Representative Matthew Gaetz, for example, posted that “the Gospel itself would meet the definition of antisemitism under the terms of this bill!” Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene said the bill “could convict Christians of antisemitism for believing the Gospel that says Jesus was handed over to Herod to be crucified by the Jews.”

Charlie Kirk, the founder of Turning Point USA, asked on X, “Did the House of Representatives just make parts of the Bible illegal?” Tucker Carlson responded , “Yes, the New Testament.”

These complaints are absurd. The Romans crucified Jesus, and while in the biblical account there were certainly Jews who wanted to crucify Jesus, Jesus was a Jew and so were his early disciples. The idea that “the Jews” writ large bear enduring responsibility for Christ’s death isn’t “the Gospel.” It’s blood libel.

The MAGA reaction was particularly nonsensical given that the Trump administration used the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism in its own executive order, and the text of the Antisemitism Awareness Act reflects much of that same language. The Gospel wasn’t outlawed under Trump, and it’s not outlawed by the bill, either.

My heart breaks for my Jewish friends and fellow citizens. Many millions feel under siege regardless of their stance on the war. The pain of the worst massacre of Jews since the Holocaust has been magnified by a wave of antisemitism at home aimed at people who have nothing at all to do with the military policies of the Israeli government. And now even federal efforts to combat antisemitism are triggering waves of fresh abuse.

The ball is now in the Senate’s court, and the Senate majority leader, Chuck Schumer, has noted that there are “ objections on both sides ” to the legislation. But he appears open to compromise. “We’re going to look for the best way to move forward,” he said.

If I may, I’d like to humbly offer a better way. Strip the problematic incorporation of the alliance’s antisemitism definition and examples from the bill entirely. Instead, simply amend Title VI itself to make it explicit that discrimination based on “actual or perceived shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics” is prohibited by the statute and that antisemitic discrimination meets that definition.

And that’s it. That should be the whole bill. There is no need for examples or definitions of antisemitism because these definitions both threaten free speech and don’t come close to capturing all the myriad ways in which antisemites can and do discriminate against Jews on campus. By revising Title VI, you protect Jewish students from the evolving priorities of future administrations, and you make it plain that American law gives no purchase to antisemitic harassment.

Crucially, by revising Title VI to clearly prohibit discrimination against Jews without any further amplification or definition, antisemitic harassment will fit neatly into existing case law that has longed harmonized free speech principles and nondiscrimination law. The First Amendment has existed side by side on public campuses with Title VI for generations, and we largely know the proper distinctions between free speech and discriminatory harassment.

American Jewish students need robust legal protection from discrimination and harassment. Those protections should be no more and no less than the protections we provide Black students, white students and students from any other race or nationality. The Antisemitism Awareness Act goes too far, but it’s easily fixed. And it must be fixed to fully protect American Jews from the vile hatred that is spreading across our land.

Some other stuff I did

My Sunday column was about the lessons learned from the clash between Mike Johnson and Marjorie Taylor Greene over Ukraine aid and her threats to oust Johnson from the speaker’s chair. Johnson is clearly winning — at least so long as Trump stays on the sidelines — and this holds lessons for the staying power of MAGA after Trump leaves the scene:

The scandals and conspiracies that don’t seem to touch Trump at all can still bring down other Republicans, including the MAGA candidates who hug Trump the hardest. It turns out that the vaunted ideological change of the Republican Party from Reaganite conservatism to America First and working-class populism may well be overblown.

This makes the 2024 election all the more crucial. If Trump wins, MAGA has four more years to consolidate its hold on the Republican Party and transform the conservative movement from the inside out. But if Trump loses, the battle is joined once again.

I don’t want to bore you with all my podcast and media appearances, but I’ll highlight two. On Tuesday I spoke to PBS’s Lisa Desjardins about the proper response to campus protests. It’s a short conversation, but we went as deep as we could on the distinctions between free speech, civil disobedience, and outright lawlessness and rebellion.

For something completely different, I spoke to a very sharp college student named Andrew Xu about masculinity, gender roles and the role that religious institutions can play in cultivating character. It’s difficult to find the right solutions for the plight of millions of young men, but it’s imperative that we try.

David French is an Opinion columnist, writing about law, culture, religion and armed conflict. He is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and a former constitutional litigator. His most recent book is “Divided We Fall: America’s Secession Threat and How to Restore Our Nation .” You can follow him on Threads ( @davidfrenchjag ).

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  1. How Do I Change My Corporate Articles of Incorporation?

    First, a proposal must be prepared and presented to the company board of directors.; The board adopts a corporate resolution approving the proposal.; If there are shareholders or members, they must vote on the change.The vote usually takes place at a formal meeting of the corporation (annual meeting or other) and shareholders must be advised of the proposed change before the meeting.

  2. Making changes to an LLC by filing articles of amendment

    To make any changes, the LLC must file articles of amendment—also sometimes called a certificate of amendment or a certificate of change—with the state. The articles of amendment document is easy to prepare. Information typically required includes: the business name as it appears on the articles of organization. the date of organization.

  3. How to File Articles of Amendment

    States normally provide the forms you need, but if not, we have a free LLC Articles of Amendment template you can download or use as a model. Typically, Articles of Amendment include the following information: Entity name and state. Date of amendment. Article number being amended. Statement that the article cited is being amended. Amendment

  4. Free Amendment to Articles of Incorporation Form

    An Amendment to Articles of Incorporation is formally filed when updates, additions, or other modifications are needed to alter the original content of the articles. Such changes may include, but are not limited to, alterations to stock information. The primary purpose of this amendment is to ensure that your Articles of Incorporation accurately represent your company's current structure and ...

  5. How to file Articles of Amendment

    Step 3 — Submit an annual report and change your LLC's operating agreement. In states that require your company to submit an annual report — or a similar form, such as a Statement of Information — you'll have to note the amendment you made in the report. Again, this varies by state. Several states, such as Texas, do not require an ...

  6. How to Amend Articles of Incorporation: 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    Be sure that enough board members are at the meeting so that you can vote on the amendment. 2. Propose the amendment at the board meeting. Be sure to discuss the wording of the change at the board meeting as well as the reason for the change. Give every board member a chance to offer feedback. 3.

  7. Amendment to Articles of Incorporation

    An amendment to your corporation's Articles of Incorporation is filed when you need to update, add to, or otherwise change the original content of your articles. Amendments are important corporate filings as they are required to modify essential corporate information, such as changes to stock information. We offer a fill-in-the-blank template ...

  8. Changing Bylaws and Articles of Incorporation: How and Why

    The amendment process for corporate bylaws is usually easier than changing the articles of incorporation because the approval or voting requirements are often less stringent. Bylaw amendments also do not have to be filed with the Secretary of State, so businesses can skip over more formal requirements and filing fees.

  9. Corporate Amendments

    Make business changes official. Update your business's name, address, and more by filing articles of amendment with the state. We'll help you take care of it in a few simple steps. Starts at $129 + filing fees. We've helped companies keep their info up to date over 55,000 times.

  10. LLC Articles of Amendment

    Our LLC Articles of Organization template includes the following key information: LLC name and state. Date of amendment. Article number being amended. Statement that the article cited is being amended. Amendment. Statement that other sections of the articles remain in full force and effect. Member names and signatures.

  11. How to Update Articles of Organization

    Obtain Approval for the Update as Required by the LLC's Operating Agreement. Complete Appropriate Government Forms to Change the Articles of Organization. File Articles of Amendment with the Appropriate State Agency. Pay Any Fees for the Articles of Amendment to Change an LLC's Information.

  12. PDF Instructions for completing Form CD 100 (Articles of Amendment)

    Filers are strongly urged to seek competent legal counsel in this matter. Article One Name of the corporation Provide the current name of the corporation. Control number Provide the control number of the corporation. Article Two State the amendment Provide the proposed name of the corporation.

  13. How to Amend a California Articles of Incorporation

    Step 2: Review the requirements for your California amendment. To amend your Articles of Incorporation, you will need to file a California Certificate of Incorporation amendment (Certificate of Amendment). You can update the information included in your Articles of Incorporation by filing the Certificate of Amendment with the Secretary of State.

  14. Articles of Amendment Form Instructions

    to change the name of the business. Article numbers are found on your original Articles of Incorporation, but describing the amendment without the Article number is acceptable. THE AMENDMENT WAS ADOPTED ON: This cannot be a future date, but it can be today's date. PLEASE CHECK THE APPROPRIATE STATEMENT: One of the three options must be chosen.

  15. Amended Articles of Incorporation Change of Address

    File the Amendment. It has to be submitted to the Secretary of State via mail or in-person. There will be a fee attached to this process which will be listed on the Secretary of State's website. Payment should be made via check. 9. Add the amendment to the original copy of the Articles of Incorporation.

  16. Writing and Filing the Articles of Incorporation

    The filing fee for a non-profit's articles of incorporation is $30. Once the articles are written and signed, they are ready for filing with your state's secretary of state office. Once accepted, the business becomes a legal entity. Your state might make it official with a certificate of incorporation. It can now receive a business license ...

  17. When Do I Need to Amend Articles of Incorporation?

    Amending the Articles of a business is a common procedure for a corporation. As a licensed professional (attorney, CPA, enrolled agent), you are aware that when a change needs to be made to your client's corporation, all states, California included, require that you file a Certificate of Amendment or Articles of Amendment.

  18. Amending / Restating Nonprofit Articles of Incorporation

    An amendment to the nonprofit articles of incorporation is normally done through a legal instrument called the Articles of Amendment or in some cases such as the State of New York or Texas; Certificate of Amendment. Every state has its own flavor of amendment form, but the procedure is universally the same. The most important thing is to find ...

  19. How To File A California Corporation Amendment

    What state agency do you file an amendment with? California Secretary of State Document Filing Support Unit Mailing address: P.O. Box 944228, Sacramento, CA 94244-2300. Physical address: 1500 11th Street, 3rd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814 Phone: (916) 657-5448.

  20. PDF Instructions for completing Form CD 115 (Articles of Amendment)

    The fee to file articles of amendment is $20.00. Articles of amendment may be filed online at https://ecorp.sos.ga.gov/ or filed by paper by submitting this completed form to our office. There is a $10.00 service charge for filing by paper. Corporations Division, 2 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. SE, Suite 313 West Tower, Atlanta, Georgia 30334.

  21. How to Write Articles of Incorporation (Step-by-Step)

    Double-check the spelling, addresses, and other details before proceeding to the next step. 3. Submit Filing Check. Once you draft your articles of incorporation, it's time to take care of the filing fees. The Secretary of State's office requires filing fees to process and review your articles of incorporation.

  22. PDF Articles of Amendment

    Amendment for the purpose of amending its Articles of Incorporation. 1. The name of the corporation is: 2. The text of each amendment adopted is as follows (State below or attach): 3. If an amendment provides for an exchange, reclassification, or cancellation of issued shares, provisions for implementing the

  23. Opinion

    Last week, the Antisemitism Awareness Act, a bill intended to protect Jewish students from discrimination on campus, passed with broad bipartisan support. The law is motivated by good intentions ...

  24. How To File An Amendment For A Georgia Corporation

    Submit the original amendment and a copy to the SOS by mail or in person. The Georgia SOS accepts check, certified bank check, or money order. The SOS does not accept cash. The filing fee should be payable to "Secretary of State.". Some information in the articles of incorporation can only be changed when you file the annual registration.