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Chicago Citation Style (17th Edition): Two or Three Authors or Editors

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Book with Two or Three Authors or Editors (pp. 695-696)

The general format below refers to a book with two authors.  

If you are dealing with two editors instead of two authors, insert the names of the editors into the place where the authors' names are now, followed by a comma and the word "eds." without the quotation marks.  The rest of the format remains the same.

General Format 

1. Author First Name/Initial Surname and Author First Name/Initial Surname,  Book Title: Subtitle   (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page #.

Concise Note:  

2. Author Surname and Author Surname,  Book Title , page #. 

Bibliography:

Author Surname, First Name/Initial, and Author First Name/Initial Surname.  Book Title: Subtitle . Place of       Publication: Publisher, Year.

1. Liam P. Unwin and Joseph Galloway,  Peace In Ireland  (Boston: Stronghope Press, 1990), 139.  

Concise Note:

2. Unwin and Galloway,  Peace in Ireland , 139.

Unwin, Liam P., and Joseph Galloway.  Peace in Ireland . Boston: Stronghope  Press, 1990.  

Formatting of papers in Chicago Style:

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Citations and bibliographies in Chicago Style:

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About Citing Books

This guide is intended to cover only the Notes and Bibliography system for citing books.

For each type of source in this guide, both the general form and a specific example will be provided.

The following format will be used:

Full Note  - use the first time that you cite a source. Concise Note  - use after the first time you cite a source. Bibliography  - use when you are compiling the Bibliography that appears at the end of your paper.

Information on citing and several of the examples were drawn from  The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) . 

Numbers in parentheses refer to specific pages in the manual.

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Chicago Citation Style, 17th Edition: Multiple Authors or Editors

  • Bibliography
  • One Author or Editor
  • Multiple Authors or Editors
  • Author and Editor
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  • Organization as Author
  • Anonymous Work
  • Chapter from an Edited Work
  • Multivolume Work
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  • Dictionary or Encyclopedia
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  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • Book Review
  • Basic Webpage
  • Blogs and Social Media
  • Government Website
  • Audio/Video Recording
  • Online Multimedia
  • Interview or Personal Communication
  • Lecture or Presentation
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Multiple Authors or Editors (14.76)

Example 1 – Two or Three Authors

N:           1. Catherine Margaret Orr and Ann Braithwaite,  Introducing Women's and Gender Studies: Concepts for Everyday Use  (London: Routledge, 2014), 203.

B:    Orr, Catherine Margaret, and Ann Braithwaite.  Introducing Women's and Gender Studies: Concepts for              Everyday Use . London: Routledge, 2014.

Example 2 – Two or Three Editors

N:           1. Frank Tallett and D. J. B. Trim, eds., European Warfare, 1350-1750  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 111-12.

B:     Tallett, Frank, and D. J. B. Trim, eds.  European Warfare, 1350-1750 . Cambridge: Cambridge University              Press, 2010.

Example 3 – Four to Ten Authors or Editors

N:            1. Julie Evans et al.,  Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights: Indigenous Peoples in British Settler Societies  (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003),  29.

B:     Evans, Julie ,  Patricia Grimshaw ,  David Philips , and  Shurlee Swain .  Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights:              Indigenous Peoples in British Settler Societies.  Manchester:  Manchester University Press,  2003.

NOTE: For sources with more than ten authors or editors, include only the first seven in the bibliography, followed by  et al .

Help & Guide Contents

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Chicago Manual of Style 17th Edition

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This section contains information on The Chicago Manual of Style  (CMOS) method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style (17t h e dition), which was issued in 2017.

Please note that although these resources reflect the most recent updates in the The Chicago Manual of Style  (17 th  edition) concerning documentation practices, you can review a full list of updates concerning usage, technology, professional practice, etc. at  The Chicago Manual of Style Online .

Introduction

The Chicago Manual of Style  (CMOS) covers a variety of topics from manuscript preparation and publication to grammar, usage, and documentation, and as such, it has been lovingly dubbed the “editor's bible.”

The material on this page focuses primarily on one of the two CMOS documentation styles: the Notes-Bibliography System (NB) , which is used by those working in literature, history, and the arts. The other documentation style, the Author-Date System, is nearly identical in content but slightly different in form and is preferred by those working in the social sciences.

Though the two systems both convey all of the important information about each source, they differ not only in terms of the way they direct readers to these sources, but also in terms of their formatting (e.g., the position of dates in citation entries). For examples of how these citation styles work in research papers, consult our sample papers: 

Author-Date Sample Paper

NB Sample Paper

In addition to consulting  The Chicago Manual of Style  (17th edition) for more information, students may also find it useful to consult Kate L. Turabian's  Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations  (8th edition). This manual, which presents what is commonly known as the "Turabian" citation style, follows the two CMOS patterns of documentation but offers slight modifications suited to student texts.

Notes and Bibliography (NB) in Chicago style

The Chicago Notes and Bibliography (NB) system is often used in the humanities to provide writers with a system for referencing their sources through the use of footnotes, endnotes, and through the use of a bibliography. This offers writers a flexible option for citation and provides   an outlet for commenting on those sources, if needed. Proper use of the Notes and Bibliography system builds a writer’s credibility by demonstrating their accountability to source material. In addition, it can protect writers from accusations of plagiarism, which is the intentional or accidental uncredited use of source material created by others.

Introduction to Notes

In the Notes and Bibliography system, you should include a note (endnote or footnote) each time you use a source, whether through a direct quote, paraphrase, or summary. Footnotes are added at the end of the page on which the source is referenced, while endnotes are compiled at the end of each chapter or at the end of the entire document.

In either case, a superscript number corresponding to a note, along with the bibliographic information for that source, should be placed in the text following the end of the sentence or clause in which the source is referenced.

If a work includes a bibliography, which is typically preferred, then it is not necessary to provide full publication details in notes. However, if a bibliography is not included with a work, the first note for each source should include  all  relevant information about the source: author’s full name, source title, and facts of publication. If you cite the same source again, or if a bibliography is included in the work, the note only needs to include the surname of the author, a shortened form of the title (if more than four words), and the page number(s). However, in a work that does not include a bibliography, it is recommended that the full citation be repeated when it is first used in a new chapter.

In contrast to earlier editions of CMOS, if you cite the same source two or more times consecutively, CMOS recommends using shortened citations. In a work with a bibliography, the first reference should use a shortened citation which includes the author’s name, the source title, and the page number(s), and consecutive references to the same work may omit the source title and simply include the author and page number. Although discouraged by CMOS, if you cite the same source and page number(s) from a single source two or more times consecutively, it is also possible to utilize the word “Ibid.,” ( from the Latin ibidem, which means “in the same place,”) as the corresponding note. If you use the same source but a draw from different new page, the corresponding note should use “Ibid.” followed by a comma and the new page number(s).

In the NB system, the footnote or endnote itself begins with the appropriate full-sized number, followed by a period and then a space.

Introduction to Bibliographies

In the NB system, the bibliography provides an alphabetical list of all sources used in a given work. This page, most often titled Bibliography, is usually placed at the end of the work preceding the index. It should include all sources cited within the work and may sometimes include other relevant sources that were not cited but provide further reading.

Although bibliographic entries for various sources may be formatted differently, all included sources (books, articles, websites, etc.) are arranged alphabetically by author’s last name. If no author or editor is listed, the title or, as a last resort, a descriptive phrase may be used.

Though useful, a bibliography is not required in works that provide full bibliographic information in the notes.

Common Elements

All entries in the bibliography will include the author (or editor, compiler, translator), title, and publication information.

Author Names

The author’s name is inverted in the bibliography, placing the last name first and separating the last name and first name with a comma; for example, John Smith becomes Smith, John.

Titles of books and journals are italicized. Titles of articles, chapters, poems, etc. are placed in quotation marks .

Publication Information

The year of publication is listed after the publisher or journal name .

Punctuation

In a bibliography, all major elements are separated by periods.

For more information and specific examples, see the sections on  Books  and  Periodicals .

Please note that this OWL resource provides basic information regarding the formatting of entries used in the bibliography. For more information about Selected Bibliographies, Annotated Bibliographies, and Bibliographic Essays, please consult Chapter 14.61 of  The Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).

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Book with Two or Three Authors or Editors (Sec. 14.76)

If your work has two editors instead of two authors, insert the names of the editors into the place where the authors' names are now, followed by a comma and the word "eds." without the quotation marks.

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COMMENTS

  1. Two or Three Authors or Editors

    The general format below refers to a book with two authors. If you are dealing with two editors instead of two authors, insert the names of the editors into the place where the authors' names are now, followed by a comma and the word "eds." without the quotation marks.

  2. Library: Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.): Multiple Authors

    With four or more authors cite all in the bibliography, but in the note cite only the first author followed by et al. In the bibliography invert the first and last name of only the first author. If no page numbers are included then section headings or other types of locating information can be used.

  3. Chicago Citation Style, 17th Edition: Multiple Authors or Editors

    Chicago Citation Style, 17th Edition: Multiple Authors or Editors Multiple Authors or Editors (14.76) Example 1 – Two or Three Authors N: 1. Catherine Margaret Orr and Ann Braithwaite, Introducing Women's and Gender Studies: Concepts for Everyday Use (London: Routledge, 2014), 203. B: Orr, Catherine Margaret, and Ann Braithwaite.

  4. Chicago Manual of Style 17th Edition

    This section contains information on The Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style (17t h e dition), which was issued in 2017.

  5. B. Two or Three Authors or Editors

    This guide will show you how to cite your sources using the Chicago citation style. It is based on the 17th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style. It provides selected citation examples for commonly used sources in the of notes/bibliography style.