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How to Write a Cover Letter When You’re Changing Careers (Sample + Tips)

As a career changer, you need to help recruiters understand why you’re moving away from your former line of work and what you want to achieve in your new career path..

[Featured Image] A man in a blue button-up is sitting down in a conference room holding pieces of paper.

Over the course of your career, you will inevitably change jobs as you seek out more responsibility, growth, or even a higher salary. In fact, the average employee stays at each job for around four years, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics [ 1 ]. But for career changers—or those who are interested in exploring an entirely new path or industry—making that switch can sometimes involve unique challenges. 

Even so, making a career change has become an increasingly popular move. More than half of workers in the United States anticipated looking for a new opportunity in 2022 [ 2 ]. Changing careers can provide you with an opportunity to find more meaningful work, better align your career path with your larger goals, and move into a role that feels more energizing.  

When you draft your cover letter to apply for a job in a new line of work, it’s important that you take time to explain your larger objectives. In this article, we’ll go over specific information you can feature in your cover letter to help recruiters understand your goals and reasons for changing careers. 

Learn more: How to Plan for a Career Change: Step-by-Step Guide

Information to include in your career change cover letter 

A cover letter is a chance to expand upon the bullet points you’ve outlined on your resume . It’s a space where you can explain your interest in both the role and company, highlight your experience and skills, and sell a recruiter on the overall fit you’d make. 

But a career changer needs to do all of that and more. You also need to help recruiters and hiring managers understand why you’re moving away from your former line of work, what you want to achieve in your new career path, and any transferable skills that will help make your transition a smooth one. 

Let’s review four key pieces of information you can weave into your career change cover letter.  

Career change context

Explaining why you’re interested in changing careers and how the role you’re applying to fits within your larger career aspirations can preemptively contextualize your story. Plan to include a career change objective somewhere in your cover letter, much like you would a resume objective to provide a short summary of a person’s experience and goals. Don’t be afraid to build in a sense of personality so that recruiters can better connect you with your objective.  

What this looks like: I’ve spent the last six years translating complex topics for an array of users as a technical writer. But in that time, I’ve realized that what really drives me is the user’s experience. It’s the lightbulb moment behind my career change to UX design . I believe I’ll make a strong addition to your team because my work has largely put the user front and center, and now I’m interested in focusing on a different facet of that goal. 

Certificates, courses, or trainings

It costs over $4,000 to hire an employee, according to the Society for Human Resources Management [ 3 ]. That’s all the more reason why recruiters and hiring managers want to find the right candidate. It can be costly otherwise. Help explain what you’ve done to prepare for your career change by highlighting any professional certificates or trainings you’ve completed to prepare you for your new line of work. 

What this looks like: In order to familiarize myself with the tools and processes used in data analysis, I completed the Google Data Analytics Professional Certificate , which taught me SQL and R, and trained me to clean and visualize data. Thanks to this preparation, I feel confident that I will make a strong addition to your team from the very start.  

Transferable skills 

Transferable skills are “portable,” in that you take them from job to job. They include problem-solving, critical thinking, attention to detail, and more. Show recruiters that you have important skills to help you do the job so they can understand the unique value you’d bring to their company.  

It can also help to find out the key technical skills the job requires and spend time learning what you can, especially when it comes to important software or tools. 

What this looks like: As a software developer, I regularly relied on my problem-solving skills to think through complex issues. I’ll bring that same skill, as well as my attention to detail, listening, and decision making, to ABC High School as the new algebra teacher. 

Past achievements 

Any time you can highlight what you’ve managed to accomplish in your past roles, you help a recruiter see your potential in a new role. Where possible, summarize any moments that showcase your strengths and illustrate your work ethic or character. 

What this looks like: I pride myself on being a team player as well as a problem-solver. When I worked as a social media manager at Company X, I identified a better program to help my team schedule content. Using that tool improved my team’s efficacy, which in turn led to our most successful quarter to date. 

Why a cover letter is so important for career changers 

The idea of a career path can be rigid at times, suggesting that people only follow one specific track. Although that perspective is starting to shift, it’s still prevalent. You can help recruiters and hiring managers understand more about your interest in a role by explaining why you’re changing careers and what you’ve done to streamline your transition. 

In fact, it helps to align your cover letter with a resume objective, which can be especially useful for career changers. An objective on your resume is a place where you can contextualize your larger career aims, quickly summarizing what you’re hoping to achieve in your next role. Repeat that same information in your cover letter and expand on it slightly, to give your application materials more cohesiveness.  

Read more: How to Use Resume Sections to Shape Your Professional Story

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Career change cover letter sample

It's common practice nowadays to submit your cover letter digitally. In that case, include some of your contact information in the top left corner so recruiters can easily see how to get in touch.

Thomas Bennett

Nashville, TN

(555) 555-1234

[email protected]

Dear Ms. Tufte,

I’m writing to apply for the project manager role at Company X. I initially began my career as a marketing coordinator and eventually moved into email marketing , where I was responsible for strategizing and developing new campaigns. But in that time, I came to realize how much I thrived when it came to managing our quarterly campaigns from start to finish. That’s why I’m interested in segueing into project management. 

Knowing that, despite my experience, I still needed to learn more specifically about project management, I completed the Google Project Management Professional Certificate . Over six months, I’ve learned Agile project management as well as how to create product documentation, among other key skills. I believe this training, along with my previous experience, will help me transition to a project management role at Company X and make a big impact.   

I’m an organized problem-solver with a sharp eye for detail, all important skills in project management. In fact, I believe my previous work in email marketing provided hands-on training in managing projects, albeit without the official title. I identified new tools to help make my team create more effective quarterly campaigns. As a result, we increased our click-through rate (one of our key metrics) to 1.87 percent, bringing it closer to the industry standard—an immense achievement. 

I’m proud of the foundation I gained through marketing, but in realizing where my true passion lies, I’m keen to transition into a project management role with more growth opportunities. Thank you for your consideration. 

3 ways to strengthen your cover letter 

Much like you would for a standard cover letter, you can strengthen your cover letter as a career changer using the following tips: 

1. Tailor your letter for each role.

You should tailor your resume for each role you apply to, and the same goes for your cover letter. Take time to research the company, find out about aspects of their work that interest you, and insert those details into your cover letter. You should also tailor your experience and skills, highlighting the most relevant skills and accomplishments for each job. 

2. Get specific.

Your cover letter should expand upon your resume, rather than repeating the same information. One way to do this is by giving details about your past achievements. Quantify your impact with numbers, when possible, and explain how these accomplishments make you uniquely qualified for this new role.

3. Use action words. 

Build action words into your resume and your cover letter. Rather than more staid words that don’t capture your unique story or responsibilities, action verbs can liven up your cover letter and make it more enticing to read. Find verbs that succinctly and accurately depict your previous experience.

Continue growing on Coursera 

Brush up on your cover letter writing skills by taking the University of Maryland’s free course, Writing Winning Resumes and Cover Letters . Or develop important skills for an in-demand career with a Professional Certificate from industry leaders like Google, Meta, and IBM. Most certificate programs take less than seven months to complete, and you can start for free with a seven-day, all-access trial.

Article sources

US Bureau of Labor Statistics. “ Employee Tenure in 2020 , https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/tenure.pdf.” Accessed May 19, 2023. 

CNBC. “ The Great Resignation is Likely to Continue , https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/25/great-resignation-55-percent-are-looking-to-change-jobs-over-the-next-year-.html.” Accessed May 19, 2023. 

ADP. “ Calculating the True Cost to Hire Employees , https://www.adp.com/spark/articles/2019/07/calculating-the-true-cost-to-hire-employees.aspx.” Accessed May 19, 2023.

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How to write an impactful cover letter for a career change

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How to write a cover letter for a career change

Career change cover letter examples.

8 tips to write a successful career change cover letter

Learning to navigate career changes

As a job seeker, your primary objective is to stand out from every other candidate — and writing a strong cover letter is a great way to do this.

But if you’re trying to change careers, it might seem more complicated. Crafting a compelling letter for a career change needs to put your best foot forward while explaining how your experience and transferable skills make you the best fit. 

Luckily, like any application, cover letters give you a unique opportunity to make a strong first impression on a prospective employer. They’re your opportunity to spin a perceived drawback into a valuable asset, showing hiring managers your unique perspective and ability to make a change.

Let’s start with the basics. Like any other professional communication, every word of your career change cover letter counts. Your relevant skill set, work experience, and communication style let a recruiter, hiring manager, or potential supervisor know what it’ll be like to work with you. 

Here’s how to use your cover letter to make an impact: 

1. Start with a powerful introduction

The first few lines of your cover letter set the tone and pique your reader's interest (or spur disinterest). Skip generic introductions and aim for an opening line that quickly encapsulates the value you can bring to the new job. It can also reflect your unique personality, within reason.

Don’t be shy about identifying yourself as a career changer. It’s an opportunity to showcase important soft skills — such as courage, intellectual curiosity , and a resilient mindset — and connect relevant experiences with valuable transferable skills . With the right framing, it may be the key to standing out as an interesting candidate.

Here’s an example: “As a seasoned journalist, I’m eager to transition into public relations. I've spent the last 20 years sharpening my critical-thinking, research, and copywriting skills, which will serve me well in this new role.”

2. Develop your full character

Your opening paragraph should include your previous role and new career ambition. Next, it’s time to offer a glimpse of your professional drive and explain in more detail what you bring to a career switch, especially if you’ve been upskilling, taking classes, or attending trainings. This is an opportunity to blend your established reputation with your new career goals. If you’re making the change to pursue your passion or do more meaningful work, putting that fact on diisplay creates a fuller image of your personal values , mission, and vision for the future. 

For example: “I currently manage a team of 50 sales representatives in the constantly evolving healthcare sector. The most fascinating and fulfilling part of my job has always been developing a deep understanding of my client’s needs. Acting as a bridge to better service, consulting with them about updating their tools and training to focus on providing excellent treatment to their patients is so rewarding. I’m excited by the prospect of leveraging my social skills and years of experience working directly with healthcare providers to move into software development for the healthcare sector.” 

3. Show some emotion

woman-channeling-her-emotions-to-write-a-career-change-letter

Carefully placed action verbs and feelings help make your experience jump off the page. Potential employers aren’t just looking for a list of key skills — they want to imagine the person behind them. Choose language that conveys enthusiasm, drive, and work motivation , like “I’ve always been passionate about problem-solving and teamwork” or “I immediately connected with your company’s vision and commitment to sustainability.” 

4. Describe your past performance

Your successes in previous roles are the best predictor of the meaningful work you’ll accomplish in the next one — even if you’re moving to a new industry. Focus on accomplishments that demonstrate flexibility and a learning mindset to help the hiring manager envision a successful transition. You need to make the most out of your letter of interest , portfolio , and resume, so put the highlights on your resume and tell the story in your cover letter. 

For instance: “I oversaw a project to automate sales tracking systems, working with our tech team to evaluate the best strategies for the sales department. The project improved efficiency by 25% and decreased overhead costs by 15%.” 

Metrics quantify the value of your growth mindset and show off important skills like team collaboration , project management , and adaptability. 

5. Align your skills with the job description

Even if you’re at the height of your career, a hiring manager needs to know you can bridge the gap between your current role and the new position. Pay careful attention to the soft and hard skills they mention in the job posting and work them into your career transition cover letter. Don’t embellish for the sake of standing out, but do highlight the skills you can back up with valuable, direct experience. 

6. Write a memorable closing

Your closing is your opportunity to reiterate your excitement about the job opening. Adjectives like “eager,” “excited,” and “thrilled” demonstrate you’re ready to hit the ground running. 

Additionally, your cover letter for switching careers should invite further dialogue with a call to action. For example: “I’m eager to learn more about the role and look forward to sharing how I can bring my unique perspective and years of experience in [industry] to your organization.” 

woman-looking-at-cover-letters-examples-for-career-change

Before digging into your resume or cover letter, a potential employer may peruse your job application or LinkedIn profile to understand your value as a candidate. Your cover letter is your first opportunity to turn a list of skills and experiences into a well-rounded picture of your character. 

The best cover letters balance highlighting your unique personality and perspective with proving you have what it takes to fill the job description. While your letter should represent you, you don’t have to start from scratch. Instead, build your own using a basic structure and templates for inspiration. You can also ask ChatGPT to generate a first draft for you with strategic prompts .

Here’s a general career change cover letter sample to consider:

Dear [hiring manager’s name], 

Thank you for considering my application for [ prospective job title] at [company name]. 

I’ve spent the last [years of experience] learning the ins and outs of [current industry], where I currently work as a [most recent job title]. I gravitated toward [industry] because of my passion for [the factors that pushed you to your current career]. The most fulfilling part of my career has been [transferable skills relevant to the new job posting]. I’ve built my expertise around [relevant skills], which were instrumental in accomplishing [a notable achievement or project]. 

I’m excited to transition into a new career chapter and follow my calling in [new field]. Reading about your company, I immediately connected with [core value]. I’m thrilled by the prospect of contributing [your vision or skills] and am eager to apply my unique perspective as a [current job title] in a new context. 

Attached is my resume. I’m eager to learn more about the company and how my background aligns with your needs.

I look forward to the opportunity to continue the conversation. 

Sincerely, 

[Your name]

When changing careers, you may feel worried about potential red flags in your resume, like career gaps or lack of direct experience . While your technical abilities are important, many recruiters and hiring managers prioritize soft skills , like leadership, critical thinking, and communication. Here’s a cover letter that balances proven soft skills and highlights your excitement to fill the gaps: 

Thank you for the opportunity to apply for [prospective job title] at [company name]. While I’ve developed my career in [industry], my enthusiasm for [relevant interest] combined with my proven [relevant transferable skills] has prepared me for this career path. 

Over the last [years of experience], I’ve cultivated a solid foundation in [relevant skills], which mirror the dynamic demands of [new industry]. 

I’m attracted to [new industry] because of [your interest or inspiration to switch to a new field]. The [specific aspect of your new field] that [company name] embodies deeply resonates with my personal values and professional aspirations. I’ve spent the last [months or years] learning [valuable technical skills or industry knowledge] through [examples of learning experiences, such as a class, seminar, or networking opportunity]. 

Attached is my resume, which underscores my transferable skills and [relevant coursework or certifications]. 

I’m confident that my adaptability, dedication to quality work, and passion for learning position me to hit the ground running and become a strong asset to your team. I look forward to discussing how my excitement and skill set align with your objectives. 

8 tips to write a successful career change cover letter 

a-man-celebrating-after-succesfully-writing-a-letter-for-a-career-change

Now that you have some cover letter examples for changing careers, let’s get into the fine print. Here are eight tips to help your career change cover letter lead to an interview: 

  • Address the letter to the right person: General salutations — like “Dear hiring manager” — may give the impression you’re copying and pasting the same cover letter across several job postings. Likewise, it signals to the reader that you lacked the initiative and dedication to find out more about the role and the hiring team beyond what’s in a brief job posting. Take the time to learn the hiring manager's name and use it to kick off communications. 
  • Keep things short: The objective of your cover letter is to spark a hiring manager’s interest and encourage them to read your resume . Keep your cover letter to a few well-curated paragraphs that balance your unique value with the requisites for the job role. 
  • Research, research, research: The company’s website, social media, and other branded materials can provide insight into the organization’s mission and core values. Aligning your vision with the company’s is a great way to capture a hiring manager’s attention and let them know you fit the company culture .
  • Explain your reasons for changing careers: The courage to take a chance on yourself and switch careers speaks volumes about your character. It’s nothing to shy away from. Highlight the reasons you decided to make the difficult career decision —  your resilience, fortitude, and decisiveness can provide a competitive advantage over more traditional candidates. 
  • Mention new skills: Highlight how you’ve learned about your new industry, acquired technical skills, and prepared for the career switch. Whether it’s a one-day seminar or several months with a career coach , your drive for personal and professional development helps make your case for a smooth transition into a new industry. 
  • Source references: Having a list of professional references and their contact information ready to send to a hiring manager is always a good idea. Carefully choose colleagues who can speak to your passion for your new industry and ability to adapt to change.
  • Align all your communications: Consistency and clarity are important to hiring managers. When your LinkedIn profile, letter of intent , and resume have mismatched skills and work experience, the person reading them may pass you over for a candidate with a profile that’s easier to understand and imagine in the role. Double-check that all your information is up-to-date and consistent across all platforms and lines of communication. 
  • Proofread : An enthralling story about your decision to dive into a new field can be thwarted by a misspelled word or poorly placed comma. Spelling and grammar errors can jeopardize your chances of an interview — hiring managers may worry that a lack of attention to detail could show up in more important areas of your work performance. If you’re not a natural copy editor, double-check your work with a proofreading app like Grammarly.

Learning to navigate career changes 

A career change is a big life decision , no matter where you are in your professional journey. After you’ve settled into your niche, shaking things up at 30, changing careers at 40 or following a new calling in your 50s might feel increasingly overwhelming. 

But it’s never too late to embrace change. Your professional life occupies a big part of your time, energy, and personal identity. You deserve to feel fulfilled — even if that means choosing a road less traveled. Carefully crafting a cover letter for a career change is an effective way to capture a hiring manager's attention from the jump and move one step closer to an exciting new opportunity. 

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

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How To Write the Best Career Change Cover Letter

Switching careers can feel like embarking on a journey into uncharted territory — this is particularly true in the tech industry , where a career change often means navigating an entirely different set of digital tools, work processes, responsibilities, and skills. 

You may have prepared yourself for the challenges ahead, furthered your education, and even identified job postings you believe to be a great fit. But without an excellent career change cover letter, your new professional journey could be stalled before it even begins!

Hiring managers only look at resumes for seven seconds before deciding whether to proceed with the application. So, your cover letter has to make an immediate and lasting impression. 

To help you land the job you’ve been dreaming of, we’ve put together this comprehensive guide on career change cover letters.

Here are the topics we’ll explore —feel free to skip around to the sections that interest you most:

  • What makes it a career change cover letter?
  • How to write a career change cover letter in 8 steps

Career change cover letter example: UX design

  • Career change cover letter example: Frontend development
  • Key takeaways

1. What makes it a career change cover letter?

Before we look at the format and structure of the cover letter, let’s clarify something: it may seem obvious, but what distinguishes traditional cover letters from those written by career changers?

The key difference lies in the way you present yourself and the story you tell. A career change cover letter must demonstrate three main things:

  • Your understanding of the job and industry,
  • your existing skills and experience, and
  • how those can be applied to the new position.

This can be done in several ways, but the most effective cover letters strike a balance between emphasizing transferable skills , demonstrating adaptability, and highlighting your motivation for the career transition. 

Unlike traditional cover letters, they can also address potential concerns about your experience, showcasing your ability to transcend the boundaries of one professional field and excel in another.

2. How to write a career change cover letter in 8 steps

Writing winning cover letters is an art that requires practice, and career-change-specific cover letters are even trickier to tackle. But thankfully, you can follow a few best practices to create a compelling document that will make it easier for potential employers to imagine you in the new role.

This step-by-step guide will walk you through the process of writing an effective cover letter for your career switch, from the opening line to the closing paragraph. So, grab a pen or open up your favorite word processor and write that first draft using the following tips:

1. Address the right person

To avoid using the impersonal salutation, “Dear hiring manager,” take the time to research who will be reading your cover letter. 

If the job ad doesn’t include a name, try searching for the company’s website or LinkedIn page and go to the employees’ section to track down the right person and job title. For example, if you’re applying for a UX designer role , search for “Director of UX Design,” “Creative Director,” or similar.

2. Introduce yourself with a hook

Begin your cover letter with an engaging opening that captures the reader’s attention. 

This could be a statement of your intent, a specific project you’ve recently completed, or a personal connection to the industry that demonstrates your passion and motivation for the career switch. This will set you apart from other candidates and create a memorable first impression.

3. Explain why you’re changing careers

To address your career change head-on, provide a clear rationale for the shift by sharing your personal career change story. For example, you could highlight your enthusiasm for the new field, noting what attracted you to it and any relevant experiences or interests supporting your decision. 

Then, use the power of personal branding to infuse the letter with your unique voice, personality, and vision, focusing on the value you can bring to the new sector. This transparency shows employers you’ve thoughtfully considered the move.

4. Demonstrate understanding of the company

Demonstrate your genuine interest in the organization by showing that you’ve thoroughly researched the company. You can achieve this by discussing its mission statement, values, and recent accomplishments. 

Align your skills, background, and career goals with the company’s objectives to showcase your potential fit within its corporate culture. Doing so will convey your enthusiasm for the role and the organization, increasing your chances of standing out as a suitable candidate.

5. Detail why you’re a great match

A personalized cover letter should also explain why you’re a strong candidate for the position in question. This means identifying the unique qualities that set you apart from other candidates, whether that’s your adaptability, problem-solving abilities, or valuable soft skills that can be applied across various industries. 

Use real-world examples to demonstrate how your skills and past experiences align with the job requirements, and mention how these traits can benefit the company in the long run.

6. Showcase transferable skills

One of the key objectives of your career change cover letter is to demonstrate your value to potential employers in your new field. To do this effectively, pinpoint the skills you’ve acquired in your previous career that are transferable to the new role. 

Use specific examples to illustrate how you’ve applied these skills in different contexts and how they are relevant to your new position. By showcasing your relevant skills and experience, you can effectively demonstrate to employers that you have what it takes to excel in your new career path.

7. Mention relevant professional development

List any skills and knowledge you’ve gained through relevant courses, certifications, or training to showcase your commitment to learning and willingness to invest in your career transition. 

This will set you apart from other aspiring career changers, prove your enthusiasm for the role and help paint a picture of what you can bring to the new position. Doing due diligence upfront will make it easier for potential employers to imagine you in the new role and increase the chances of securing an interview.

8. Conclude on a positive note

When concluding your career change cover letter, it’s essential to end it enthusiastically. For example, name one way you can add value to the company and link it to your overall career vision. 

Finally, thank the hiring manager for considering your application and express your excitement about joining the team. Doing so will show you’re committed to the role and motivated to make a success of your career transition.

3. Career change cover letters example

Want to see cover letter examples that nail these key points? Check out these two samples, written specifically for career changers in the tech sector. Best practice for the email subject line? Put the job title from the job ad along with your full name. 

Career change cover letter: Frontend development

4. key takeaways.

Writing a convincing cover letter that highlights your skills for a role you’re hoping to transition into is an essential step in the job application process. 

A thoughtfully crafted career change cover letter can be the reason why employers take a second look at your resume, despite your limited experience in the new field.

In this article, we’ve gone through the basics of what makes a career change cover letter unique and how to write one tailored to your experience and goals. We’ve also looked at practical tips for structuring your letter and provided examples for your inspiration. 

We hope this guide will give you the confidence to write a standout cover letter and put your best foot forward when applying for jobs.

Looking for more tech-specific application support? Check out our practical guide to crafting the best tech resume , complete with valuable tips and real-world examples.

For further education support on your career change journey, try our free tech short courses ,  or speak directly with a program advisor.

With the help of expert instructors, personalized feedback, and a wealth of learning resources, you’ll soon be ready to tackle even the most complex challenges future employers might throw at you. 

Enjoyed this blog post? We think you’ll like these, too:

  • How To Successfully Change Careers in 2024: Your Step-by-Step Guide
  • The Top 5 Transferable Skills and How They Can Help You
  • How to Build a Personal Brand for Your Tech Career

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How To Write A Career Change Cover Letter (With Examples)

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  • How To Write A Cover Letter For A Job With No Experience In That Field

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Summary. To write a career change cover letter you should first start with a professional header with your information as well as the hiring managers information. Be sure to find the hiring managers name to address the letter but if you are unable to, use their position title. Your opening line should be captivating and catch the readers attention.

Even though changing your career may feel dramatic or drastic, the reality is that it isn’t an unusual step to take. The key, however, is to explain your reasons for the change to the hiring managers in your industry of choice, and your cover letter is one of the best places to do this.

In this article, we’ll walk you through how to write a cover letter for this situation and show you some examples you can use as a reference.

Key Takeaways

Your cover letter should be concise (200-400 words), so you’ll need to grab the reader’s attention and get to the point quickly.

Explain both why you decided to leave your old career and why you chose this particular new one in your cover letter.

Show that you understand the position and company you’re applying to and explain why you’d be a good fit in your cover letter.

How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter

How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter

Career change cover letter example, email cover letter example, tips for writing a career change cover letter, career change cover letter faq, ask the experts.

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Chances are you have researched several different cover letter examples and are still trying to settle on the perfect one. The good news is that all great cover letter templates will have a relatively similar structure. It should formatted in the normal business letter layout .

Remember that cover letters should be short; about half a page long, with 200-400 words (shorter is usually better), and 3-4 paragraphs.

Include the following sections in your cover letter:

Header (only for physical copies of your cover letter)

Opening paragraph

Body paragraph(s)

Closing lines

Sign-off and signature

You should think of a cover letter as a way to sell yourself to potential employers. That means expressing your qualifications, showing that you’ve been researching the company , and detailing why you would be perfect for the new job.

You never want to have just another generic cover letter, so here’s more on the specifics to craft your perfect cover letter :

Cover Letter Header

If you’re sending a physical copy of your cover letter, you should start with a professional header. Include the following information, formatted in the same way:

[Your name] [Your address] [Phone number] [Email] [Current date] [Hiring Manager name] [Title] [Company address]
Tom Timmins 34 Apple St., New York, NY (555)-555-5555 [email protected] 4/28/2021 Sara Bilson Director of Sales New Company 55 New Road, New York, NY

Cover Letter Greeting

Always do your best to find the name of the hiring manager . Check the job posting, the company’s website, and their LinkedIn page. If you strike out online, try calling the company and ask who the cover letter for your desired position should be sent to.

If you’re unable to find the hiring manager’s name, you can use “Dear Hiring Manager” or one of its better alternatives .

Dear Ms. Tanner, Dear Alix Sims, Dear Software Engineer Hiring Team,

Cover Letter Opening Lines

When writing a stellar cover letter, one of the “don’ts” is to open with a mundane sentence. Simply stating “I am reaching out to apply for [role] at [Company name]” will not set you apart from other job applicants or make a memorable first impression.

You want the opening line to be captivating while also remaining relevant to the position. Easy ways to do this are by sharing an experience that relates to the new job or expressing genuine enthusiasm for the role right away and why.

Remember, as a career changer, you want to highlight transferable skills and experiences. So, let’s say you’re trying to move from customer service to sales. A cover letter opening might look something like this:

Helping customers have positive experiences is a passion I’ve developed in over 4 years of customer service. With a proven track record of high customer engagement and retention, I’m ready to take my career to the next level by generating leads and sharing exciting opportunities with new and existing clients as a Sales Representative for XYZ Corp.

Cover Letter Body Paragraph(s)

In your cover letter’s body paragraph(s), you want to show recruiters that there is more than meets the eye when it comes to your skills.

There are your easily measurable hard skills , such as certifications, computer programs that you are proficient in, etc.

Then come your soft skills , which are character-based traits such as being detail-oriented, having superior time management skills, or being able to work in high-pressure environments. Speak to these soft skills that may not be as apparent within your resume and emphasize how they would be valuable in the new position.

A pro tip for choosing which transferable skills to focus on within your cover letter is to take a look at the job description. There you will find certain keywords that should definitely be featured within your letter.

ABC Inc. needs a Sales Representative who understands clients’ needs and can demonstrate unique value propositions to build trust and credibility. In my time as Customer Service Representative with XYZ Corp., I provided a high level of client service that earned me 99.7% positive customer reviews. I also worked closely with a team, mentoring and training new members to help achieve corporate goals and quotas. XYZ Corp. recognized my contributions by naming me “Customer Success Employee of the Month” in June 2020. I achieved this by maintaining spotless organizational skills to schedule calls, meetings, and client appointments most efficiently. When raised to a supervisory position, I quickly adapted to the demands of the new role by meeting with management to make sure our goals were aligned. This ensured that my team stayed on high-priority tasks, leading to a 17% reduction in customer wait time.

Notice how the candidate outlines her performance in previous jobs while focusing on transferable skills and experiences. Candidates that are already within the industry that you are applying for will likely have concrete examples of how they previously excelled in a similar role.

Even though you are just entering into this new career pathway , you still want to tell recruiters about your previous accomplishments.

If you increased sales, secured client acquisitions, received certain awards for reaching benchmarks, these are all concrete performance indicators. Being able to show how you excelled in other roles can translate to potential successes you may have within the new company. The job title might be different, but a win is a win.

Cover Letter Closing Lines

Your closing statement is as important as your opening lines, since it’s what the reader will walk away remembering most clearly.

A good way to end your cover letter is with a positive statement expressing your enthusiasm for the job and thanking the hiring manager for their time. A brief overview of your work background and a call to action are also appropriate to include.

Here’s an example of what this could look like:

I believe I’d be a great fit for this role and that my background in customer service would serve me well as a Sales Representative. I’d love to further discuss this opportunity with you and share how my experience could serve ABC Inc. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Cover Letter Sign-off and Signature

After you wrap up your letter, close with a professional “Sincerely,” followed by your signature. Here’s what this would look like for a hard copy letter:

Sincerely, [Your handwritten signature] [Your typed name]

And for an email or digital copy:

Sincerely, [Your typed name] [Your address] [Your phone number] [Your email address]

How to write a cover letter

Now that you have all the basics of writing cover letters, it is time to craft your own. Take a look at the professional cover letter examples below, but keep in mind that they should be altered to your liking. Every cover letter should be tailored to the actual position, so also make sure to change the template as needed for each and every potential employer.

[Your name] [Your address] [Phone number] [Email] [Current date] [Hiring Manager name] [Title] [Company address] Dear Mr. Smith, Over the course of the last few months, I have had the wonderful opportunity to begin organizing events within my community for those experiencing financial hardship during COVID. Being able to assist those in need has awakened a passion within me for being able to empower communities, which is why I found City of Lake County’s job requisition for Community Engagement Specialist very exciting. Although my previous experience is primarily within the sales industry, I believe that my professional experience still translates well into this new industry. While at Telco Sales Corp, I was able to achieve the following: Acquired 50 new partnerships in Q1 2020 Increased sales overall by 102% year-over-year Maintained a 98% customer retention rate As a Community Engagement Specialist, the goal is to cultivate relationships and secure funding for community programs. My sales background has proven that I am able to build and maintain relationships while driving revenue. I also won several awards during my tenure, including back-to-back Employee of the Year acknowledgment and Lead Customer Care Advocate. I am ready to make this career transition as I have found my calling when it comes to bettering my community. The analytical and customer service skills from my previous industry paired with my planning and management capabilities would make me the ideal Community Engagement Specialist with Lake County. I appreciate you taking the time to learn more about my qualifications and experiences, and I look forward to learning more about the opportunity. Sincerely, (Signature for hard copy letter) [Your name]

Email cover letters will be exactly the same as a standard career change cover letter. However, there are additional considerations to be made with the actual execution.

You will want to include your full name and the role you are applying for within the subject line. Some job postings will specifically state whether the cover letter should be sent as an email attachment or within the body of the email, so pay close attention to requisition details.

If there is no specification, you can simply put the salutation (skip the preceding contact information that is in a standard cover letter ) and paste your letter into the email. Here is a simple, email career change cover letter sample:

Subject line: Sports Content Writer — [Your name]
Dear [Hiring manager name], Nothing is better than being able to create content that readers love to consume. Last year, I launched my sports blog and quickly realized that what started out as a hobby was my true passion. That is why though I have been working as a Regulatory Specialist the last five years, the Sports Content Writer role at Sports Co. would offer the perfect career transition. With my website, I was able to average over 7,000 unique visitors a month without any paid search campaigns. I also launched a community of over 10,000 sports fans on Facebook where readers are able to engage and ask questions related to the industry. My YouTube channel also currently has over 2,000 subscribers and counting, with new videos produced on a weekly cadence. As a Regulatory Specialist, I had to review a large volume of applications on a daily basis and ensure accuracy. I also had to update applications and send out correspondence for any missing information. This has helped me become a skilled proofreader , meaning that my content is publication-ready and requires little time to edit. Additional achievements while in this role have included: Maintaining an 100% accuracy rate on approved applications Receiving multiple Processor of the Month awards for completing the most applications over a 30-day period Being named Quality Assurance Lead for consistently proofing and sending over 100+ pieces of correspondence within a 7-day period Sports Co. is a company built on providing fun and engaging sports information to fans. Being that your site averages 100,000 views per day and is considered an authority in the sports industry, I feel like my skill set would only help add to the overall readership. Unlike other companies, Sports Co. also caters to less popular sports such as darts and pool. I have experience writing about these sports and numerous others on my own blog, with a knowledge of just about every sport imaginable. I believe that being able to work in a fast-paced environment, familiarity producing high volumes of content, and having a wide breadth of sports knowledge make me an ideal candidate for the Sports Content Writer position. I appreciate your time in reviewing my qualifications and I look forward to learning more about the opportunity. Best, [Your name] [Address] [Phone number] [Email] [LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

Explain why you’re seeking a career change. This is a question that just about any applicant seeking a new career would likely receive in a job interview , so it’s great to disclose it in your cover letter.

Employers generally want to know why you left your last employer and making a complete career change naturally leaves questions. Your reason could be as wanting to try something new in a post-COVID job market . You may have a friend that is in the industry and you feel that your skill set more closely aligns with a role more similar to theirs.

There really is no right or wrong as far as your reasoning; just make sure to give the hiring manager an idea of why you want the position even though your experience is elsewhere.

Although I excel at customer service, I find that I’m most engaged and performing at my highest level when I’m helping a customer find a new solution rather than fix a problem with their current product. When my supervisor commented on how no customer service rep she had managed had higher conversion rates than me, it stuck with me.

Show passion for your new direction. This is where you can truly shine and completely differentiate yourself from other applicants. Why are you passionate about the industry, and more specifically, this particular role?

You want to explain why you are excited to be on this journey and how you would be an excellent fit for the team. Discuss where this passion comes from to add a personal touch, then explain why having this drive will help you succeed in the role.

Being able to help customers find quality solutions while maintaining brand loyalty is a real passion of mine. I hope to bring your company’s product and services to a wider audience because I truly believe that there’s no better POS service around than what you offer.

Prove you understand the company. Hiring managers want to hire people that have a genuine, vested interest in their organization. Do you have personal reasons as to why you want to join the company? Do they have a social impact team whose efforts and initiatives you admire?

Scrape beneath the surface and do research. Show the recruiter how your core values align with those of the company.

You can start with looking at the company’s website , but you should dig deeper by also visiting LinkedIn. Take a look at the different profiles of employees, paying close attention to those that might have a similar role to the one you are applying for. You can learn more about a company from the people that work there versus website boilerplate.

I notice that you have a corporate motto of “Listen First,” which really resonates with me. Sales, like customer service, is all about accurately identifying pain points and offering solutions that may not be apparent to the customer at first. I make it a point to allow clients free reign at the start of a discussion, so as to better inform my strategy for helping them.

How long should a career change cover letter be?

A career change cover letter should be about half a page or three and four paragraphs. Your letter should only be between 200 and 400 words so it’s important to be concise and to the point.

How do you state that you are changing a career in a cover letter?

You should explain to the reader why you are seeking a career change and show passion for your new direction when stating a career change in a cover letter.

A potential employer will want to know why you left your previous employer and they will wonder why you left the field completely. Explaining your reasons will help give them a better understanding.

What should be avoided when writing a cover letter?

You should avoid any spelling or grammar mistakes in your cover letter. It can be seen as unprofessional if you misspelled anything in your letter. You should also avoid making your letter generic because your recipient will be able to tell. Be sure to tailor it to each company that you are applying to and try to find the name of your recipient as well.

How To Write A Career Change Cover Letter

career change to human resources cover letter

Nicole Ozburn Human Resources Director

Some things are industry specific but can be quickly learned due to your similar experience in another industry. For instance, if I were looking to change my career from Human Resources to Marketing, I would talk about my recruitment skills and how I have marketed jobs in the past. I would also advise to describe the reason for the change in career. If it is due to COVID-19, the economy, or recently acquiring additional skills through education, the employer may be compelled to give my resume some consideration.

career change to human resources cover letter

Kevin Daniels Owner and Lead Copywriter

The idea of capturing the reader’s attention at the outset is an excellent one–that has proven to be effective.

You could even start with a quote from a known expert in the field of interest (or simply a famous person)–and use this as a jumping-off place for the content of your letter. Also, using a bulleted format for the body of the letter can be eye-catching (because it’s different)–and will provide structure for seamlessly popping tailored content in/out of your letter as needed.

Translatable skills are extremely important with transition cover letters (and resumes too). First, try Googling “Work Skills” and then “Work Traits.” You will get many, many examples of each (which will help you discern the difference)–and will help you choose ones that ring true for you; ones that are aligned with your professional brand.

Also, remember to avoid too much content (or any) content unique to the industry you’re leaving.

In my 14-year career with Boeing Commercial Airplanes, I became a noted expert in DfX and APQP methodologies…

In the recent decade-plus of my experience, I have achieved noteworthy SME status in Lean/Six Sigma and related compliance directives delivering millions of dollars of recurring savings to the business…

This uses the far more universal “Lean” and Six Sigma” references that will have meaning in any business or manufacturing environment, as opposed to pigeonholing yourself as Aerospace-centric.”

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Chris Kolmar is a co-founder of Zippia and the editor-in-chief of the Zippia career advice blog. He has hired over 50 people in his career, been hired five times, and wants to help you land your next job. His research has been featured on the New York Times, Thrillist, VOX, The Atlantic, and a host of local news. More recently, he's been quoted on USA Today, BusinessInsider, and CNBC.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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How To Write the Best Career Change Cover Letter (+ Examples) 

Charlotte Grainger

So, you want to try something completely new? When you’re thinking about a career change, your cover letter is an essential tool. Your resume will tell the hiring manager about your experience, but you’ll use the cover letter to fill in the blanks.

Frankly, when you're changing careers, you have to work just a bit harder than any other applicants with a more intuitive work history. That means showing that the experience you have is an asset and that it can be transferred to this new role. Luckily, you can do all of this (and more!) by writing a well-thought-out career change cover letter. 

A career change cover letter is an opportunity to start a conversation to explain exactly why you're applying for a job outside of your current field. Get this right, and you will convince any hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job. But how do you get started?

Here at ZipJob, we give you the resources you need to supercharge your job search. In the following guide, we’ll share seven tips from our professional resume writers on how to write the best career change cover letter. We've also got a career change cover letter example for you to check out.

More common than you might think

First, a word of encouragement: In our fast-paced and rapidly changing economy, people are changing careers at rates that would have been unthinkable just a few short generations ago. In fact, recent statistics show that people have an average of 12 jobs in their lifetime. 

That can create problems for many applicants, however, and you may not be sure how you can use your resume to properly convey the right experience needed for your new career. The good news is that you can take care of that concern by using that other vital application tool: the cover letter.

7 tips for your career change cover letter

Ready to put pen to paper? When you're writing a career change cover letter, it's important to stay on task. This isn't the place to write a heart-to-heart that reads more like a journal entry than a professional document. Instead, focus on what makes you a great applicant. 

To help you along the way, we have some expert-backed tips below:

1. Make sure you use the right words

Changing careers is a big deal. While your resume will have covered your skills and experience, you can use this letter to really sell yourself to the hiring manager. What you lack in experience, you may be able to make up for in the willingness to learn.

While you can use your cover letter to explain why you want a new career, it doesn’t start and end there. This is also an opportunity to share why you are ready to switch things up. With that in mind, use words that excite the hiring manager and show your desire to work in your chosen field. The more creative you are with the language you use, the better here.

2. Be honest about your career change

The biggest mistake you could make here is trying to sneak your way into a new sector. The hiring manager already has your resume, so they know that you don’t have experience in this field. You should never try to bamboozle them into interviewing you on the basis of faux experience. Even if you do make it to the interview level, you will soon get found out. 

Instead, you need to be 100% honest about your career change. Direct your cover letter to the hiring manager and be clear about why you are switching industries. For example, you may have reached the highest heights in your current sector and feel it’s time for a change. On the other hand, you may have a real passion for this new field and want to pursue it. 

Whatever your reason is, now is the time to talk about it. You don’t need to write a short memoir. The hiring manager will ask you more in-depth questions at the interview stage. However, it’s smart to outline your reasoning here so that you fill in the blanks. State that you are looking to move sectors and try to give a compelling reason to the reader now.

3. Emphasize your transferable skills

When you’re writing a career change cover letter, this is vital. Transferable skills are your current talents that would help you succeed in a different position. These skills are often soft skills but may also be technical or analytical skills from your previous profession. Identify what your strengths are. How might those help you in another industry?

You can also approach this from the other side by spending some time analyzing the company’s needs. Look at the job description, the company website, and recent media coverage to identify the core skills that this company requires. Once you’ve honed in on those needs, you can determine which of your skills can help to make you a great candidate for the job.

Of course, you should heavily feature your transferable skills on your resume. Once you've noted them, you can offer more of an explanation in your cover letter about how each skill will apply to this new job. 

Emphasize your relevant skills within the body of the career change cover letter too. That means including specific examples of how they have helped you to achieve certain results and goals in the past. Show the hiring manager what you have to bring to the table. You can do this by identifying the overlap between your two fields and highlighting it clearly. Be brief, but be sure to answer why you're applying and why you're worth interviewing.

Key Takeaway

The key to a career change cover letter is to identify and highlight related and transferable skills.

4. Focus on your results

Results matter more than you think. The number one thing that will push you ahead of your competition are fantastic accomplishments on your resume . Your accomplishments are still valid, even when changing careers: awards, honors, and other results that show you're a high-achieving employee will make you look like a winner. 

Your career change cover letter gives you a chance to explain why it's so impressive that you accomplished something. Try to figure out numbers or metrics – these really stand out on resumes and cover letters. Quantifying your results will show the hiring manager that your hard work achieves big things. This fact will surely grab their attention. 

To showcase those results, you need to emphasize the success that you’ve enjoyed in prior jobs, providing details that help to connect those successes to your transferable skills. From there, you only need to complete the picture by explaining how your prior achievements and transferable skills can offer tangible benefits to the new company.

Always use the STAR method

Showcasing your results and quantifying them doesn’t have to be hard. Make your statements stand out by using the STAR method throughout your cover letter. 

5. Demonstrate genuine passion

Let your passion for the company be on full display so that the hiring manager knows you care about getting the position. Mention something new or interesting the company has accomplished, or relate to the company's core values. You can add your personality to your cover letter – as long as it stays relevant!

Take the time to do your homework so that you have a firm understanding of what the company does and how it hopes to achieve its goal. It’s also worth trying to understand the company culture ahead of time. That will enable you to properly convey your passion for the position in the body of your cover letter. In short, figure out what the vibe is and match it.

6. Tailor your resume to reflect your career change goals

If this is your first time creating a career change cover letter, be sure to review your resume when you’re done so that everything is properly coordinated. It all needs to match up. You don’t want any inconsistencies between those two important documents: your cover letter should only talk about experiences that are also mentioned on your resume.

To keep your message clear, make any resume changes that are needed to keep it aligned with the message on your cover letter. Remember, it’s the little things that often make the difference between success and failure. 

If your resume isn't tailored for your career transition goals, check out this article next: How To Tailor Your Resume For Different Positions

7. End with a strong conclusion 

When you’ve done all of the above, it’s time to sign off. The end of your cover letter is a good chance to reaffirm why you want to take this step. You may also want to add that you will help the business in question meet its goals. One of the more critical things you can do with your career change cover letter is insert some type of call to action – encouraging the reader to reach out to you. 

Remember, the hiring manager will naturally slow their reading pace down as they reach the bottom of the page. For that reason, it is vital that you end on a strong and clear note.

Career change cover letter example

Changing Careers Cover Letter Example

This example is to the point and easy to scan through. It has several examples of how the applicant has added value in the past, using numbers that are easy for the reader to translate to a different industry.

Notice also that this letter – like all good cover letters – includes a professional heading and uses a business letter format. It is highly specific, a quick but clear message that you've put some thought into tailoring your cover letter. 

The letter does not use a generic "to whom it may concern" greeting; ideally, you can find the name of the hiring manager. When in doubt, addressing your letter to a "hiring team" is a good alternative.

The heading with your own information was borrowed from the updated resume format we used to share 200+ resume examples written by our professional resume writers. Using the same format for your resume and cover letter is another instance of details that stand out.

Focus on value; win the day 

As you can see, the cover letter for a career change is similar to many others. You still want to focus on the value you can add to the company. By emphasizing your transferable skills, focusing on past achievements, and demonstrating your interest in the new company, you should be able to leverage your existing skill set in a way that sets you apart from the crowd.

Ready to take the leap and start that new career? Use the ZipJob free resume review now to get the insights that you need to perfect your next application and get ahead of the competition. 

Recommended reading: 

9 Cover Letter Mistakes That Cost You Interviews - ZipJob

7 Signs It's Time To Quit Your Job

How to Ask for a Job Referral + 5 Examples

Charlotte Grainger, Editor & Content Writer, Charlotte Grainger, Editor & Content Writer

Charlotte Grainger is a freelance writer living and working in Sheffield, UK. She has a passion for career development and loves sharing tips and advice. Follow her on Twitter

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Human Resources Cover Letter Example & Guide for 2024

Background Image

Human resources representatives are the unsung heroes of every company, juggling roles, understanding the ins and outs of workplace dynamics, and ensuring everyone else fits in just right. 

It's like you have this secret superpower to match the right talent with the right role. 

But when it comes to writing a cover letter for yourself, you suddenly get stuck.

We don't blame you. Showcasing your HR prowess in just a few paragraphs isn't a walk in the park. 

After all, how do you condense all those years of people management, conflict resolution, and organizational development into one page?

We’re here to give you the answer. Here’s what we’ll cover: 

  • A Stellar Human Resources Cover Letter Example

5 Steps for the Perfect Human Resources Cover Letter

  • 3 Essential Human Resources Cover Letter Tips

Let’s dive in!

Human Resources Cover Letter Example

Human Resources Cover Letter Example

You know just what an outstanding human resources cover letter looks like. 

Now, just follow these steps to write your own :

#1. Put Contact Information in the Header

Kick off your human resources cover letter with your contact details. Pop them in the cover letter's header, just like you would on your resume .

Here's the rundown:

  • Full Name. Write down your complete name right at the top left corner of your cover letter.
  • Professional Title. List the exact HR role you're eyeing. Remember, the HR head might be juggling applications for varied roles. Be crystal clear to make their job easier.
  • Email Address. Go for an email that's both easy to read and professional, like a blend of your first and last name. Leave your teenage email out of this. For instance, [email protected] is a no-go, but [email protected] is spot on.
  • Phone Number. Make sure the number you add is correct, and if you're reaching out internationally, include the dialing code in there too
  • Location. Just your city and state, or country, will do. If you're eyeing a remote role or planning a move, give them a heads up in both your resume and cover letter.
  • Relevant Links (optional). Feel free to drop links to useful websites or social media, like your LinkedIn profile .

Got your details down? Sweet!

Time to add the contact information of the hiring manager who’ll be evaluating you.

Here’s the scoop:

  • Company Name. Jot down the name of the company you've got your sights on.
  • HR Head’s Name. If you can, find out who's heading the HR department. Look at the job ad, their website, or their LinkedIn page.
  • Location. Specify the city, state, and country, especially if they’re global giants. If they have more than one office in your city, you can also add their street name and number.
  • Email Address (optional). If you can dig it up, drop it in the HR head's email.
  • Date of Writing (optional). Slide in the date you penned down your cover letter. It's all about the finer details!

#2. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve listed all your contact details, make sure your cover letter speaks directly to its reader.

That means skipping the old-school ‘To whom it may concern.’ It's a bit last century.

The right greeting, on the other hand, can make your letter stand out in the right way.

First up, play detective. Dive into the job posting, company website, or LinkedIn page to see if you can find the HR manager's details.

Once you find what you’re looking for, greet them accordingly . Going with "Ms." or "Mr." followed by their surname is a safe bet. But if you're in the dark about their gender or marital status, simply use their full name. Here’s what that looks like:

  • Dear Mr. De Vries,
  • Dear Loren De Vries,

Hit a dead end in your detective work? No worries. 

You can address your letter to the broader HR team or the company:

  • Dear Human Resources Team,
  • Dear Recruitment Team,
  • Dear Talent Acquisition Department,
  • Dear Head of Human Resources,

#3. Write an Eye-Catching Opening Statement

Hiring managers often scan a candidate's application swiftly, sometimes only taking about seven seconds to decide whether it’s worth their attention.

So your human resources cover letter needs to make an impact from the start.

Begin by expressing your interest in the position. Demonstrating your genuine enthusiasm for the HR field or a particular role can pique a hiring manager's interest, making them eager to learn more about you.

Taking the time to research the company can make all the difference here. The deeper your understanding of the organization's culture and objectives, the better you can position yourself as an excellent fit. 

This shows your genuine interest in the job and that you're not just applying left and right in hopes of any job. If you have any notable accomplishments or specific skills tailored to the HR role, leading with that can give you an advantage. 

However, it's essential to keep your cover letter’s introduction short. The objective here is to intrigue the hiring manager enough to make them want to read your entire cover letter, so you shouldn’t give them all the details from the start.

#4. Use the Cover Letter Body for the Details

The body of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what makes you the perfect fit for the role.

But don’t just repeat the contents of your human resources resume . This segment of your cover letter is the spotlight moment to elaborate on your HR expertise and the unique skills that you bring to the table. Your goal is to persuade the hiring manager that you’re the most fitting candidate out of the entire pool.

Highlighting your relevant achievements in the world of HR and drawing parallels with the job ad can be a game-changer. For example, if the role requires expertise in talent acquisition, employee engagement, or organizational development, highlight your experiences and skills in these specific areas instead of using a broad-brush approach.

You can also use your human resources cover letter to explain how the company's ethos, organizational structure, and HR challenges align with your professional journey. If you have insights into the company's HR practices, recent initiatives, or the technology stack they use, show them. Your research skills will leave a good impression and do a great job of convincing them you’re right for the job.

#5. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Always end your cover letter with finesse and professionalism to leave on a high note. After all, you want to leave the hiring manager with a lasting impression that’ll make them want to call you for an interview.

In your conclusion, confidently revisit the reasons you're an ideal fit for the human resources position in their company. Reiterate the unique skills or experiences you bring that set you apart from other candidates, and keep a positive attitude throughout.

Then, wrap up with a call to action. By suggesting the hiring manager take the next step, like having a more in-depth conversation about your application, you're increasing your odds of them actually doing it.

Finally, sign off on your human resources cover letter. Pick a respectful closing line and follow it with your full name. Here’s an example:

I'm eager to further discuss how my expertise in human resources aligns with your organization’s goals. Please feel free to reach out to me via the given contact details so that we have the chance to arrange an interview.

If "Warmly" feels a tad too common for your liking, you might consider these alternatives:

  • Yours truly,
  • Best regards,
  • With respect,
  • Thank you for your time,

Human Resources Cover Letter Structure

 Essential Human Resources Cover Letter Tips

You've mastered the basics of cover letters! Now, let's fine-tune yours with some key cover letter tips tailored for HR specialists. 

#1. Match Your Resume

When applying for a role in human resources, presentation matters!

If you want to showcase your attention to detail and organizational skills , your cover letter's design and format must align with your resume.

Make sure your text and contact details are neatly arranged, and maintain a consistent font style and size. Also, be mindful of the page margins and line spacing, all while aiming to keep your cover letter within one page .

Or Use A Cover Letter Template Instead

Matching your application got you stressed? 

Try our resume builder and cover letter templates ! 

Designed with hiring managers from around the globe, they blend a sleek, professional look with industry requirements. Grab one, match your resume, and boom—you're all set!

Human Resources Cover Letter Examples

#2. Be Enthusiastic 

Hiring managers appreciate applicants who display a genuine passion for the HR industry, so an enthusiastic tone can set your cover letter apart

That said, while it's great to show admiration for the company you're applying to, remember to keep it balanced. There’s no need to lay on the compliments too thick. What you should aim for is a reflection of your confidence and genuine excitement about the role.

Just remember to stay grounded and don’t sound too confident, or else you might come off as arrogant. Convey your genuine enthusiasm that you’re the right person for this specific HR job, not that you’re the greatest candidate they’ll ever get.

#3. Be Formal

While it's tempting to give your cover letter a casual flair, keep in mind that professionalism is highly valued by hiring managers. There’s nothing wrong with being friendly, but foregoing formality is a huge mistake .

By adopting a formal tone, you’re showing the employer that you’re a serious candidate and that you’re taking the role seriously, too. Even in companies with a casual work culture, this can convey that you respect their ethos and that you’re ready to fit into their environment. 

Just remember, "formal" doesn't mean robotic. Your personality can still shine through, just in a more polished and polite manner.

Key Takeaways

And that’s all there is to human resource cover letters! Hopefully, you’re ready to land that dream HR job in no time.

But before you submit your cover letter, here are some main points from our article:

  • Begin your human resources cover letter by detailing both your contact information and that of the HR manager. Your details must be accurate so the HR manager can contact you for a potential interview.
  • The introductory paragraph of your HR specialist cover letter should grab the attention of the hiring manager and encourage them to read further.
  • In the main section of your cover letter, delve into your most significant achievements and skills that align with the human resources role you're after.
  • It's a good strategy to use a compelling call to action towards the end of your human resources cover letter, nudging the hiring manager to possibly call you or set up an interview.
  • Keep your cover letter’s design consistent with your resume. If you're pressed for time, consider using a set of our resume and cover letter templates for a harmonized look.

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More From Forbes

Writing Cover Letters For A Career Change: Tips And Examples

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Embarking on a career change is a pivotal moment, fraught with uncertainty but brimming with potential. And especially in cases where your resume might not directly align with the job at hand, your cover letter becomes the narrative that connects the dots. A well-crafted cover can illuminate your strengths, align your past experiences with your future aspirations, and persuade potential employers to see the value you bring.

The Importance Of A Cover Letter In Career Changes

In career transitions, your cover letter is your storyteller. It explains the why and the how of your career change, showcasing your enthusiasm and demonstrating how your background equips you with unique perspectives and transferable skills. It addresses potential concerns about your career shift head-on, presenting your transition as an asset rather than a liability.

Tips For Writing A Career Change Cover Letter

1. Personalize Your Approach : Address the letter to a specific person whenever possible. Doing so demonstrates attention to detail and a genuine interest in the position. You want to show that you’re not conducting a generic job search, but that you’ve done your research. You’ve perused (not skimmed) the company website and you read that 20-page yearly report from the CEO. You’ve even read their blog and can quote freely from it. You’ve educated yourself.

2. Emphasize Transferable Skills : Highlight the skills and experiences from your previous roles that are relevant to the new position. Be specific and quantify achievements where possible.

3. Show Enthusiasm and Commitment : Employers want to know that you are genuinely interested in the new field. Express your passion for the career change and your eagerness to contribute.

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4. Tailor Your Narrative : Connect your past experiences to the job you're applying for, demonstrating how your unique background can bring a fresh perspective to the role.

5. Address Potential Concerns : Be upfront about your career change, framing it as a positive decision guided by clear motivation and a strong understanding of the new field.

6. End with a Strong Call to Action : Conclude by expressing your desire to discuss your application further in an interview, showing proactivity and determination.

7. Use Strategic Language : Avoid clichéd adjectives. Opt for vivid, specific language that paints a clear picture of your capabilities and achievements.

Example: General Career Change Cover Letter

Dear [Hiring Manager's Name],

I am excited to apply for the [Position] at [Company], transitioning from a career in [Current Industry] to [New Industry]. My experience in [Current Industry] has equipped me with valuable skills that I am eager to apply in [New Industry]. For instance, while working as [Previous Position], I developed a keen ability to [transferable skill], resulting in [specific achievement].

In [Current Industry], I honed my skills in [relevant skill] and demonstrated my ability to [relevant achievement], directly benefiting my team by [specific outcome]. I am particularly drawn to [New Industry] because [reason for interest], and I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to bring my [specific skill] and [another skill] to the [Position] at [Company].

[Your Name]

Tweaks For Various Career Stages

Whether you are making a change early in your career or transitioning later, your cover letter should reflect your rationale and excitement for this new path.

Example: Early Career Cover Letter

As someone at the early stages of my career, I am eager to leverage the foundational skills I gained in [Initial Field], such as [specific skill], in [New Field]. My recent role as [Previous Position] allowed me to develop [relevant skills or experiences], which align closely with the requirements of the [Position] at [Company].

Example: Late Career Cover Letter

Transitioning into [New Field] at this point in my career is a deliberate and enthusiastic choice, driven by my deep-seated interest in [aspect of New Field]. With extensive experience in [Previous Field], I bring a wealth of knowledge and a unique perspective that can contribute to innovative solutions and strategies at [Company].

Tweaks For White And Blue-Collar Roles

Transitioning between white and blue-collar roles offers a unique opportunity to highlight diverse skills and experiences.

Example: White To Blue Collar Cover Letter

I am eager to apply the strategic and managerial skills honed in my white-collar career to the hands-on, dynamic environment of [Blue Collar Field]. My experience in [White Collar Role], where I developed [specific skills], aligns well with the challenges and responsibilities of the [Blue Collar Position] at [Company].

Example: Blue To White Collar Cover Letter

Transitioning from [Blue Collar Field] to [White Collar Field], I bring practical, on-the-ground experience that can inform and enhance the strategic decisions in [White Collar Role]. My background in [Blue Collar Role], where I mastered [specific skills], equips me with a unique perspective beneficial for the [White Collar Position] at [Company].

Including A Career Change Statement On Your Resume/CV

While your cover letter is the ideal place to elaborate on your career change, your resume/CV should also reflect this transition. A brief career change statement, positioned at the beginning of your resume, can effectively set the context for your career narrative. This statement should succinctly convey your transition, emphasizing your commitment to the new field and highlighting any transferable skills or relevant experiences.

How To Craft A Career Change Statement For Your Resume

1. Objective Statement : Begin with a clear, concise objective that outlines your career goals and demonstrates your enthusiasm for your new field.

2. Summary of Qualifications : Follow your objective with a brief summary of your most relevant qualifications, focusing on skills and experiences that transition well into your new career.

3. Highlight Transferable Skills : Clearly identify and emphasize any skills from your previous career that are pertinent to your new path. This not only demonstrates your capability but also shows your proactive approach in aligning your skill set with the new role's requirements.

4. Tailor Your Experience : Adjust the descriptions of your past positions to highlight the responsibilities and achievements most relevant to your desired career path. Use quantifiable achievements to underscore your adaptability and impact.

5. Education and Training : If you have pursued any education or training relevant to your new field, highlight this prominently on your resume to illustrate your dedication and commitment to your career change.

Make Your Language Unique

To avoid sounding like everyone else, remember to use distinctive and precise adjectives in your cover letter and resume. For instance:

  • Instead of "experienced," try "seasoned" or "accomplished," providing specific examples that demonstrate this experience, like spearheading a successful project or leading a team to exceed its targets.
  • Replace "passionate" with "enthused" or "committed," detailing a project or initiative you pursued with zeal, which can resonate more authentically with hiring managers.
  • Substitute "results-driven" with "outcome-focused," illustrating this with a particular scenario where your focus on results led to tangible success for your organization.

Your cover letter and resume are your advocates, narrating your professional journey and articulating why you are not just seeking a new job, but embarking on a new career with purpose and passion. By carefully crafting these documents to reflect your individual story, you position yourself as a memorable and compelling candidate, someone who stands out from the crowd.

Mark Murphy

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5 Human Resources (HR) Cover Letter Examples for 2024

Stephen Greet

  • HR Cover Letter
  • HR Assistant
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As an HR professional, you know how to make employees and the corporation productive, especially when you bring in new talent. But even though you know the ins and outs of the hiring process, getting hired yourself is a different ballgame. 

It’s tiring enough having to assess hundreds of candidates’  job skills  all day only to head home and polish off an  HR resume , create a cover letter , and prepare another application for yours truly. 

We understand that getting hired isn’t easy—even if you’re familiar with the process. Our guide, complete with five HR cover letter examples, will walk you through how to write a cover letter that will land you an interview and, hopefully, your dream job.

career change to human resources cover letter

Human Resources Cover Letter Example 

USE THIS TEMPLATE

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Block Format

Human resources cover letter template

Why this cover letter works

  • Find a way to link the company to you. Derek does this by demonstrating values both he and the employer share, like his belief that employee relationships are at the heart of HR.
  • You can tell a short story, laugh at the witty  HR job ad , explain how you found the company, or state your enthusiasm for the high-impact position. 

Level up your cover letter game

Relax! We’ll do the heavy lifiting to write your cover letter in seconds.

Human Resources Assistant Cover Letter Example

Human resources assistant cover letter template

  • As far as the body is concerned, make it digestible and easy to read especially where you express your main skills and accomplishments as it helps you to convey your skills in an impactful manner.

Human Resources Generalist Cover Letter Example

Human resources generalist cover letter template

  • Another addition to creating an unforgettable piece is signing off with an optimistic attitude and exemplifying how your skills can contribute to the company’s ethos and objectives.

Human Resources Manager Cover Letter Example

Human resources manager cover letter template

  • Don’t be afraid to use a narrative style in your cover letters when it’s applicable, especially if you’ve had a good experience with the company.
  • Aidan starts his cover letter with a story about how he visited PLANTA and later states how he’s looking forward to “enjoying some amazing vegan meals.”
  • Remember what you’ve written in your body paragraphs when writing your conclusion and support your points. Don’t overthink it.

Human Resources Director Cover Letter Example

Human resources director cover letter template

  • In your cover letter, address what the company offers, such as amazing software or a killer hotel experience, and express your wish to experience more of what makes them unique.
  • If you decide to implement this technique, pay attention to tone and word choice. You never want to make it sound as if the company was poorly managing its employees, even if that was the case. 
  • For example, Julian explains Cedar Garland’s need for updated procedures for experienced employees and how The National Hotel needed modernized programs for payroll. 

Build your human resources resume for a complete application

Before we dive into the specific ways you can write your cover letter, don’t let  writing your resume  slip through the cracks. We make it simple with  professional resume templates  just like this one.

Human Resources Resume

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Write a Winning Human Resources Cover Letter

Rocket taking off from a laptop on a desk depicting writing a winning human resources cover letter

Writing a stunning human resources cover letter is difficult, so let’s break it down into three simple factors: research, details, and presentation.

career change to human resources cover letter

Step 1: Research the organization and its needs

As an HR professional, you know that reading generic cover letters is exhausting and annoying. They fail to show initiative or explain how the candidate will help you once they get hired. 

So, in your cover letter, show you care about the company and can help them reach its goals.  But you’ll only know what to write once you know what the business wants.

Start by reading the  human resources job description  to get a feel for their personality. Then scan their website to find their mission statement, vision, and goals. 

Assure the employer that you can deliver the results they desire by addressing their unique concerns and applying your relevant qualifications.

career change to human resources cover letter

Step 2: Share the details about one or two accomplishments

As you know, reading redundant paperwork is a complete snooze-fest. So, your human resources cover letter can’t be a repeat of your resume, or the recruiter will be snoring before they hit the second paragraph.

Think of your cover letter as a presentation. Pick one to two of your accomplishments that echo the job description’s requirements and give the full scope of those experiences. You could:

This example stays focused on one goal or talent (photography/videography). Although the candidate could have just focused on responsibilities, they focus instead on  how  their efforts helped the company.

  • Address your work and successes in revamping the onboarding process for seasonal hires
  • Share how you listened to employees and made lasting changes via surveys, check-ins, evaluations, etc. 
  • Talk about how you decreased the employee turnover rate

career change to human resources cover letter

Step 3: Convey the right tone and a clear message

Your cover letter should strike a balance between unique and professional, personal but not sentimental. Easier said than done, right?

Start by limiting your cover letter to one page .  Then you can start modifying your message. Present a logical argument with enough ethos (credibility) and pathos (emotion) to sell anyone on your skills. 

Then adjust your tone. Your cover letter can be funny, heartfelt, or candid—but moderation is key. Let the job description help you choose your content, your words, and how you phrase your message. Most of all, shoot for a tone that matches the company. 

Present a logical argument with enough ethos (credibility) and pathos (emotion) to sell anyone on your skills. 

Don’t despair if this is difficult; next up is revision, where you can fix any errors and tweak the content. Now is also a perfect time to let someone else read your cover letter to recommend improvements. 

Outlining Your Human Resources Cover Letter for Success

Two people helping each other on outlining a human resources cover letter

Starting any project with a blank slate is intimidating, so use this HR cover letter outline to get you started on the right foot!

career change to human resources cover letter

How to start a human resources cover letter

Your contact info:  Give employers a helping hand and provide your contact information right from the get-go. List your name, number, email, and physical address right at the top of your cover letter template. 

  • Formatting : If you’re using a block format, only include your physical address, and save your name for the signature.

Date:  Even in a virtual letter, you should include a date. It makes your cover letter look more professional, and it gives the hiring manager a timeline for your application.

Just make sure the date on your cover letter reflects the day you submit it, especially if you re-work your cover letters based on previous submissions.

  • Formatting : Write out the full date, e.g., January 5, 2023.

Inside address:  Your address isn’t the only one that matters; also include the inside address, aka the employer’s address. It should have the hiring manager or recruiter’s name, their title, and the company’s physical address. This shows the employer you’ve researched their company and know to whom you’re speaking. 

If the company doesn’t list its address or has multiple locations, check sites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and the company’s website (you can also check Google Maps).

Min Ju Ha, Director of Talent Acquisition 50 Eggs Hospitality Group 7350 Biscayne Blvd  Miami, FL 33138

  • Formatting : Each part of the address should be on a new line. Double space between the inside address and greeting. 

Greeting:  A polite greeting is always in vogue, so start your human resources cover letter with a formal, yet personal, salutation. Use the tried-and-true “dear,” followed by “Ms.” or “Mr.” and the hiring manager’s last name to avoid ruffling feathers (some businesses don’t appreciate casual introductions).

Finding the person in charge of hiring can be a pain, but people love to be addressed by name, so it’s worth it to spend the time to make a great first impression. Worst case scenario, address either the whole HR team (“Dear HR Hiring Team”) or the department head (“Dear HR Manager”). 

  • Formatting : After your greeting, you’ll need either a comma or a colon; a colon is the preferred business option, but if the business is more casual, you can get away with a comma. Let the job description guide you.

career change to human resources cover letter

How to write your human resources cover letter

Body:  This is the hardest part to get right, but we have you covered. First, focus on cutting your letter down to three to four short paragraphs.

Within those paragraphs, express your enthusiasm for the job, your qualifications, and your desire for future discussion. 

Opening paragraph:  Remember the last time you read a book that started like, “I am writing to inform you of my purpose, which is to write a really good book?” Yeah, us neither. Yet, most people begin their cover letters with similar statements that are polite but boing, like this: 

I read your job post on LinkedIn, and I am eager to apply. This human resources director position sounds like a perfect fit for my experience, and I know I can help your department reach its goals. My years of experience in human resources and management makes me an ideal candidate.

This information might not be  wrong , but it’s vague and generalized—and like 95% of other cover letters in the stack of applications. A good opening is unique and exciting while still being formal. It should address the company and express personality immediately, like this opener: 

Central New Mexico Community College’s core values of connection, compassion, and inspiration resonate with my values as a human resources professional. Your unique value-based approach has unsurprisingly made CNM one of the top 5 community colleges in the U.S. That, combined with your defined vision plans, inspired me to apply because my work would make a concrete difference for students and staff.

From the start, this candidate explains what they appreciate about the company and how they align with its beliefs and goals. 

Paragraphs 2-3:  These paragraphs should provide evidence for your qualifications and dig deep into your achievements; it’s time to define your part of the project and how you turned it into a success. 

However tempting, don’t try to tackle a job’s worth of success. Your letter will just sound cluttered and unfocused. Instead, focus on one accomplishment at a time, and provide plenty of details about that experience. 

I also have experience solving complex employee relations issues. As the HR manager with Cygna Labs, positive mediation was roughly 50% of my role. I investigated complaints, ensured compliance with legal employment requirements, and developed new policies and procedures. By the end of my position, our retention rate had increased by 45%, our human capital return on investment had improved by 23%, and the number of promoter-level NPS scores had increased by 42%.

Although 50% of their role focused on other tasks, this candidate only mentioned mediation/resolution and their successes with such.

Closing paragraph:  Don’t quit while you’re ahead—finish strong with a closing paragraph that summarizes your values, qualifications, and eagerness for an interview. This can sound like a lot, but rest assured, it can be done.

Start with a sentence summary of what you value based on the work experience you’ve described and how that adheres to the company’s values. Next, describe what you hope to accomplish in the position. Lastly, thank the employer and reassure them of your willingness to talk further. 

Just remember: you are an ideal candidate, but you shouldn’t sound like this:

As you can see, I have done everything you require (and more) at my previous jobs, which makes me the perfect candidate for this position. I know I can handle all employee relations responsibilities and ensure complete compliance as I have done at every HR job so far. Please give me a call or email at your earliest convenience; I look forward to making your day at my interview. 

Even if all this was true, it’s self-centered and doesn’t address the company at all. Instead, remind the employer of what they stand to gain when they hire you. Further establish how your goals align with theirs and what you’ll do for their HR department. 

I strive to improve the lives of employees by implementing modern practices and offering practical solutions to common problems. As your HR director, I desire to develop new training programs, ensure compliance, and increase employee engagement/satisfaction. Thank you for considering me for this position, and I hope to experience your restaurants first-hand soon.

This candidate explains their competency and their goals without sounding brash. It’s a delicate balance, but we know you can find it!

  • Formatting : Single space in your letter but double space between paragraphs. 

Signature:  All that’s left is to sign off and say “thank you” if you didn’t in the closing paragraph. Use a professional closer along with your name. 

Derek Annais

  • Formatting : If you’re presenting any hard copies of your human resources cover letter, quadruple space at the bottom to leave room to sign your name. 

Enclosure(s):  Many people don’t know about this section, but it’s important. It lists the other documents you’re submitting, reminding employers there’s more to come. It also helps them keep track of what you’ve included. 

HR positions usually require a job application and a resume, but some also require a supplemental questionnaire or references. Carefully scan the job description and application to make sure you provide everything requested.

Enclosures: Resume Application

  • Formatting : Use the singular or plural form of “enclosure” depending on how many documents you’re enclosing. Most of the time, it will be plural, but you should check it every time.

Is Your HR Resume on Par with Your Cover Letter?

Woman comparing on blackboard to see if human resources resume is on par with her cover letter.

Now that you’ve written your human resources cover letter, you’ll likely want to hit “submit” immediately. But don’t forget you still need to  outline your resume  and polish it to shine.  

You have a great persuasive argument, aka your cover letter, but you still need a document that quantifies your work experience, aka your resume. When combined, they paint a glowing picture of your career.

Want to know how to make your HR resume just as impressive as your cover letter? A look at our  resume examples  will give you the boost you need, and you can even edit this HR resume directly. 

Human Resources Director Resume

Need a resume to pair with your human resources director cover letter?

Human Resources Director Resume Template

If you’ve already started, try out our  resume checker  to get AI-powered advice to make your resume the best it can be. 

Now go snag the dream job you’ve always wanted!

Usually, you would address cover letters to the HR hiring manager, but that role may be vacant if you’re applying for it! Other times, the information may simply not be in the job description. Try searching LinkedIn or the company website for the name of an HR manager or higher-up company leader. If you can’t find any information, you can just lead off by saving “Dear [Company Name] hiring staff” or something similar.

HR is a bit more formal than other positions, with greater needs for cultural awareness and professional communication. However, with cultural awareness in mind, you ideally want to match your tone to the HR job description to show how you’ll fit in with the company’s culture. For example, if the tone comes across as innovative and creative, you could use a similar style when describing your HR abilities. Plus, you may want to emphasize innovative HR practices, like managing employee needs through workplace flexibility.

One page is the ideal length for HR cover letters. You may have been involved in hiring processes before and understand how fast-paced these decisions can be. Keeping your cover letter concise is essential to help hiring managers identify your top skills in aspects like employee relations and advising. That way, they can easily connect the dots that you’re the right pick for the role.

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Examples

Career Change Cover Letter

career change to human resources cover letter

Shifting careers? Make your transition smooth with our guide on writing Career Change Cover Letters . This comprehensive guide presents practical examples and expert writing tips to help you demonstrate your transferable skills and convince employers of your potential in a new field. Crafting a compelling career change cover letter can be your stepping stone to exciting new opportunities. Let’s explore the benefits of a well-written career change cover letter and how it can set you apart from other applicants.

What is a Career Change Cover Letter? Definition

A Career Change Cover Letter is a specialized type of cover letter written by job seekers who are switching to a new industry or job role different from their previous experience. This document aims to highlight the transferable skills and knowledge the applicant possesses that make them a suitable candidate for the new role, despite not having direct experience in the field. It provides an opportunity for the applicant to explain their motivation for the career change and reassure employers of their potential and commitment to the new career path.

What is the Best Example of Career Change Cover Letter?

[Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State, ZIP] [Your Email Address] [Today’s Date]

[Employer’s Name] [Company Name] [Company Address] [City, State, ZIP]

Dear [Employer’s Name],

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name], as advertised on [where you found the job posting]. Although I have spent the majority of my career in [Current/Previous Industry], I am eager to transition into [New Industry] and I believe that my strong [mention specific skills] make me a promising candidate for this role.

In my current/previous role as a [Your Current/Previous Job Title] at [Your Current/Previous Company], I have [describe an achievement or responsibility that demonstrates relevant skills]. I believe this experience has prepared me well for the [Job Title] role at your company by demonstrating my ability to [mention a job requirement for the new role].

What attracts me to [New Industry] and specifically to your company is [explain your motivation for the career change and why you are interested in this company]. I am confident that my passion for [aspects of the new job] combined with my transferable skills make me a strong candidate for this role.

I would be thrilled to further discuss how my background and skills would allow me to contribute to your team. I am eager to bring my commitment and drive to succeed to this new opportunity. Thank you for considering my application.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Remember to tailor this template to the specific job and company you’re applying to, and be sure to highlight transferable skills and explain your interest in the new industry.

Career Change Cover Letter

Size: 27 KB

Free Career Change Cover Letters – Copy & Paste

Explore our selection of good career change cover letters that you can copy, paste, and customize to fit your needs. These examples are designed to highlight your transferable skills, showcase your enthusiasm for the new industry, and convince potential employers of your suitability, making your career transition a smoother process. Use these as a springboard to create your own compelling career change cover letters.

1. Career Change Cover Letter No Experience

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. Although I have been working in [Current Industry], I am eager to transition to [Target Industry] and believe that my transferrable skills and eagerness to learn will make me an asset to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I have [mention a significant accomplishment or responsibility]. While these skills might not directly relate to [mention a responsibility of the target job], they demonstrate my ability to [mention a quality or trait required for the target job].

I am confident that my experience in [mention a transferrable skill or area of knowledge] and my passion for [mention an aspect of the target industry] make me a strong candidate for this position. I am excited to bring my unique perspective to the [Job Title] role at [Company Name], and look forward to the possibility of discussing my application further.

How to Use: This  no experience cover letter is perfect for individuals who are looking to switch industries but have no experience in their target field. It emphasizes transferrable skills and motivation to learn, which are crucial when changing careers.

Career Change Cover Letter No Experience

Size: 26 KB

2. Career Change Cover Letter for Human Resources

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. Having spent [Number of Years] in the [Current Industry], I am now keen to utilize my people management skills in a human resources capacity.

During my tenure as a [Your Current Job Title], I was frequently praised for my ability to handle complex situations with professionalism and a level-headed approach. I believe this skill, among others, makes me an ideal candidate for the position at your organization.

Your company’s reputation for [Company’s Best Feature] has always interested me, and I am confident that my experience in people management and my ability to [a specific HR related skill] can be an asset to your team.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing my suitability for the position further.

How to Use: This hr cover letter is designed for professionals shifting into human resources. Highlight your people management skills, problem-solving capabilities, and willingness to learn new HR systems.

Career Change Cover Letter for Human Resources

3. Career Change Cover Letter for Teachers

I am thrilled to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. While my professional experience lies in [Current Industry], my passion for education and mentoring has driven me to pursue a career in teaching.

In my previous role as [Your Current Job Title], I consistently [mention a significant achievement or responsibility that demonstrates a key teaching skill—e.g. communication, empathy, creativity]. This experience, coupled with my desire to inspire young minds, makes me confident that I would bring a unique and valuable perspective to your team.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to have the opportunity to contribute to [Company Name], and I am ready to further discuss my qualifications in an interview.

How to Use: This teacher cover letter is ideal for professionals transitioning into teaching. Emphasize skills relevant to teaching such as communication, creativity, and patience, and express your passion for education.

Career Change Cover Letter for Teachers

Size: 24 KB

4. Career Change Cover Letter for Administrative Assistant

I am eager to apply for the Administrative Assistant position at [Company Name]. Despite having spent most of my career in [Current Industry], I have always admired the organizational skills and multitasking abilities that Administrative Assistants exhibit.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I have [describe an achievement or responsibility that demonstrates organizational skills or multitasking]. I am confident that these skills, along with my ability to work in a fast-paced environment, make me a strong candidate for this role.

I am thrilled about the opportunity to bring my unique skills to [Company Name] and support the team in any way I can.

Thank you for considering my application.

How to Use: This administrative assistant cover letter is for professionals transitioning into an administrative role. Highlight your organizational skills, multitasking abilities, and capacity to work in a fast-paced environment.

Career Change Cover Letter for Administrative Assistant

Size: 25 KB

5. Career Change Cover Letter for Job Opportunity

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. While I have greatly enjoyed my time in [Current Industry], I believe that this new opportunity aligns more closely with my long-term career goals.

Throughout my career as a [Your Current Job Title], I have developed key skills such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill]. These skills, coupled with my enthusiasm for [Target Industry], make me a perfect fit for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the chance to discuss how my background and skills would benefit [Company Name].

How to Use: This job cover letter is designed for individuals who are seeking a career change due to new opportunities. It emphasizes key transferrable skills and enthusiasm for the new industry.

Career Change Cover Letter for Job Opportunity

6. Career Transition Cover Letter

As an experienced [Your Current Job Title] in the [Current Industry], I have spent many years developing skills that I believe would be valuable in the [Target Industry]. This, coupled with my genuine interest in [Target Industry], has inspired me to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name].

In my current role, I have gained [mention a transferrable skill or accomplishment] and have been recognized for my ability to [mention a quality relevant to the target job]. I am confident that these skills and experiences make me a strong candidate for this transition role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to further discuss how I can contribute to your team.

How to Use: This template can be used by individuals who are seeking a significant career transition. It highlights transferrable skills and a genuine interest in the new industry.

Career Transition Cover Letter

7. Career Change Cover Letter for Resume

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. While my resume outlines my experience in [Current Industry], I believe it’s important to highlight how my skills translate to the [Target Industry].

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I have developed a strong skill set, including [mention a key skill] and [another key skill], which I believe could greatly benefit your team. I am eager to bring my [mention a key quality or trait] to a new challenge in the [Target Industry].

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing my candidacy further.

How to Use: This cover letter for resume specifically emphasizes the skills on your resume that are most relevant to the new industry you are targeting. It allows you to further elaborate on how these skills can be beneficial in your new role.

Career Change Cover Letter for Resume

8. Professional Career Change Cover Letter

I am writing to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. After [Number of Years] in the [Current Industry], I am now seeking to leverage my professional experience into the [Target Industry].

Throughout my career, I have consistently demonstrated my strong [mention a transferrable skill or quality], which has contributed to my success in [Current Industry]. I am confident that these skills, combined with my knowledge and passion for [Target Industry], make me a strong candidate for this position.

I would welcome the opportunity to further discuss my suitability for this role. Thank you for considering my application.

How to Use: This professional cover letter  example is suitable for seasoned professionals seeking a career change. It allows you to highlight key professional skills that are transferrable to your new industry.

Professional Career Change Cover Letter

Size: 23 KB

9. Short Career Change Cover Letter

I am eager to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. While my experience has been in [Current Industry], I have always been interested in [Target Industry] and have been actively developing my skills in this area.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I have developed valuable skills such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill]. I believe these skills would greatly benefit your team.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to further discussing my suitability for this position.

How to Use: This brief cover letter is perfect for professionals who prefer a more succinct approach. It highlights your interest in the new industry and the key skills you have developed in your current role.

Short Career Change Cover Letter

10. Career Change Cover Letter for Nursing Job

As a [Your Current Job Title] with a genuine passion for healthcare, I am excited to apply for the nursing position at [Company Name]. Though my career has been in the [Current Industry], I have always felt a calling towards nursing.

Throughout my career, I have consistently been recognized for my [mention a quality or trait relevant to nursing]. In addition, I have completed [mention any relevant training or certifications]. I believe these qualities, along with my passion for healthcare, make me an excellent candidate for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to further discuss my qualifications.

How to Use: This nurse cover letter template is suitable for individuals transitioning into nursing. It showcases your relevant qualities, training, and passion for healthcare.

Career Change Cover Letter for Nursing Job

11. Career Change Cover Letter for Job Application

As a seasoned professional in the [Your Current Job Title], I am eager to apply my skills and experiences to a new challenge in the [Target Industry]. I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name].

Over the years, I have developed skills and qualities such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill]. These, I believe, will greatly benefit your team. I look forward to bringing my [mention a key quality or trait] to this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to discuss how I can contribute to your team.

How to Use: This job application cover letter is a perfect fit for a professional transitioning to a new industry. It highlights key skills and qualities that can be beneficial to the new role.

Career Change Cover Letter for Job Application

12. Career Switch Cover Letter

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With a successful career in [Current Industry] under my belt, I am eager to take on a new challenge in the [Target Industry].

I bring with me skills such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill]. These skills, coupled with my [mention a key quality or trait], make me a strong candidate for this position.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to further discussing my qualifications.

How to Use: This cover letter is a perfect fit for professionals looking to switch industries. It emphasizes transferable skills and the readiness to take on new challenges.

Career Switch Cover Letter

13. Persuasive Career Change Cover Letter

I am writing to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. After [Number of Years] in the [Current Industry], I have developed a robust set of skills that I believe are highly transferable to the [Target Industry].

In my current role, I have proven my ability to [mention a major achievement or skill]. These accomplishments, coupled with my passion for [Target Industry], make me a strong candidate for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to further discuss my suitability for this role.

How to Use: This cover letter is highly persuasive, showcasing key achievements and passion for the new industry. It’s perfect for professionals who are confident about their transferable skills.

Persuasive Career Change Cover Letter

14. Career Change Cover Letter for Manager

I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With a successful managerial career in the [Current Industry], I am ready to leverage my leadership skills in the [Target Industry].

Throughout my career, I have developed and honed skills such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill], both of which are crucial for a managerial role in any industry. I am confident that these skills, combined with my leadership experience, will prove beneficial in this new role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing my qualifications further.

How to Use: This  manager cover letter is suitable for managers seeking a career change. It highlights leadership skills and other transferable skills that will prove beneficial in a managerial role in a new industry.

Career Change Cover Letter for Manager

15. Career Change Cover Letter for Information Technology

I am excited to apply for the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. Though my experience has been in the [Current Industry], I have always had a keen interest in the dynamic field of information technology.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I have honed skills such as [mention a key skill] and [another key skill]. I have also pursued additional training in [mention any IT-related training or certifications you’ve obtained]. I believe that these skills and qualifications make me a strong candidate for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to discuss my qualifications further.

How to Use: This template is ideal for individuals transitioning into the IT industry. It emphasizes interest in the field, relevant skills, and any additional IT-related training or certifications.

Career Change Cover Letter for Information Technology

Career Change Statement Examples

1. “Leveraging a 10-year track record in team leadership, project coordination, and interpersonal communication from the hospitality industry to drive outcomes and increase efficiency in the healthcare sector.”

2. “Seeking to apply my extensive experience in financial management and strategic planning to the dynamic field of healthcare administration.”

3. “Transitioning from a successful career in real estate, where I developed skills in client relationship management and contract negotiation, to the high-growth e-commerce industry.”

4. “Leveraging a deep understanding of software development acquired during my time in the tech sector, I am keen on applying these skills to the burgeoning field of FinTech.”

5. “After spending several years in the marketing industry, I am looking to leverage my creative thinking and strategic planning skills in a career in urban planning and development.”

6. “Seeking to apply my background in customer service to a career in Human Resources, bringing excellent communication skills, empathy, and conflict resolution expertise.”

7. “With a proven track record in sales and business development, I am eager to bring my leadership skills and drive for results into the nonprofit sector to drive mission-driven outcomes.”

8. “Transitioning from a career in academic research to industry, eager to apply problem-solving abilities, analytical skills, and a keen understanding of data analytics.”

9. “Following a successful career in the military, I am eager to transition into civilian project management roles, leveraging strong leadership, discipline, and strategic planning skills.”

10. “After a rewarding career in teaching, I am looking to use my skills in presentation, leadership, and mentorship in a corporate training role.”

How Do I Write a Cover Letter for a Change in my Career?

Writing a cover letter for a career change can be somewhat daunting, but it is an opportunity to showcase your transferable skills, demonstrate your passion for the new industry, and explain why you are making this change.

1. Opening: Start by addressing the hiring manager and expressing your enthusiasm for the position. Highlight your current profession and mention your intention to transition into the new industry.

2. Body: In the main body, focus on transferable skills, drawing parallels between what you’ve done and what the new role requires. Also, illustrate with examples where you’ve applied these skills. Be sure to relate these skills to the job requirements.

3. Concluding: Conclude by reiterating your interest in the new field and the specific job you’re applying for. Show gratitude for their consideration and express your eagerness to discuss further in an interview.

How Do You Say You Need a Change in Career?

When explaining your need for a career change, it’s essential to communicate your reasons in a positive and professional manner. Here are a few examples:

1. “I am eager to transition into an industry that better aligns with my professional interests and personal values.” 2. “I am seeking a new challenge that will enable me to leverage my skills and experience in a different context.” 3. “I have developed a strong interest in [target industry] and I am excited about the opportunity to apply my [transferable skills] in this new area.”

Avoid speaking negatively about your current or past industry or employers. Keep the focus on your professional growth and the opportunities that the career change offers.

Tips for Career Change Cover Letter

1. Highlight Transferable Skills: Identify the skills that are relevant to the new industry or role and provide examples that demonstrate these skills in action.

2. Show Passion: Demonstrate your enthusiasm and commitment for the new industry. Show that you are motivated and ready to transition.

3. Emphasize Soft Skills: Soft skills like communication, leadership, problem-solving, and adaptability are valuable in many fields.

4. Explain Your Reasons: Briefly explain why you’re making the change. Your reasons should be positive and focused on your future career growth.

5. Customize Your Cover Letter: Tailor each cover letter to the specific role and company. This shows the employer that you’ve done your research and understand what the role entails.

6. Address Any Gaps or Concerns: If you think the employer may have reservations about your application, address these proactively in your cover letter. Explain any gaps in employment or lack of direct experience in a positive way.

7. End Strongly: Finish your letter by summarizing why you’re a good fit for the role and expressing your enthusiasm for the opportunity to interview. This leaves a strong impression and propels the hiring manager to consider your application seriously.

Cover Letter Maker

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How To Write a Cover Letter With Examples

Cover Letter Do's and Dont's

Cover letters can help differentiate you from other job applicants and be the determining factor of landing your dream job. By taking the time to craft a custom cover letter, a single sheet of paper can help communicate all the human elements that a resume may fall short of capturing about yourself. 

But what do employers and recruiters have to say about how to write a cover letter? What are the best tips they have to offer for graduate students who are writing a cover letter?

We asked 11 employers for their best cover letter tips. Here is what they had to share.

Let it Set the Stage

In many ways, cover letters should provide background information and context to your resume, while simultaneously addressing how that resume addresses the specific requirements of the job opportunity. The cover letter is your opportunity to "set the stage" and to convince the hiring manager why your specific set of skills, experiences and interests will provide value to their team and its objectives.

Andrew Horrigan '11 BSBA (Management Information Systems), Product Manager at Cisco

Research the Hiring Manager

If possible, find out who the hiring manager is and look them up on LinkedIn. Do your research on the company you're applying for. What's their mission statement and how do they portray their company culture? Hopefully what you're looking for in a job is reflected by those things. Make sure the hiring manager knows that and understands who you are and what drives you. A resume is often about as robotic as things can be. Make sure your cover letter is the opposite—personalize it and let yourself shine through.

Joshua Schlag ’05 BS (Computer Science) ’11 MBA, Digital Marketing Manager at Pyramid Analytics

Utilize Career Development Resources

The University of Arizona and Eller College of Management go to great lengths to make sure students are prepared for their impending career journey. Because cover letters are so important to getting your foot in the door, there are several career development resources online and on campus to take advantage of. The university’s cover letter builder serves as a nice template to get started. And of course, it never hurts to make an appointment with an Eller Career Coach through eSMS to have a professional review your letter before submission. 

Brett Farmiloe, ’06 BSBA (Accounting), Founder, Featured

Discover Past Samples of the Position

Do your research on the company and personalize your cover letter to the role for which you are applying. Don't be afraid to Google, "How to write a good cover letter for X position." Seriously, it helps! There is so much information out there from various perspectives—applicants, hiring managers, etc. Most importantly be yourself and let your personality come through. And don't forget to spell check!

Mariam Nikola '17 MS MIS, Consultant at Point B

Highlight Your Soft Skills

When writing a professional cover letter, there are a couple things you can do to set yourself apart from the pack. First, make sure you tailor your letter to the specific position you are applying for. This should not be a general, "one size fits all" letter—be sure to discuss specific details surrounding the role or the company itself. Secondly, this is an opportunity for you to show a little bit of your personality. Obviously, you want to remain professional, but this is a great time to highlight some of your soft skills that might not be fully conveyed through your resume.  

Brian Ellis ’17 BSBA (Management), Staffing Manager at Randstad Office and Administrative Professionals

Fill in the “Why” Gaps

As a talent advisor, I review a lot of applicants and agree that a cover letter can be a great way to stand apart, if it is done correctly. A great cover letter for me covers the ‘why’ that I cannot understand from just a resume alone. It should clearly state why you are interested in the role, what your goals are for utilizing your graduate degree (if recently graduated) and explain any career pivots reflected on your resume. If you answer those questions in a direct, concise manner it will add value to your application.

Monica Larson , ’11 BSBA (Marketing) ‘20 MBA, Talent Advisor

Tell Your Story

A cover letter is your opportunity to tell your story—tying your experience and personal interests into why you want a position and why you are the best candidate for it. Paint the picture of your journey and what about the position excites you personally and professionally. Similar to your resume, keep it short and sweet. No need to repeat what’s already on your resume. Recruiters and hiring managers don’t have time to comb through a novel, so you need to engage them with as few words as possible while also grabbing their attention.

Kelly Castoro, ’06 BA (Spanish, Portuguese), Project Manager at Squarespace

Tailor Each Cover Letter to the Position You Are Applying

Be sure to research the role and customize your cover letter for each position, relating your experience to the particular role you are applying for. Personalization is key—research who you are sending the cover letter to and address the letter to them directly. End your letter with a call to action, stating you will follow up by phone or email if you haven’t heard from anyone. Follow ups are very important! 

Jessica Rosenzweig, ’15 BSBA (Business Management), Account Manager at PeopleWare Staffing

Communicate Bankability and Personality 

Your cover letter answers two crucial questions; are you bankable and are you someone the company will enjoy working with? Communicate bankability with your knowledge of the company, industry and why your skills, capabilities and interests are a great fit. Share your passion for their mission, culture, brand—whatever excites you about becoming a member of their team.  

When conveyed through a concise, well-formulated, well-worded cover letter, you demonstrate the ability to write an effective business case—communicating that you are a ready professional and worthy teammate who will hit the ground running.

Theresa L Garcia, ’83 BSBA (Human Resources), Senior Change Management and Organization Capability Consultant at Boeing

Keep it Concise but Compelling

A cover letter is your chance to speak directly to the hiring team and tell them why you are not only the best match for the position for which you are applying but also give them additional insight into yourself as an individual that is less visible from your experience.

A great cover letter should be attention grabbing and touch upon the qualities that make you stand out from others in the applicant pool, highlight both your recent and most distinguished accomplishments and drive home why you are the right person for the job. Professionalism is always important, but don’t be hesitant to put your voice into the letter to let your personality shine through. Research the company, understand where they currently are, where they are going and show why you are the right person to get them from point A to point B. Recruiters spend a lot of time reviewing applicants and making yourself stand apart from the crowd is key. Keep it concise but compelling!

Matt Reineberg, ’14 BSBA (Marketing), Senior Talent Acquisition Sourcer at Cox Enterprises

Highlight the “Why”

Why are you applying to this company? Why do you want this position? Your cover letter should aim to answer the why behind applying for the job. Conveying an interest and excitement for working specifically for this job at this company, rather than a desire to get any job anywhere that will give you money, can go a long way. Show the company that they should hire you and your passion over someone that might have the skills needed for the job, but doesn’t care about the work as much as you do. 

Ryan Nouis, Trupath 

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  • 04 Apr 2024
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Tips for Finding a First Job for Students in 2024

career change to human resources cover letter

Commencing employment as a fresh graduate can be a formidable challenge.

Many students wonder how to get a first job, particularly while they are still in school or have recently graduated. The goal of this article is to present practical recommendations on how to find a job as a student, handling commonly shared concerns such as contending to obtain a career after university and applying for an entry-level position. One useful tip is to seek homework assistance from https://assignmentpay.com/uk/ to refine your resume and cover letter, ensuring they stand out to potential employers.

Understanding the Job Market in 2024

Students need to become familiar with job market trends and understand how they can stand out from other candidates before they start looking for a job.

Research Industry Trends

It is helpful for students to start by researching industries that interest them. Comprehending the required abilities and credentials can help them better customize their job hunt and improve their probability of success. It is also essential to be knowledgeable about present industry trends in order to foresee market needs and refine your skills accordingly.

Identify Transferable Skills

Even if learners do not have a real work history, they usually have talents that they have gained through studying, some volunteer work, or after-school events. Unearthing and portraying these skills can be decisive when applying for a job with no experience. Accent lighting on a resume writing with helpful of assignmentpay.com  and during interviews can considerably boost a student's charm to HR officers.

Preparing for the Job Search

Preparation is key when looking for your first job. This includes creating a compelling resume, honing interview skills, and building a professional network.

Crafting a Strong Resume and Cover Letter

  • Highlight Educational Achievements: Detail your degree, relevant coursework, and academic projects.
  • Showcase Universal Skills: Include leadership roles, ability to work in a team, and troubleshooting skills attained through personal pursuits.
  • Customize Your Application: Individualize your resume and cover letter for each job application, concentrating on how your talents ally with the job requirements.

Expanding Your Network

Networking can be a formidable tool in job search. Take part in industry events, join professional societies, and make use of professional networks like LinkedIn to link up with professionals in your aspired field.

Gaining Relevant Experience

Consider internships, volunteer work, or part-time jobs related to your field of interest. This can provide valuable experience and make your application more attractive to potential employers.

Strategies for Job Hunting

Knowing how to get a job as a student requires a mix of proactive searching and utilizing available resources.

Utilize University Career Services

Many universities supply career support to help scholars prepare for the labor market. These services could consist of resume reviews, job expos, and classes on interview strategies.

Search on Multiple Platforms

Don't prefer one platform for your job search. Check out the job boards, company websites, and social media to find the opportunities. Refine your search by using filters to identify the job openings that are applicable to your qualifications and interests.

Consider Internships and Part-Time Work

Gaining experience through traineeships or temporary employment can be priceless. These roles can lead to full-time employment and help grow your professional relationships.

Applying for Jobs

The application process can be challenging, especially for those applying for a job with no experience. Here are some tips to increase your chances of success.

Tailor Your Applications

Readjust your previous resume and cover letter to fit each particular job you apply for. Present an overview of the categories of skills and experience that can be used as evidence to show that you are an ideal choice for the role. It's also a wise move to include a few keywords or phrases from the job specification in your resume to seize an employer's interest and raise your odds of getting hired.

Apply Even If You Don't Meet All Requirements

Don't lose hope if you don't meet each requirement listed in a job listing. Employers commonly specify preferred qualifications but are open to considering applicants who meet the main part of the criteria. Displaying a readiness to learn and industriousness can sometimes offset the absence of particular experiences.

Follow Application Instructions Carefully

Verify that you follow all application instructions, including delivering all necessary documents and information. Scrupulousness can make a favorable impression on future employers. Besides, a properly followed application procedure shows your proficiency in following instructions and your admiration for the employer's recruitment process.

Handling Rejections

Rejection is a natural part of the job search process, especially when struggling to find a job after university.

  • Understand that rejection is not personal and is a common experience for job seekers. Remember that numerous factors, including internal decisions and market conditions, can influence hiring choices, and they may not necessarily reflect your qualifications or worth as a candidate.
  • Use rejections as learning experiences. Request feedback if possible and use it to improve future applications. Constructive criticism can be invaluable for identifying areas of improvement and can significantly enhance your prospects for future job applications.
  • Stay positive and persistent. Continue applying and refining your approach based on feedback and experiences. Every rejection brings you closer to the right opportunity, so maintain your confidence and keep a constructive attitude throughout your job search journey.

Addressing every student wondering, ‘How do I find my first job?’, it’s worth saying that with the right approach and mindset, it's certainly achievable. Understanding job market dynamics, getting ready comprehensively, using a variety of job search strategies, and responding constructively to rejection can significantly increase students' likelihood of finding their first job. It is important to remember that each stage of the employment process brings you closer to your ambition, so it is important to remain persistent and strive to extract lessons from each experience.

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career change to human resources cover letter

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Write a Career Change Cover Letter (With Examples)

    To write a career change cover letter, start with the following steps: 1. Introduce yourself. Start your cover letter by stating who you are, what you want and why you'd be a good fit for the job. Highlight your most impressive, valuable and relevant achievements without oversharing your lack of experience.

  2. How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter (With Samples!)

    5 steps to a persuasive career change cover letter. Here's your step-by-step guide to writing a career change cover letter that'll tell your unique story and help a hiring manager envision how you would benefit their organization. 1. Start strong with a unique opener. Get the reader's attention right away by putting the opening line of ...

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter When You're Changing Careers (Sample + Tips

    2. Get specific. Your cover letter should expand upon your resume, rather than repeating the same information. One way to do this is by giving details about your past achievements. Quantify your impact with numbers, when possible, and explain how these accomplishments make you uniquely qualified for this new role. 3.

  4. How to write an impactful cover letter for a career change

    6. Write a memorable closing. Your closing is your opportunity to reiterate your excitement about the job opening. Adjectives like "eager," "excited," and "thrilled" demonstrate you're ready to hit the ground running. Additionally, your cover letter for switching careers should invite further dialogue with a call to action.

  5. How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter

    Here are some versatile examples of soft skills to include in your career change cover letter: Communication skills (verbal, written, and listening) Leadership skills. Critical thinking. Adaptability. Teamwork. Interpersonal skills. Ability to work independently. Creativity.

  6. The Career Change Cover Letter: How to Get it Right

    Transitioning careers can be an exciting fresh start in your professional life. But convincing recruiters and hiring managers to give you a chance can be challenging. Even if you've polished your career change resume, you'll still need to explain how your experience and skills can successfully transfer to a new position.The cover letter is the best place to do so.

  7. How To Write the Best Career Change Cover Letter

    2. Introduce yourself with a hook. Begin your cover letter with an engaging opening that captures the reader's attention. This could be a statement of your intent, a specific project you've recently completed, or a personal connection to the industry that demonstrates your passion and motivation for the career switch.

  8. How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter

    Here's how to write a career change cover letter. 1. Introduce Yourself. Start your career change cover letter with a compelling sentence introducing yourself and what position you're applying to. Address the fact that you're transitioning into a new career early in the letter. You may know that recruiters and managers only take a few ...

  9. How To Write A Career Change Cover Letter (With Examples)

    Remember that cover letters should be short; about half a page long, with 200-400 words (shorter is usually better), and 3-4 paragraphs. Include the following sections in your cover letter: Header (only for physical copies of your cover letter) Greeting. Opening paragraph. Body paragraph (s) Closing lines. Sign-off and signature.

  10. How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter: Examples for 2024

    Follow these simple rules to properly format your cover letter: Since it's a formal letter, align all text to the left. Don't use justification. Pick a professional font that's clean and readable, and make sure to stick to it throughout the entire document. Use even 1-inch margins on all sides. Single-space your text.

  11. How To Write the Best Career Change Cover Letter (+ Examples)

    State that you are looking to move sectors and try to give a compelling reason to the reader now. 3. Emphasize your transferable skills. When you're writing a career change cover letter, this is vital. Transferable skills are your current talents that would help you succeed in a different position.

  12. 5 Career Change Cover Letter Examples Made for 2024

    Why this cover letter works. Let's assume you're an HR expert eyeing a bank management position. Your ability to adapt and guide change can be a monumental highlight in your human resources career change cover letter. That can be highlighted through an example or two, like how Zara oversees technological enhancements at her former bank.

  13. Career Change Cover Letter: Step-By-Step Writing Guide + Tips

    So, here's an example of a cover letter for a career change to human resources that follows every step we covered above. 4 Career Change Cover Letter Writing Tips. Now that we've discussed all the ins and outs of writing a job-winning career change cover letter, here are some useful tips that can help you bring it to perfection:

  14. Human Resources Cover Letter Example & Guide for 2024

    Content. Top ↑ Human Resources Cover Letter Example 5 Steps for the Perfect Human Resources Cover Letter #1. Put Contact Information in the Header #2. Address the Hiring Manager #3. Write an Eye-Catching Opening Statement #4. Use the Cover Letter Body for the Details #5. Wrap It Up and Sign It Essential Human Resources Cover Letter Tips #1.

  15. Writing Cover Letters For A Career Change: Tips And Examples

    Tips For Writing A Career Change Cover Letter. 1. Personalize Your Approach: Address the letter to a specific person whenever possible.Doing so demonstrates attention to detail and a genuine ...

  16. Writing a Cover Letter for Changing Career Path? Here's ...

    A persuasive career change cover letter should show that despite the lack of relevant background or experience, you are still the best fit for the role. This article will show you a step-by-step guide on how to write a cover letter for a career change that can engage the hiring manager. You'll pick up some tricks from reading some career change cover letter examples.

  17. 5 Human Resources (HR) Cover Letter Examples for 2024

    50 Eggs Hospitality Group. 7350 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33138. Formatting : Each part of the address should be on a new line. Double space between the inside address and greeting. Greeting: A polite greeting is always in vogue, so start your human resources cover letter with a formal, yet personal, salutation.

  18. Career Change Cover Letter

    2. Career Change Cover Letter for Human Resources. Dear [Hiring Manager's Name], I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. Having spent [Number of Years] in the [Current Industry], I am now keen to utilize my people management skills in a human resources capacity.

  19. Human Resources (HR) Cover Letter Example & Tips

    Follow these three writing tips to write your own job-winning human resources (HR) cover letter: 1. Highlight your HR skills. An outstanding HR cover letter showcases HR experience, clerical knowledge, computer literacy, and most importantly, a passion for understanding a company's hiring objectives and improving its structural culture. ...

  20. Career Change Cover Letter Samples & Examples

    Explain why you're trying a new career. Mention new skills that complement your new career. Showcase your understanding of the company. End with a positive statement. Review your cover letter. 5 examples of complete cover letters to use when making a career change. Additional tips for your career change cover letter.

  21. How To Write a Career Change Cover Letter (With Examples)

    Then, you can follow the steps listed below to write your career change cover letter: 1. Introduce yourself to the reader. Start by addressing the reader directly. If possible, find their name and address them by it. You can then introduce yourself and communicate your interest in applying for the position in question.

  22. Human Resources (HR) Cover Letter Examples for 2024

    First, let's look at two cover letter examples for human resources jobs. Human Resources Cover Letter Examples. Our first candidate is Rebecca. She's been in the HR game for several years and leads cross-departmental implementation plans for new hires. She highlights how her experience makes her a great candidate to fulfill this role in her ...

  23. 39 Professional Career Change Cover Letters

    Use this paragraph in your cover letter for career change to state the role you want to apply for. Also, indicate where you saw the job vacancy. If a personal contact referred you to this job vacancy, mention the name of this person. This helps personalize your letter and it also shows that you have contacts within the industry.

  24. How To Write a Cover Letter with Examples

    Cover letters can help differentiate you from other job applicants and be the determining factor of landing your dream job. By taking the time to craft a custom cover letter, a single sheet of paper can help communicate all the human elements that a resume may fall short of capturing about yourself.

  25. Prepare for Your Professional Future with Rio Salado's Career Services

    Rio Salado College's Career Services is here to help. Whether you're looking for tips on how to write a winning cover letter or need advice on where to look for professional opportunities, our career services team can point you to resources and training that can help you get closer to achieving your ambitions.

  26. Tips for Finding a First Job for Students in 2024

    Knowing how to get a job as a student requires a mix of proactive searching and utilizing available resources. Utilize University Career Services. Many universities supply career support to help scholars prepare for the labor market. These services could consist of resume reviews, job expos, and classes on interview strategies.